New answers tagged

4

If assignments are about "knowledge," it might seem that a teacher who does not know the answer to the assignments is unfit to teach. Knowledge, however, is not the end of many (most?) lessons. In many cases, assignments are about skills more than knowledge, and a teacher does not necessarily need to be able to complete all the assignments themself ...


1

I'm in my undergrad and have asked myself this question in the past. I think a teacher should be capable of scoring in the top 10% of students in the same conditions (time, amount of notes, etc.), and near max points if no constraints. There is no doubt a gray area when the class is very interdisciplinary.


2

The sort answer is yes if the students learn something and they appreciate the experience. Knowledge Transfer Perspective: When a teacher presents a good open problem to students, she offers valuable information. A good open problem is one which a lot of people are interested in and for which no known solution exists. If, in addition, the teacher herself has ...


-2

George Dantzig was mathmetician who famously solved two "homework problems" set by his lecturer, that were in fact unsolved problems in statistics. So if you happen to be teaching a genius then yes, it's a great idea to set problems you can't solve yourself!


3

I don't think, particularly for extension problems, that it is vital the teacher has solved the problem unaided. However it is certainly desirable, just because they will have a better idea of the difficulty if they have done so. However, what is important IMO is that the teacher has seen and verified the solution, since otherwise how can they be sure that ...


2

Have you considered that maybe the teacher did know how to solve the problem (it is an elementary problem) but was using the white lie that they couldn't solve it for motivation? When I was a teacher, I would do things to "model the behaviour" of going from not knowing to knowing and sometimes that means pretending that you don't know the answer ...


2

Should a teacher be able to solve all the assignments they give their students themselves? I'd say yes provided that we are talking about a non research level, where the assignments are intended to prepare students for exams. In this context, if the teacher cannot solve a problem given to the students, then the teacher probably is not qualified and/or ...


9

I have always felt obligated to solve every problem out myself before handing it to a student. I put myself in the student's shoes to see if an assignment is of good quality. This comes at a price in the way lessons could be developed further, I could cover something else, etc. However, this teacher is ABSOLUTELY NOT unfit to teach! I have never been very ...


2

People say that you only understand something properly when you can explain it to others. So, if we say that the teacher has set the students to complete a Sudoku logic puzzle, then as long as the teacher understands and can clearly explain the work, it is no big deal if they can't solve the Sudoku themselves. However, it is doubtless infuriating when a ...


0

In general, yes teachers should and must know the answer. But in very advanced classes such as some specific PhD or Master's classes, the teacher can challenge the students to solve an unsolved problem, or at least explain why a problem is unsolved. One example is the traveling salesman's algorithm which doesn't have an optimal solution. (please correct me ...


22

In general the teacher must be capable of achieving what is they want their students to achieve by undertaking the assignment, but that might not be coming up with a solution. In the modern world where all knowledge is at our finger tips all the time, the job of an educator is much less to impart knowledge, and much more to guide and mentor students, help ...


17

In engineering, when students are asked to solve real world open ended problems,sometimes it works out that there is no solution. Figuring that out is an important outcome.


4

Giving students an assignment which a lecturer can't solve generally should not happen. Sometimes it can be justified (e.g. students involved in a real-life research project, where a problem can have many solutions or none at all), but it has to be made clear to students. However, one mistake does not make anyone unfit for teaching. Just as students, ...


126

In general, yes, a teacher should know how to do any assignment and, in some cases, should have actually done it. In teaching programming, for example, it is usually a mistake to assign a problem that the instructor hasn't essentially done themselves. The reason is that one of the tasks in making assignments is to estimate the effort and time required to do ...


11

My short answer to the question is: yes. Long answer is as follows: Professors/ teachers should definitely have the knowledge that must be passed onto the students. I find it hard to think of an instructor who attempts to teach a topic that they themselves do not understand. However, again, you must be aware that there are different levels to understanding ...


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