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Making a good slide deck is really, really hard. It is entirely normal that a lecturer needs several years teaching a course to develop the perfect deck. Consider the purpose of the slides: to give the students the best possible education. If your current deck isn't good enough yet, you should really consider using some of the old deck. There's nothing ...


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If you are averaging 3 errors/lecture*, that's too much, especially with typed materials. Makes the course hard to follow and creates a real confusion factor of people using the uncorrected materials in error. Not sure if the solution is to use the previous materials or just tighten up on what you are doing yourself. I suspect there is some way to be ...


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Well, first up be frank with the students and then give them some freeby decimals on their grade as apology because if they study from the mistakes they will get it wrong in the exams (besides the full note you already gave), and to avoid it, start a mistake hunt. Give your students ALL the slides and tell them to analyze them and submit the mistakes they ...


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Everyone makes mistakes. Teachers, students, everyone. It isn't terrible that you make them, but it is good, and can be extremely instructive when you correct them. Your description suggests that you do the right thing here. Proof your slides and make corrections. But also, when mistakes are pointed out in class, not only admit them readily, but work ...


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I suggest talking to your head of dept or equivalent as HR usually have little experience of teaching, the preparation necessary or the effort involved in marking... So department head or equivalent as they should know exactly what you are expected to do at the moment and what the increase is.


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Are your lecturing with a formal contract, or is it just a volunteer activity? Does your name appear on the course syllabus and on the university website? If yes, that would fall into the case of "professore a contratto" (even if just for a part of a course), and I would endorse the translation as as guest lectures. Otherwise, it would seem like an abuse ...


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I pretty strongly suggest that you don't claim a title of any kind unless it is formally conferred. That is, if you want your CV to be credible. But there is a difference between "University Guest Lecturer" and "university guest lecturer". The first seems to be a title, but the latter is just descriptive. You can certainly describe what you do in a CV ...


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A "lecturer" is usually considered an academic title. So if you are just giving an invited talk, that would usually be considered a seminar; if you are invited to teach an occasional 6-week long course, then maybe it could be justified to call yourself a "guest lecturer" for that period. Whether or not you "can" do this is somewhat subjective. You do ...


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I am a lecturer in the UK, and my teaching load is 200 contact hours per year. I think this is higher than average in the UK because our university is post-92 and quite teaching-oriented. This is also (supposedly) lower than average in our university because I have an additional workload allowance for research.


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I recently had a very important interview for a postdoc position. There were two professors in the interview. One of them fell asleep on multiple occasions. What shocked me was he fell asleep after asking a question and while I try to answer his question. I tried my best to keep him up by changing the pitch of my voice and it really helped. I was a ...


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(I'm German as the questions author is too, and studied computer science at FU Berlin.) The situation is less complex than your intuition tells you: It is, on an abstract level, very simple. Much of what happens is nice for various reasons, but not actually relevant. The sole purpose of the presentation is that you, personally, learn to give a good ...


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