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5

The authors of the test implicitly consider the simplest law the only correct Google-assisted translation from the text at the top of the page, emphasis added: "...these are questions that intend to assess the candidate's ability to quickly discover the criterion by which numbers and letters are arranged within a given succession. Also in this case, no ...


26

I actually think this is a question about mathematics, or more precisely about mathematics education (and in the limited scope in which it is presented it would be a better fit on the Math Educators stack exchange), but there is a larger academic issue which is perhaps what you are “really” asking about. The point is this: as educators we try very hard to ...


5

If a student is knowledgeable enough to recognize that all the options are correct, (s)he should also be knowledgeable enough to recognize which is the answer that's desired. As the exam-setter, you can never exclude the possibility that there's something you aren't aware of which could make a multiple-choice question have multiple answers. For example in ...


11

Although not reliably explicitly made a part of the question, it is widely understood that the "correct" continuation of a sequence is the (allegedly) "simplest". There is still a problem with the notion of "simplicity", since it is relative to context. (The notion of "Kolmogorov-Solomonoff-Chaitin complexity" is a rigorous approach, but certainly not ...


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Actually, it would be wrong to reject such an answer, but the student had better have evidence to back it up. This is the sort of thing that a teacher might be misled by if they haven't actually developed the question themself. Or worse if they are a "tester" rather than a "teacher". Worst, if they are teaching "by the book", keeping one day ahead of the ...


1

Absolutely not. An IQ-test does not tell much about the candidates and it does most likely not tell about the skills which one needs in a job. For work, being a good reliable worker with social skills is often more important than IQ. Moreover, do you really propose that the state should tell the lower half of the people "hey you are too stupid, you will ...


1

Don't think to much about being ashame for scoring low. One of my professor pointed out that we should be mature, meaning don't just look at the score, look at what you learn. Even if you can't solve it in class you should talk to someone, e.g. your professor, to know how to solve it, and that helps you learn. Remember your (short term) goal is to pass the ...


5

Remember exams are supposed to measure your mastery of the material, and if you focus on only two out of four topics, you haven't mastered all the material - at best you've mastered 50%. Trying to game a passing score this way is not a winning strategy; even if it works, you'll come out of grad school thinking you barely learned anything (example). That ...


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