New answers tagged

1

I seriously doubt it will make much difference. You say you primarily want to work on Y, and your research experience is in Y, so you'll be judged as "a prospective Y student." If applying X to Y is a reasonable thing to do, then saying you're interested in X shouldn't hurt you at all. But without any real background in X, it also probably won't ...


7

The one thing other good answers here have not touched on is this : What can I expect from the course content This is an awfully open-ended question. The professor can probably summarize the course in ten different ways for ten different audiences - which type of answer are you looking for, exactly? This forces them to guess what you're interested in ...


3

I said part of this in a comment upthread, but in the light of the reworded question, it becomes an answer. There is a way one could construe the process such that the professor's response is not negative at all. Step 1: the professor misunderstands "hope this email finds you well" as "hope this email reaches you". Step 2: the professor ...


2

A Professor is not a demi-god (or full one). He is human, fallible, and as with humans you get all kinds of cases on the "Am I an Asshole Or Not?" In your case, he hit the mark "Yes, you are - a flamboyant one". With flying colors. To answer your question: your email was perfect, much better than the "hello, pls snd info on crse for ...


11

You didn't break any rule but you may find the professor not well. I suppose the professor's work consists of: Teaching undergrads (preparing the course, preparing and avaluating test) Supervising PhDs Being active researcher (filling up grant proposals, filling up reports, filling up bugets, organizing lab work, writing articles, reviewing articles) Being ...


1

Generally a good proposal will need to have a literature review (perhaps brief) to motivate the research. A bachelors thesis will not need to be as good of a proposal as one for a grant that a professor would write especially since like the other answer said, you already have approval so it seems like a formality. My undergrad thesis I did as best I could ...


2

I have gotten informal (but written) confirmation from a professor that the topic I suggested is ok, they even assigned some additional mentors...the thesis is not formally registered yet (it's mandated by university policy that registration needs to happen quickly/before substantial work) and I'm supposed to write a proposal. Write as little as possible: ...


2

I would not reply to the answer of the professor, which I find dismissive; I agree with the other answers until this moment. It seems to me that the professor shows zero interest in making that subject interesting for students. Maybe they don't care about the number of the students enrolled on it. Maybe the course content isn't worth signing up for. A better ...


3

In the US, good letters of recommendation are a must. Research experience, especially resulting in publication is definitely a plus, but since it is still a bit rare, you are probably already ahead of the curve there. The "problem" with undergrad research is that, given the time (and maybe money) constraints it is hard to reach a conclusion on ...


8

I think the email is fine, however if I need to critisise the mail, there are two formulations which would trigger me Hope this email finds you well This is not only a cliche phrase used in many Nigerian scam mails which people tend to get nearly weekly (at least in the past). It can also be seen as a greeting between peers. I mean, it’s probably different ...


6

so you must know how to address them appropriately Maybe they were upset that you didn't address them as "Doctor". Doesn't justify the impolite response, but some people are sticklers about that.


18

Suggestions have been made that the Professor's problem might be grammatical (some nit with your opening?) or formal (he prefers to be referred some other way, a different title or something?) But what if he is giving technical advice? That is, perhaps he is referring to emails in particular, since he mentions them. Note that emails in email software are ...


164

There is nothing inappropriate (that anyone can see here) in the way that you've written your email. The response from the professor suggests that they're some combination of (a) incredibly time-constrained, (b) sloppy and unclear in how they communicate, and (c) a jerk. It's possible (as user2768 suggests) that the essential "offense" in their ...


16

First, no reply is needed and will probably result in another push back. But the only problem I see, other than possible insensitivity by the professor, is that, while one letter might be fine, if it is short, it takes time to read (with your personal details) and more time to answer. Imagine being on the other end and getting 30 of these (300?). What if ...


7

The email is very well written. Do verify that the name is not misspelt; some take great offence to this. Additionally, please check if the website offers any details on communication, I.e. TAs to contact etc. If there are any guidelines there, do follow them. A lot of professors (especially at the type of institute I infer you are at) simply don't respond ...


73

Your email is impeccably written. If I compare it to the emails I receive from my students, it would fall in the 99th percentile in terms of email etiquette, grammar, formatting, and including the information relevant to the question you are asking. Your email also compares very favorably with the professor’s reply, which violates several standard rules of ...


97

Your language isn't the problem, your email is well-written, but you've seemingly wasted the professor's time. You could have looked up the information, as they have explained: You may see course content on the department webpage. Comments suggest I'm ignoring the professor's words: you must know how to address them appropriately The word address can mean ...


21

Since no-one here is the teacher in question, it is difficult to know exactly what they meant. The only way to be sure is to ask them, but given your initial contact with this person, that is probably a bad idea. If the person really meant that you were wrong when addressing the mail (and were correct), I can see only one possibility: The person is not a ...


16

Another thing that is slightly unusual (and possibly may considered inappropriate by someone) is the signature. In my experience, usually you don't sign your e-mails "Name - Department - Institution" unless you work there. Being a student does not earn you that right. That said, I agree with the others that the mail is not particularly ...


8

General rule: be concise. Show you did some efforts, next time mention in the email "I have seen that the course page has not been updated in years and I was wondering if it still actual" but only if you feel the course is outdated; You will be following his/her course, why should he/she care about the previous courses you attended? I have a ...


7

I'm not sure I have ever not just skipped straight over any substantial body of writing in a CV. A CV is a data source, not an interpretive document. I go to a CV to answer specific questions (What degree does this person have? do they have any research experience? Have they ever held down a job? etc). An application for a PhD would normally include a ...


2

I believe such a research statement can make a positive impression if it is well-aligned with the research directions of the hiring department, and if your CV includes experiences (from example, from relevant courses) that back up the contents of your research statement. What you want to avoid is being too broad/unfocused (the "shotgun approach") ...


13

A research statement is usually a longer document describing what research you did, why you did it, why it's important, and what you want to do in the future. While your CV should just be about stating the facts about your career, your education, achievements etc. So, no, I would not put a research statement in a CV However you should add a section listing ...


1

Actually, in the US, any research experience at entrance with a bachelors is a plus, possibly a big plus. Having an idea of where you want to go in research is a big plus, even if not entirely settled. So, yes, it is good to mention the specific areas that most interest you and any experience you have with those. But acceptance depends on many things, from ...


2

While this is an unusual way to conduct quizzes in an academic environment, it is letting you practice some new skills in time management and risk management, so I do not share the strong opposition of others to the practice. I also think that academics should have wide latitude to set the rules of their assessments, and while it's not how I would do things,...


3

I'm an undergrad student as well and this type of quizzes have become very familiar over the past year. Giving yourself 2 mins time for the scanning is not enough. I (and my friends in uni) start scanning about 5 mins earlier. Of course, the problem here is that your professor gives you a 50-minute quiz but sends the question paper late, expects you to print ...


8

About your actual question, yes, there is a way to get extended time based on having anxiety during exams or related things (although I cannot make any guesses as to whether you would qualify given your specific situation). Here is what I think is the relevant office at your university to consult about that. About the broader context to your question, this ...


0

Create a new strain of virus that turns into a global pandemic, forcing educational institutions worldwide to conduct exams remotely, so that students must submit a scanned version of their exam/homework solutions rather than a physical copy. Once the scanned copy has been received, there is no opportunity for the student to alter it. In all seriousness... ...


3

It seems from` I reached out to a couple schools who are my top picks, and they told me they have no problem with part-time studies, that you've answered your own question. Besides, you can't change the past, but only the future. Therefore, my advice is to stop "beating yourself up". School can be difficult at the best of times, and things ...


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