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0

This third-party documentation on Moodle "assignment" activities suggests that it's possible to release feedback files to students without revealing the student identities to the marker; but I've never tried it.


1

In an online file sharing system (e.g. dropbox, google drive, onedrive...) create as many folders as you have students. Create a share link for each folder with write access. Send the share links and the list of student emails to a trusted third party, and ask them to randomly assign a share link to each student. Tell the student to upload (anonymously) ...


10

I'll make the argument: No, instructors should not use this tool at Chegg. In general, Chegg is among the worst actors of the online academic community. Their business model is fundamentally predicated on supporting violations of academic integrity, fraud, and malfeasance. In this sense, we should not be supporting them with engagement, mind-share, or test ...


4

For what it's worth, my High School in Pennsylvania did in fact use E instead of F. This was in the mid 2000s.


19

I haven't located a super reliable source, but from Slate: The earliest record of a letter-grade system comes from Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts in 1897. [...] The lowest grade at Mount Holyoke was an E, which represented failure. [...] One year later, administrators changed the failing grade to F and tweaked the other letters. The new scale ...


2

While this is an unusual way to conduct quizzes in an academic environment, it is letting you practice some new skills in time management and risk management, so I do not share the strong opposition of others to the practice. I also think that academics should have wide latitude to set the rules of their assessments, and while it's not how I would do things,...


3

I'm an undergrad student as well and this type of quizzes have become very familiar over the past year. Giving yourself 2 mins time for the scanning is not enough. I (and my friends in uni) start scanning about 5 mins earlier. Of course, the problem here is that your professor gives you a 50-minute quiz but sends the question paper late, expects you to print ...


8

About your actual question, yes, there is a way to get extended time based on having anxiety during exams or related things (although I cannot make any guesses as to whether you would qualify given your specific situation). Here is what I think is the relevant office at your university to consult about that. About the broader context to your question, this ...


2

Follow the policy on academic dishonesty set out by your university. You're working at an American university; it should have a policy on how breaches of its policy governing academic honesty are to be handled (potentially called something like the "honor code"). As a staff member, I would encourage you to look up those policies and procedures, and ...


3

I take cheating seriously, trying to both dissuade and catch. The options you have given are all "punish" and not "dissuade." You should tell the students explicitly that communicating during the exam is forbidden. You might even tell them that you know certain students plan to break the rules and you are already prepared to gather ...


2

This answer is largely based off the comment that it is an introductory course and the students know already what 'kind' of questions are expected. You also feel that the students in concern can't be dissuaded, so the only option is to make the process of collaboration/cheating more difficult. It is standard practice in many places to have different ...


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