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0

Let the grade stand, but point out your error. The principle I try to follow is that students shouldn't be negatively affected by faculty mistakes (or that such effects should be minimized). I wouldn't suggest adding an additional assignment to maintain the grade, since this is effectively another kind of penalty. But I would suggest being transparent ...


7

For many of the reasons you state, I would let the original grade stand. I viewed my job as one of teaching, not grading. Overall, the change in the grade will probably be a minor thing, but the effect on the student's psyche should be considered. However, you can also take advantage of the situation to create a teaching moment. It may be too late for this ...


4

The key to answering this question is what the syllabus says. The syllabus is like a contract between the professor and the class describing what happens in different situations that may occur during a term. If the syllabus or departmental guidelines say how to handle the situation, then it makes things easy. (e.g. if you ask for a re-grade in one question, ...


1

I recently had a very important interview for a postdoc position. There were two professors in the interview. One of them fell asleep on multiple occasions. What shocked me was he fell asleep after asking a question and while I try to answer his question. I tried my best to keep him up by changing the pitch of my voice and it really helped. I was a ...


2

(I'm German as the questions author is too, and studied computer science at FU Berlin.) The situation is less complex than your intuition tells you: It is, on an abstract level, very simple. Much of what happens is nice for various reasons, but not actually relevant. The sole purpose of the presentation is that you, personally, learn to give a good ...


3

My suggestion: Go talk to him. He is probably pretty embarrassed about having fallen asleep, and would be appreciative of you not drawing wide attention to this incident. So, arrange a meeting - now, not after the grades are published. In that meeting, tell him what you told us, and how you feel about it. Let him offer an apology and a solution regarding ...


0

... You could always ask the presentation to be remarked by a different lecturer? Being a former student myself, this option has always been common knowledge across the entire class if one is unsatisfied with the assessor. Best act sooner than later, I recall remarking of work after being formally marked only able to reach a certain percentage (60% - or a ...


2

Of course, sleeping on the job is a very unprofessional thing of the professor to do. But should you complain because of the grade? First, as you are in Germany and are most likely not paying for your education, I doubt you find an institution in the university which takes your complaint and is able to do anything about it. You can probably only complain to ...


10

About your grade Granted, you are likely not getting the best assessment of what a fair grade for you would be. But in any decent place, the professor knows he is at fault and won't let his fault put you in trouble. If you are expecting to graduate with some kind of special honors, I'd have a friend put in the word about this to this teacher. If you are ...


7

The poor guy has to listen to dozens of presentations like yours, and most of them are going to be boring. When you go into real life and give presentations to your managers or your customers, they are going to fall asleep if your presentations are boring. When it comes to grading or assessing you, it will come down to "this presentation was so boring, I ...


20

I understand your frustration with a part of your audience sleeping through (some part) of your talk. As many other answers mention, this is unfortunately not an unusual experience for anyone presenting in academia. Members of the audience have different lifestyles and indeed different situations and sometimes the sleep deprivation takes the best of us. It ...


84

The first thing to note here is that sleeping in such situations is often not a voluntary action, but a physiologically unavoidable response to the situation the body is in - many people die every year after falling asleep at the wheel of a car. I don't think you'd describe the results of that on other people in the car as "rude". In general, if you are in ...


6

Wait. Yes, it is insulting or at the very least rude, but ultimately as long as you pass there is no problem... But I do hope you have recorded evidence of your presentation and of the public in case you dont pass. In which case you can demand a revision of your grade based on the lecturer falling asleep multiple times. You mention that the lecturer seemed ...


24

I would advise patience, wait until the grades are out. If the lecturer was actually asleep then that may or may not be something to deal with. However, if the lecturer was not asleep but not looking at you and perhaps reading the papers on the desk or similar you may be starting something you should not. Again, patience and see how it goes.


1

The course is, as I hope, intended to improve students' presentation skills so they can deliver their results more effectively on the international stage, not only on the local backyard called university. English is not my mother tongue, therefore I need to translate the speaker's speech from their accent to english I understand and then to my mother tongue. ...


1

Bottom line, grade according to the published criteria While it varies, most major projects should have well established criteria ahead of time for the students to focus on. Items such as use of proper grammar and word choice may or may not be on it. The type of class matters You didn't mention what type of class this is, and I think that matters a great ...


0

For grading - I would only deduct points if it was quite difficult to understand. If a native-English speaker ALSO spoke too fast, or combined words, would you take a deduction there? I try to be very generous grade-wise with international students, because they are dealing with a lot. Some students are ahead in their written ability than their speaking ...


3

I have serious reason to believe that the planet from which the little prince came is the asteroid known as B-612. This asteroid has only once been seen through the telescope. That was by a Turkish astronomer, in 1909. On making his discovery, the astronomer had presented it to the International Astronomical Congress, in a great demonstration....


5

In my view (and in agreement with Buffy's answer), it is inappropriate and rather unfair to penalise someone for their "accent" (presumably you mean their "pronunciation"; having an accent which does not impede correct pronunciation, is generally not a problem). This is true even if what they say sounds like complete gibberish to anyone in the audience. ...


3

Mark them in accordance with the assessment's marking criteria. Each assessment item should have a sheet of marking criteria that will dictate what is required to reach each grade level for that assessment piece, usually divided up into multiple areas with different weights. In an oral presentation, it's likely that one of the areas you'll be assessing is ...


10

I wish to elaborate on paul garrett's point, which I agree with: It's not about bias for/against languages/nationalities, but about the context in which one operates. If one cannot communicate effectively, that's a minus.. Specifically, I do not agree with a popular approach that assigns some fixed fraction of the marks to "presentation" and the ...


42

Some decades ago, my professor summarized it roughly like this: The professional vocabulary must be right. The grammar should be right, but errors are acceptable if they don't affect meaning. The pronounciation is optional. The goal was to train students to write acceptable papers, and to understand (or be understood by) other students who are benevolent ...


68

There are two ways to interpret the issue that is being raised. One is that the people simply have accents and not completely correct grammar in spoken English... but not to the point that it seriously impedes intelligibility. The other is that their English is so poor that it does greatly impede intelligibility. The former is of little consequence, of ...


5

I think it would be a serious breach to downgrade people for something not really in their control. They will surely improve in time if they stay in English-speaking countries. But you can also do a few things to make it easier. One is to make sure these folks aren't mocked by other students. Respect for all. Another is to ask that presenters also give ...


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