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5

is this academic misconduct? That depends. Your thesis is published, just not in a journal. It’s published as part of your alma mater’s repository and anyone can access it, your advisor in particular. Regarding the figures: it really depends on how they did it. If they copied them without citing your thesis that’s pretty clear cut plagiarism which is wrong ...


4

When marking student work I have always told them that if they believe I have made a mistake in the marking then they should identify the error and then discuss it with me. If, after working through the question, it is shown that I have made an error and they should have received a higher grade then their grade is adjusted. If it is found that I made an ...


5

You could consider this not just from an ethical standpoint, but also from a statistical one. I remember I overheard a podcast where the commentator couldn't understand "how could correcting an error in data ever be wrong, if you know it's an error?" They gave the example of looking at temperature data, seeing something was off, finding a 37 entered and ...


3

It is totally fine to give the student the lower grade once you find that thee initial grade was a mistake IF AND ONLY IF this policy was clearly stated beforehand and publically (meaning all the students of this class have been warned). In fact, I would recommend doing this since it would help to prevent students going to you to try to increase their grades ...


5

Let the higher grade stand but point out that it should have been given no points. You do not want to punish the student for coming for help but also want to let them know that what they answered should be given no marks so that they expect it in the future.


12

To me, it is actually odd to see all answers but one say that you should leave the points as is. I do agree however that this situation should be handled somewhere in the policy, shared with the students at the beginning of the course, and this particular instance handled leniently if no such policy exists. When I studied, it was (implicitly) understood for ...


57

You should never penalize a student for taking the time to come to office hours (or whatever) and seeking additional help or clarification. Not only would it make it less likely for that particular student to ever ask you for that type of help again, but it could very well disincentivize other students as well.


6

You should clearly state the policy in the syllabus and verbally on the first day of class, and when you hand back exams. A reasonable policy is that re-grades may well result in a lower grade. In my 7+ years of college teaching, I didn't do that. I would do so today. I found students to be very persistent about getting that extra point, in spite of the ...


167

Let the grade stand, but point out your error. The principle I try to follow is that students shouldn't be negatively affected by faculty mistakes (or that such effects should be minimized). I wouldn't suggest adding an additional assignment to maintain the grade, since this is effectively another kind of penalty. But I would suggest being transparent ...


13

For many of the reasons you state, I would let the original grade stand. I viewed my job as one of teaching, not grading. Overall, the change in the grade will probably be a minor thing, but the effect on the student's psyche should be considered. However, you can also take advantage of the situation to create a teaching moment. It may be too late for this ...


10

The key to answering this question is what the syllabus says. The syllabus is like a contract between the professor and the class describing what happens in different situations that may occur during a term. If the syllabus or departmental guidelines say how to handle the situation, then it makes things easy. (e.g. if you ask for a re-grade in one question, ...


2

While I haven't experienced this exact situation first-hand (or simply don't know what happened to my potential supervisees), I can easily imagine it. In my case, though, the resulting research statement we prepare is typically very much entangled with our lab's ongoing research activities, so I doubt it can be re-used elsewhere. I can understand that a ...


6

A student contacts you and expresses an interest to work with you on your research. The student has funding contingent on your letter of acceptance and your approval of their research statement. Ask the student to prepare a research statement. Tell him/her that you will provide all the necessary resources but that you will not write the statement for them ...


2

It is perfectly normal for students to apply multiple places. You should examine how you are promoting your lab. What are you telling students about why they should work in your lab? If they are going elsewhere, perhaps you are not telling them the right things.


18

Let's flip sides here. Your professors have pointed you to many ideas and useful resources (e.g. textbooks) in the subjects you study. Some years later, you will probably be writing a paper based on the techniques you learnt. Will you credit all your professors in it?


0

I was acknowledged in a colleague’s phd thesis as I showed him how to use the statistcal functions in excel. I did not expect any acknowledgment at all... If you had produced said data set then you may have some case but as it was publically available and others seem to have found it as well then I don’t think you deserve acknowledgment.


47

On more than one occasion, a student has pointed out a resource to me that I am already familiar with. In those situations, I always thank the student but don't always mention that I was familiar with it. I don't lie and say that I hadn't seen it before, but see no reason to bring it up (since doing so might make them feel slightly disappointed). If it is ...


22

You pointed out a dataset and had a 15 minute conversation with your advisor, and now you are expecting credit for it. This certainly does not warrant authorship (even under the most lenient definitions of contribution I can think of), and perhaps not even an acknowledgement. Bringing this up to the department head will not do anything to help since it ...


27

I'm addressing just the first and what seems to be primary question: Is this professor's behavior ethical? and Would I be able to bring this as a complaint to a higher person in the department (since I have email evidence that he did not have knowledge of this data set prior to my informing him). Quite simply, no, I don't think your advisor violated any ...


2

It is very possible that it is unethical, but it would take a bit of analysis to clarify it. Your course professor is probably a good person to adjudicate it. I'd suggest that you take the problem to them, preferably in person. Using other people's work without attribution is plagiarism. Go see the prof.


2

CS/AI perspective: the name on the presentation matters far less than the name on the paper. You are listed as a coauthor on a paper less than 6 months into your PhD, that's a big deal I think. In other words - while not being mentioned during the presentation is annoying and hurtful, I don't think it actually hurts you as much as you think it does. That ...


1

I think you should first meet your advisor,and maybe in second time the other colleague. I would not tell him directly the problem but instead asking a question like "I don't get why I am not mentioned for this work. Is it usual ? Didn't I work enough on the problem ?". And if his answer does not convince you, request that your name appears everytime needed ...


5

It definitely sucks when you feel like you're not getting credit for your work, and in applied math, it is certainly not standard practice to omit mention of PhD students' contributions. In fact, I've seen many presentations where professors and industry leaders show group pictures of their entire lab, and they're proud of the team effort. However, passive ...


0

Well, know this. you can't do anything if the student is just waving his head. you can only warn him/her to pay attention on their jobs; but you can't give zeros to them. because 'just waving the head' isn't a reliable reason. It may the student say I have neckache! (but in fact he/she is cheating) and you can't prove the cheating. you can only assign zeros ...


-1

There is an argument that cheating should be clearly and formally forbidden, but it is not important to enforce that. The reasoning is based on that the student does harm only to himself. While enforcing it is not fundamentally important, it may still be desirable to enforce it, but with lower priority when short on resources. The base assumption may or ...


1

This is a supper difficult problem and is responsible for much of what is wrong with academia. Its definitely not unheard of for a recruiting academic to call contacts at institutions a candidate has been associated with and ask. If you are in Europe, and you are turned down for a job you were sure you were the best candidate for, you can issue a GDPR ...


0

Depending on the contents such emails can of course cause serious damage. For example I once heard of an email sent between graduate schools that went "we've confirmed that so-and-so applicant fabricated his test scores and his recommendation letter is actually written by his wife". Needless to say that was the kiss of death. You are asking about a ...


0

What should students do to protect their own rights? Don't study at corrupt universities. Don't tell corrupt people that you are applying for a job or degree program. Is it likely that some real damage will be caused by such malicious emails? Somebody sending an email like that might send it to the wrong person, but if they send it to the right ...


4

I experienced a related situation when I was supervising a written exam as TA: I caught a student cheating who actually (though probably accidentally) admitted cheating ("I couldn't read anything" - yea but already trying to read other's answers is cheating). When telling my prof, he decided to nevertheless have the exam graded regularly. His explanation: ...


0

I took a quick peek at the chapter on functions in the book you cite. It is available online, of course. I found it to be a rather standard, if formal, presentation of the material. The one thing I quickly noticed is that it refers back to the earlier (Class 11) book. I suspect that there is an assumption that the student has used this series throughout, ...


31

Beer and Circus calls this the "student-faculty non-aggression pact": Faculty provide an easy class and don't look too hard into cheating Students happily take the easy grade and leave the professor free to do research I wouldn't say this is "the rule"; plenty of faculty do an awesome job teaching. But, I'm not surprised to hear your report -- some faculty ...


7

Edit: question has changed. You probably cannot do much now. Once I realized what was happening, I started assigning zeros to the offending students, in accordance with University policy. As a TA, you should have spoken to the professor about the situation before taking any action. Student misconduct is squarely in the professor's area of ...


0

"First and foremost, I would like to thank my advisor's support and guidance. I also want to extend my gratitude to my PhD committee. Finally, I would like to thank the research funding from XXXXX. " These are very typical language used in the Acknowledgement part. Do the similarity check using any anti-plagiarism check software, and see if you'd like to ...


0

I really don't think acknowledgment is part of the academic work, and this part can be very personal and freestyle. I guess nobody really cares about this part. Plus the fact that many people use the same language in this part. All in all, I don't think this is a big deal


2

I had recently been requested by my PI to help with setting up experiments and getting data for the latter part of a research that was to be submitted as a paper. I spent 3 months aggressively working on it along side my own work towards other projects. ... I had, thereafter, spoken to my PI... Oops --- you have made the rookie mistake of beginning work ...


1

I think it is generally accepted that letters of recommendation, and other references, are cherry-picked to use only the good ones. Thus, selection panels are already aware that the absence of negative recommendations is largely due to the filtering mechanism of having the applicant choose their own referees. Panels will also usually notice if there is an ...


2

Would it be fine to let them know that one professor is already willing to accept me to their program? I see no ethical issue with your general desire to network with potential advisors and make a good impression. However, be very careful that you do not misrepresent what you have been told by that professor. In your previous sentence you say that "she ...


1

But what would be your response as an instructor if a student did this? I can't speak for other academics, but I would have no problem with this. Unless there is an instruction in the assignment to the contrary, I do not think it is reasonable to expect the student to refrain from looking at outside materials. (Indeed, one would usually regard it as ...


0

It's hard to believe a field can be completely cut off from the rest of the world and have only 15 active contributors. Even the pariah field of cold fusion has some 100-200 researchers. Granted because cold fusion is such a small field, even 100-200 active researchers might not suffice to find reviewers who have never worked with each other. It's also a ...


7

Even if the field is small, one can usually find referees in cognate fields with no conflicts: presumably papers by these groups have a bibliography that extends beyond these groups, else the interest is overly narrow and the paper can be rejected as such. (Aside: the handling editor is not necessarily a “he”.)


2

This is something you should ask the instructor in person. Especially if the instructor is a reasonable person, they will want to know that you had no chance to complete the assignment. Ideally you tell them before (some profs have office hours), or at the latest when you hand in the assignment. Tell them what you did. Then they may decide to accept, reject ...


2

This depends on the rules of the course and has no general answer. For some courses and for some assignments within them, this would be expected. In others, forbidden. Only the instructor can give you guidance. But, you did the right thing in citing it. You were honest. Also, you learned something, which was the point of the assignment. But perhaps you ...


5

Publishing this result independently is questionable from an ethical perspective, especially because it sounds like: (1) you would not have been working on this problem without having read their manuscript as part of your refereeing duties; (2) the result is your justification, but it is for their claim, which they thought of; (3) you raised this issue ...


1

People have already though about the this. The American Statistical Association has guideline for reproducible results (here). Reproducibility is enhanced by following best current practices, including: a. Ideally, exclusive use of publicly available data. However if the research domain does not allow for publically available data for widely ...


3

Its totally normal practice for patient data to be allowed to be stored only on properly secured, regulated and monitored servers. In my field (genomics), databases exist where researchers can deposit anonymized patient data, that is not "publically" available, but can be accessed by users that can demonstrate that they have good reason to use the data, ...


2

This is really tough to approach. On the one hand, it’s incredibly hard to prove this (also since there’s no clear incentive for the professor to do this). On the other hand, you stand to lose a lot if you’re wrong. That said, paraphrasing Hanlon’s Razor: Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence. Your professor might ...


5

To my eyes, your examples fall into two very different categories. When researchers are in conflict about who did something first, that is typically known as a priority dispute. When the stakes are high, these can be extremely bitter: see, for example, the fight over the discovery of Haumea or the fight over CRISPR patents. The problem here is that it's ...


5

Yes, but not in the way you're thinking. No, covering up a given researcher's misdeeds because their research is so important isn't acceptable under academic ethics, both under deontological ethics, but also under utilitarian ethics: almost all research is incremental in nature, with the potential direct human benefit being very small. Things like curing ...


1

Deontological and utilitarian ethics usually lead to the same course of action, so the premise of the question is incorrect. Usually, both forms of ethics "have a place." Your examples of utilitarian courses of action that break the rules are not actually the best way to achieve the desired result. They are not utilitarian.


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