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0

The 'transaction' you and your students are engaged in is between you [the university] and themselves [the student]. If you are secure that your assessment was adequate and fair, there is nothing to be gained in comparing students against each other, especially publicly. If you are not secure in your testing methodology, you might consider grading on a ...


1

There is quite a lot of variation. Some don't even use 4.0 as the top. In some places the grade assigned is a letter grade, not a number. The numeric conversion, then, doesn't involve rounding. It is just the number equivalent to the letter. The numbers are used to compute overall GPA, but do not relate to numeric grades in and individual course. Some ...


5

You probably want to check with your university policy on grade sharing so you don't wander into a problem with your local regulatory body. As for my opinion: I am from the US so the following examples are based on the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), however they may be useful to you anyway. Speaking from a STEM prospective, at my ...


5

As much as the other answers are correct, there is an alternative solution if you indeed want to release the grade distributions without compromising on anonymity. You can use differential privacy (ε-differential privacy with a random response in this case seems applicable) to guarantee that no information can be gained regarding individuals grades, even if ...


10

I take issue with your premise: It seems only fair to tell students how they did relative to the rest of the class In a large class, this seems reasonable: if I know that I'm in the top 5%, I know that I am likely to get an A, regardless of my actual score. Even professors who "don't curve" usually adjust difficulty levels to achieve the desired outcome. ...


48

No, for exactly the reason you give. If just a couple students share their grades with each other, it becomes trivial for others to be discovered by process of elimination.


5

I'm not sure how "common" it is to share a histogram, but I question the value of it. I also worry that it implies in some way that grading is competitive. The worst case, of course, is a zero-sum grading system in which to give person A a point, person B must be denied a point. That is evil. In fact, grading "on the curve" has this characteristic built in. ...


3

I give each student their grade individually - and don’t publish any “list” of any sort. If the student then wants to “publish” their own grade then that is their prerogative. This seems to satisfy the students and I don’t get any issues.


2

If you don't want to disclose to the students the results of others, but you want to let the students know how they did compared to others, you could individually disclose their percentile.


18

Check if the university has a policy on this. This varies wildly across locations: in some places grades are still published with the students' names next to them; in others there are stated policies that this is not allowed. At my university, histograms are automatically published by the system no matter the number of students (even if 2), and there is no ...


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