New answers tagged

1

Some observations: In India, as far as I know, some institutes like CMI, etc. offer (or used to offer) internship programs. Please note, it is usually very competitive to get selected. Earlier, they used to select students based on NPTEL exam results. I remember reading somewhere that you could also email the respective professor and ask if he/she is ...


2

From what I understand, you (1) don't write model solutions, and (2) only grade a small part of their homework. In my book, either of (1) and (2) is well defensible, but (1)+(2) together hurt your pedagogy. Teaching (particularly at the undergraduate level) is not just about conveying concepts but also about destroying misconceptions. If your students are ...


1

You need to give solutions to some (a few) of the questions. You can not expect students to rediscover in a semester every technique which took (the greatest minds) many years to discover. I like to tackle the problems and learn how to solve as much as I can by myself. Fortunately I often can and I know I got it right. But sometimes I get stuck, and I can ...


0

It' obviously an old question, but generally there are of ways to phrase such an e-mail in a way that would not be rude: "I've looked out of curiosity into this section for teachers and I'm wondering (some specific question about whether the course will be like in this advice) OR (some form of teaching mentioned in this advice would work well for me, ...


3

A pure math major with no physics classes beyond those required for an undergraduate degree is going to be woefully unprepared for graduate school in physics. There is, in fact, relatively little overlap between pure math and theoretical physics; vector calculus, linear algebra, and group theory are about it. (I double majored in pure math and in physics ...


6

A better strategy is to search through the professor's websites, publications, department website, and thesis databases (such as Proquest Disstertations) and look up past students' contact information yourself. Then email the former students directly. Former students are likely to be more informed that current students. There's also no need to ask the ...


8

In part to make a counter-point to the (good from a different angle) accepted answer, I would argue it is not only desirable, but in fact smart from the point of view of the OP. Emails might not be the ideal communication tool (e.g. legally), but finding out how a given teacher performs from their former students is a very good idea. I have personally ...


34

In many places it would likely be viewed as improper. I suggest that you don't do that. Instead, ask the supervisors to pass on a note from yourself to their advisees/students/whoever in which you describe what you want to do and providing contact information for yourself. Make a plea for participation, if you like. But giving your contact information ...


3

I am not entirely sure what the problem is or what you are enquiring about. As pointed out by others there seem to be two different issues: You downloading articles from libgen (or scihub for that matter) Your relation with your supervisor and how to get credit for work you've done. The first point is fairly simple. It may be illegal to download articles ...


0

Besides everything that has already been said, the biggest problem is stealing someone's finished work without referring to the original author. However, you did not do this. The moral deviant here isn't you - and no legal consequences are going to will to you. Let me try to explain why. The open-access or on libgen books are more downloaded and cited than ...


10

I really don't think you should worry about the fact that you downloaded articles from libgen or similar websites. Nobody is going to come arrest you because of that... I doubt anyone will know the articles were illegally downloaded and I highly doubt anyone will be enforcing copyright laws to the point where you will see any consequences. If you think it's ...


0

This is from the perspective of a graduate student: I understand that you want students to persevere, resilience is a valuable character trait that takes time and a bit of pain to develop. However, by not giving students solutions to problems, you might do your objective a disservice because students will be discouraged. But also, providing all of the ...


1

If your second major (economics) is not related to the graduate program (pure? math), your performance in the second major will be viewed the same way as your performance in elective courses. It is not that important but it will count towards any GPA cutoff. If you were applying for a graduate program in economics with an intent to do quantitative research, ...


12

If you don't provide model solutions, it is fairly likely that one of the more advanced students will end up providing their answers to the other students. It doesn't count toward the grade, so it wouldn't be helping someone to cheat. And most of these students will be friends from being in the same courses many times. So a different way to frame it would be,...


6

How can the students know if they have solved an exercise correctly? I have to confess that I underestimated this one. I always thought that in mathematics one knows when one has proven something, but many students obviously don't. However, that is what the tutorials are for. It might be relevant to add here that the tutorials are happening via zoom, and ...


3

Perhaps what you have discovered is that different institutions, and different professors within them have different practices around this. I was an undergraduate more than 50 years ago and some professors at the time posted (in a locked display cabinet outside their office) the solutions to the latest assignments. This made it harder for them to propagate ...


7

How can the students know if they have solved an exercise correctly? Eventually your students are going to leave university and apply what they have learned in your class in their new jobs. When that happens, there will be no solution manual. Better to learn now how to convince themselves that the solution is correct. They are being trained to become the ...


2

This depends a lot of the specific classes. Based on my anecdotal evidence, I'd say the classes are quite different. My anecdotal evidence is that as a physics major, QM 1 was one of the easiest upper division classes I took. Griffiths was super clear. QM 2 was a bit more complicated, but I still thought the material wasn't as difficult as other subjects. ...


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