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2

There is a cultural component to this as well, so this may vary between countries. In France for instance children are taught to write in cursive. When I was a kid we had calligraphy classes, now it is just the cursive. So when someone in France thinks "handwritten document", they expect cursive. Of course, if the document comes written the US way (print ...


1

While there may be some odd professor who has an actual preference for a handwriting style per se, the more relevant factors are whether your writing is easily readable and whether it does not distract you too much. I therefore suggest to do the following: Produce samples for each of your two handwriting styles. Impose a time limit. Also, make it a mental ...


19

Most professors prefer handwriting that is legible. I have seen some (asian weirdly, all other nationalities tend to a larger style and there are 90+ nationalities in the establishment) students with handwriting so small it is difficult to read but perfectly formed though. Some write cursive others like small caps but all are fine when neat and legible. ...


7

Professors are people, and people have various preferences. Ask your professor if it’s preferred to use hand writing for assignments and you will get your answer.


0

Given what you describe - if you were the proctor watching students what would you think of the situation... So, when they contact you, you will have to present your side of the story, then a decision will be made. Why did you not just shout at the door “I am in an exam, go away” - at least the proctor could not construe those words for trying to cheat. ...


3

It sounds like in your idealized model, the exam grade is a sum of independent Bernoulli random variables. With this assumption, as a math problem the question is trivial: if you want to achieve a pass rate of X%, the “corrective factor” is any monotone increasing function that maps the grade range of 0-10 to itself and maps the grade of Y to the minimal ...


4

It sounds like your professor plans to monitor video to prevent cheating. Since the exam is open note/open book, this would primarily be to make sure students are not collaborating between each other. I think there are reasons this situation is unfortunate from the students' side: could students be penalized if their video freezes? (mine does all the time ...


1

I think you need to deal with this through your instructor or the university. Personally, I think that requiring you to use a camera has ethical and privacy concerns, but I don't get to judge. What should be the case and how you are constrained are probably quite different. I wish you luck in such a pursuit, but have little faith that you will prevail. ...


2

That is usually covered in the documentation and what the professor decides both prior to and after a situation.


1

It depends on what you want students to learn. Use open ended questions for learning critical thinking. Either approach is good if you want students to learn facts. Nearly always, at the graduate level, you want students learn "critical thinking" from the analyze/evaluate/create parts of the Bloom Taxonomy of learning. Frequently this is the case at the ...


-2

Put both types of questions in the exam. So, some students get the highest grades because they can answer both types well, Other students get lower grades because they answer type 1 well but poorly answer type 2, This gives a range of grades based on the students performance. Deliberately not going in to the discussion about whether exams are a suitable ...


2

the time the answers were submitted is identical That is not how cheating works. Assume we have a cheating scheme. Person 1 (P1) solves the question, marks it, then opens up a communication line to P2, communicates the message, P2 reads it, marks the answer. This is significant amount of delay, I reckon at least 5 seconds. It also assumes the cheaters are ...


0

One of the most straightforward ways to prove your innocence is to simply submit the work that you had done on the side while answering the questions. That should be able to provide an accurate idea of what was going on through your head while you were answering the question (given that it requires calculations). In the case that the questions did not have ...


2

Dmitry's suggestion is an excellent one. I would like to offer another. You can explain the situation to the student and offer a few compensation options. It can be boosting grades in ratio of the lost time or another exam of similar difficulty. I fear an administrative decision might yield a negative result for the student. As far as I am concerned, the ...


18

You don't have to be the person who decides what to do in this situation. Actually, there are many reasons to remove yourself from making further decisions. Take it back to the administration of your Department / University, give them a fair account of what's happened, and let them decide what to do.


15

No, if you aren't going to be graded on them it isn't cheating. But it is foolish. The point of the questions is to give you practice in solving them, not to obtain answers that the professor already has. If you don't practice your craft you will never get very good at it. Moreover, just seeing an answer will very likely give you almost no insight in ...


2

Ultimately, there must be some time limit, since the results must be submitted to be graded before the end of the course. For many courses in the humanities, the 'exam' is instead a paper to be worked on over a period of time (perhaps a week) and turned in by a given time. I suspect this is not what you are looking for. Instead, you are asking about an on-...


-2

TL;DR: Your professor probably does not care about these issues as much as you do. That is a non-problem. Just reach out to your professor and do not sweat over it. Focus on whatever is more important than these grades. Family, sports, opposite/same sex, this does not worth your time. Longer answer: If you have a concern about something that affects your ...


4

It is perfectly acceptable to give your professor negative feedback on the exam format. You can either do this by email, or you could do it anonymously with an unsigned letter in her pigeonhole on campus (once it is open). Since the exam format was necessitated by the remote learning circumstances due to COVID-19, it is likely that your professor already ...


17

It’s totally appropriate to point out to your professor that your grade is suffering for technical reasons having to do with the online format of the exam. If your professor is reasonable she will not be in the least bit offended by this. By the way, we are pretty much all dealing with issues of this sort nowadays. I experienced something similar just a few ...


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