New answers tagged

2

the grades I earned in these classes will be shown in my transcript, but they just won't count towards my GPA. Is this going to hamper my PhD admissions? Most likely this will have zero effect on your PhD admissions. If you study abroad, do it at a university with a good reputation for the topics you will study. Get good grades. Then apply for a PhD at ...


4

If you cite what you use then you are safe against charges of plagiarism. Citation is an absolute guard here. In general you can do what you like with your own words and thoughts. That leaves only the question of copyright, which varies around the world. I'll speak generally about the requirements, though your country may treat things differently: Copyright ...


0

tl;dr We will not be able to know with certainty whether or not what you have done constitutes an academic integrity violation; however, it seems as though you did not commit a violation. Seeking professional help from a doctor, therapist, or mental health counselor might help you in this situation. Let's walk through your story step by step: Each time, ...


5

You are suffering from an irrational fear. From an academic perspective, I can only tell you that the point to move on from the referencing in your report was somewhere between submitting it and the first few questions you asked your teacher. I suppose you already know this, although a part of your mind is refusing to accept it. As the issue is ultimately ...


-1

As highlighted in another answer, if GRE MATH isn't a pre-requisite for that particular university or college, then it won't help you much. But there is something which you can do to compensate for the low CGPA. You're from a field which has a really high demand right now, all over the world and including India. If you can get into one or two short-term ...


3

I haven't been on any applications committees, but believe the answer to your core question is that a Math Subject GRE score is unlikely to help an application to a program that does not request it. In the first instance, if a program does not request those scores they probably do not routinely parse them. The score is much more likely to be ignored than it ...


22

(I am a postdoc in research university in the US, regularly supervise undergrads and phd-level students) The most important part is to be brief. Nobody has time or energy to read more than few sentences. If they have time for any student they will likely talk to you in person to figure out details. If they don't have time for students right now, they will ...


10

Because undergraduate research in pure mathematics is usually not worth very much, so most PhD programs don't expect it of applicants.


1

Going through the same process, the way I see it is that the "normal" way to do a PhD straight from undergrad is to take courses for the first year or two, and then find a formal advisor. That being said, I've seen that if there is a very good fit, professors can accept individual students directly to their lab/group as well. So it is not a ...


0

There are a few questions in this post, but I will answer the title question, "For PhD admissions, do you mention who you want to work with in your application?? There is no general answer. It is different in different fields and subfields, and across countries. You should ask an advisor in your field to make sure you are doing what is expected.


1

Most PhD programs in the US (including CS, at least those I have any familiarity with) primarily admit students to a program; faculty advisors are chosen later. These programs also tend to have extensive websites that explain the admissions process in detail, though you might have to dig a bit. For example the CS program at UW-Madison says about admissions ...


2

Yes, there are master studies in Germany where your grades are not very important. In general, there is this systm called numerus clausus (NC for short), which basically tells you which average grade you need to have to be admitted. The NC is dependent on subject and university. The NC is not fixed, but is constantly adjusted dependent on a number of ...


3

Few things to note here. If your application won't be rejected outright, you will be asked about your GPA. And you better show improvement over the past few years. If you've been partying hard instead of putting the time to the books, whoever reviewing your application might let it slide provided you show strong results in the last few years. Things happen, ...


3

This is only a partial answer, since I do not whether it is true that grad schools in Europe or elsewhere make decisions without considering your grades. Hopefully others from different parts of the world can write supplementary answers (or suggest edits to this one). which kind of university do not select the candidates by the grades on undergraduate ...


1

My most successful exam was held a Saturday morning. I had obtained special permission from the chair or the Dean for that. All the students were in the right headspace when they came in: no one had rushed from another class before the start of the exam, no one had to rush to another class at the end of the exam. The result was such a success that there ...


1

Seems like one of the opinion-based questions, though probably just "not friday" (or other culture-based "not giving a damn" day) would be the rule unless you want to be disliked and then discuss with the students. Some will be fine with Mondays, some with early mornings and you won't be able to satisfy everyone with the same utility, ...


4

Wednesdays and Thursdays seem to work the best for me as an undergrad As an undergraduate, I preferred exams on Wednesdays and Thursdays for 2 reasons. First, if I took a long weekend (either take off Friday or Monday), I wouldn't miss it. Secondly, sometimes I'd pick up part time work on weekdays, so I'd study mainly on the weekends - this way I always ...


0

This largely depends on whether you have something useful to do with the left-over lesson if you set the exam on the first session of the week. Two factors that will affect this are: (1) whether you want to separate topics by strict increments of whole numbers of weeks; and (2) whether or not you want to have a final "wrap up" lesson that occurs ...


2

The decision I've made in the math & computing courses I've taught, for about the last two decades, is to give exams at the start of the week. Advantages: This maximizes the amount of time students have to digest material after being introduced at the end of the prior week. (Note that every session has new material; there are no "review days".)...


-1

I've done a lot of this with large groups of trainees in the military (service schools). Ideal, is to do it Friday morning, then work hard and grade it and post results (students WILL stop by!) FRI afternoon. Given your TUE/THU choice, I would opt for the THU. Let them unwind over the weekend. Cry or celebrate or whatever.


6

I prefer to hold my exams on Tuesday (in your example), as that lets me provide more rapid and thorough feedback. I believe it is of extreme usefulness to provide feedback while the students still remember their thought processes during the exam. I work hard to get the exams graded quickly, usually by the evening of the exam or the next morning. I can post ...


45

I'm an undergrad, and I do have a preference, so I will answer based on the information you have given in the question. But note that there are many other external factors, such as your students' class load on both days and any campus events, that will make a difference. All else being equal, I would prefer an exam on Thursday. Students often like to clarify ...


17

For my experience, the biggest factor that students will care about is what days do they have exams in their other classes. If the students have two exams the same day, they won't be able to properly study for either of them. Whether you can arrange this or not depends on how similar their schedules are. E.g. You said you are teaching an upper level social ...


-1

You normally need to contact the person you wish to work with before you start applying for your PhD since you need to make sure they are able to take you on as a student. You also normally need to mention it when you submit your application so the university knows everything is ready for you to start. For your last question, it depends on the area - for ...


1

Absolutely do proceed with publishing. Moreover, if you plan on extending your little collaboration, think of the following - you both have some ideas and something you deem important or true. Arguing these points furthers research, but you both ought to approach that with some constructive ideas. Argument of "I think this is true" - "Nah, ...


2

You describe the adviser's opinion as "very unpopular", from which I infer that he has overstated the importance of his work previously, and that other people in his field know about his tendency to brag. If that's true, then I think you have nothing to worry about. When they see your name along with his on the paper, and then they see his familiar ...


5

I think Andrew's answer is already really helpful, and I simply want to share that when I disagree with my co-authors, I found it helpful to frame the problem as anticipating reviewers' critique. In other words, you can frame it in a way that you are on the same team as your advisor, and you are really just trying to do your due diligence to address ...


7

I originally posted this as a comment, but I think it's closer to an answer and seemed to satisfy the OP. I think the value you will get from publishing this paper, will far outweigh the "costs" of Having an ongoing, difficult argument with your advisor about an opinion that doesn't have a black-and-white factual answer (you are very unlikely to ...


4

A school may give a student who has never taken a course the chance to get credit for it by passing a special exam because the school has no evidence that the student is not competent. A school may refuse a student who has failed a course the chance to get credit for it by passing a special exam because the school has evidence that the student is not ...


5

A test-out is similar to transfer credit. It's a way for new students who clearly know the material to skip to the next course. They may be missing a few things and need to work to catch up, but that's understood; and generally only the better students test-out anyway, so can handle it. In a sense, a test-out is saying this person is not our typical incoming ...


7

There are various exam systems in the world. In our system it has traditionally been the case that you may repeat the exam within the designated exam period if you fail your first try, up to two times (if there are free spots exam terms scheduled. Only if you fail those, you have to retake the class. This should cover those cases that "students that I ...


6

I don't think there are pedagogical reasons operating against your proposal, so much as there are accreditation reasons. One major problem with the practice you propose is that it essentially gives students in courses a second opportunity (and possibly more) to attempt their "final exam" to get credit for the course. This essentially means that ...


2

This is probably a good policy to implement. There are very often cases of students, without any formally equivalent course, using credit by exam to move up (ex: scoring a 5 on an AP Exam without having taken the corresponding AP class (i did this personally at least a dozen times)), in principle we should expect a higher level of competency of someone who ...


-1

A university degree is not simply a certification that the student has learned the content of some courses. It should also indicate that the student is a responsible person and a good citizen. A student who takes a course and chooses to wait until after they failed the course to learn the content appears to be an irresponsible person. Therefore, students ...


41

Short answer: students who fail do not usually have recourse to a placement exam because a short exam cannot test mastery of all the skills taught during a course. When such exams are offered, they are normally offered only to students who have successfully completed an equivalent course; in these cases, the exam is used only to "spot-check" a ...


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