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Can an undergraduate student be penalized for exceeding what is expected of a work?

I would expect the professor to provide his/her own guidance on the length and rigor of answers. And I'd expect students to do their reasonable best fit in with this, particularly if it's a large ...
Trunk's user avatar
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19 votes
Accepted

Can an undergraduate student be penalized for exceeding what is expected of a work?

Could this level of detail be a problem for the student when it comes to grading? (In addition to being a time management problem in itself, but I just wanted to know if it could be a problem in terms ...
Matthew Leingang's user avatar
2 votes

Can an undergraduate student be penalized for exceeding what is expected of a work?

I experienced exactly this with a very early problem in a C programming course in 1996. The problem was to do some input-output, which I indeed implemented exactly as specified (IIRC take a couple ...
SoronelHaetir's user avatar
20 votes

Can an undergraduate student be penalized for exceeding what is expected of a work?

I'm pretty sure I've taken off points for "correct answer plus a lot extra that didn't need to be there". The worst case is where the student seems to be guessing a lot of contradictory ...
Owen Reynolds's user avatar
11 votes

Can an undergraduate student be penalized for exceeding what is expected of a work?

Echoing parts of the other (excellent) answers: "writing too much" (yes, there is an issue of judgement!!!) is not good. At an extreme (which I've seen many times), people just "write ...
paul garrett's user avatar
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10 votes

Can an undergraduate student be penalized for exceeding what is expected of a work?

The other answers are quite good, and focus on some of the practical concerns regarding how much or how little you should write in mathematics. However, I think that there is also a sociocultural ...
Xander Henderson's user avatar
44 votes

Can an undergraduate student be penalized for exceeding what is expected of a work?

Two things to consider. First, is there a stated maximum length? If so, conform to it. Second, is a seven page exposition actually better than a 1-2 page presentation? Do any of those details actually ...
Jon Custer's user avatar
  • 13.3k
35 votes

Can an undergraduate student be penalized for exceeding what is expected of a work?

There is a balance you must strike between being detailed and not having enough details. If I asked you to prove that the function x squared is convex, you just take the second derivative and that's ...
Jared Greathouse's user avatar
2 votes

Any natural way to split grade transition ( AA vs AB etc) thresholds for a large class?

I use linear interpolation, picking what I think is an A and what I think is a C such that I get the median I want, and then interpolate in between. It's easy and fair and completely avoids the ...
Nicole Hamilton's user avatar
2 votes

Any natural way to split grade transition ( AA vs AB etc) thresholds for a large class?

Common practice where I've worked: recognise that no-one has perfect intra-marker or inter-marker reliability at the one-percentage-point level. If a student gets 79 (i.e. one mark short of a grade ...
Daniel Hatton's user avatar

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