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12 votes

Best practices for citing a reference you've found an error in

You should not cite the result and do nothing; the reader would then assume the original paper is correct. Beyond that, I would suggest you do whatever the authors of the original paper would like. ...
Alexander Woo's user avatar
0 votes

How do I mitigate my group project members plagiarizing off me and taking advantage of me?

I'm late to the question, but for anyone else in this situation, there is always the option of anonymously emailing or writing to the professor expressing your concerns with the division of labor ...
Mentalist's user avatar
5 votes

Academic careerism: How can there be biased research or dishonest inquiry in theoretical hard sciences?

I'm going to attempt to answer this question as if it is asked in good faith, although quoting people like Ben Shapiro suggests a definite agenda here. Here are a few ways that academic careerism can ...
JoshuaZ's user avatar
  • 5,920
4 votes

Is it considered cheating to use answers I remember from videos I studied?

It is not uncommon that the exam problems are taken from textbooks or copied from the exam materials from a few years ago. Thus, if you encounter problems that you have already see, this might be a ...
Roger V.'s user avatar
  • 1,274
49 votes

Is it considered cheating to use answers I remember from videos I studied?

No, this is not cheating. It just means you did a great job studying. On most tests that I give, there will be at least a few questions that the students (those who are paying attention) know will be ...
David White's user avatar
  • 6,311
8 votes

Is it considered cheating to use answers I remember from videos I studied?

No ethical problem it sounds like. The nature of the exam type is well known. That nearly identical questions showed up just means they did a good job prepping you. That said, if you do feel not great ...
JoshuaZ's user avatar
  • 5,920
9 votes

I have good results from a project that my advisor told me not to do and refused to help me with. Do I have to make them a co-author?

If he did no work on the paper then he should not be a coauthor. That said, it may not be in your best interest to insist on the ethical course of action. At this point in your career you do not want ...
Ethan Bolker's user avatar
  • 36.5k
3 votes

I have good results from a project that my advisor told me not to do and refused to help me with. Do I have to make them a co-author?

Is it fair to put his name: perhaps not. Can you get away not putting his name? Best way to find out: tell him you want to submit, ask him if he wants to be a co-author. Second best way: send him a ...
fmath's user avatar
  • 147
1 vote

Coauthors rewrote and published "abandoned" project without my knowledge

You should have been acknowledged. it happens that you may think what you contributed was crucial, but the authors think differently. In this case it can be a problem, or an opportunity. Reaching out ...
Markus Petz's user avatar
2 votes

Coauthors rewrote and published "abandoned" project without my knowledge

It's hard to account for academic norms. Your expectations don't seem to have been met, they're not unreasonable, but there is more grey in the scenario than is perhaps obvious. Some in this thread ...
DAM's user avatar
  • 31
-1 votes

Coauthors rewrote and published "abandoned" project without my knowledge

Ideas are cheap, seeing them through is what counts. Lesson to learn? Next time you initiate/agree to a preliminary collaboration that you think has value, then see it through to a conclusion or let ...
R1NaNo's user avatar
  • 6,826
6 votes

Coauthors rewrote and published "abandoned" project without my knowledge

Whether you should have been invited to be a co-author, acknowledged, or whether they were perfectly in the right to move on to do a related but independent follow-up project on their own really ...
xLeitix's user avatar
  • 135k
-4 votes

Coauthors rewrote and published "abandoned" project without my knowledge

It, unfortunately, happens all the time. Definitely reach out and defend your work as best you can by sticking up for yourself. But if it doesn't mean a publication later on, then just see it as a ...
hack 91372's user avatar
3 votes

Should I use an author's code made available on request to help retract their highly cited paper?

This is Science. We publish results to share knowledge, and as a check. Put aside speculation as to motive. Ask a polite question. You got an unexpected result using the data and code kindly provided ...
Preston L. Bannister's user avatar
3 votes

Should I use an author's code made available on request to help retract their highly cited paper?

Be aware with how you think of the original authors. In your post you suggest a manipulation trick, which is a serious accusation. Given that they provided you with the materials readily suggests an ...
Arnout Fischer's user avatar
2 votes

Should I use an author's code made available on request to help retract their highly cited paper?

As long as you don't act with the intention of getting their paper retracted, but rather having the result corrected by whatever legal means necessary you are morally in the clear. A note on Edit 2, ...
Spodeian's user avatar
2 votes

Should I use an author's code made available on request to help retract their highly cited paper?

Write to the author(s) who's code you spotted an error with. Inform them of your finding. Importantly, CC the editor of the journal the paper was published in while also in the body letting the author(...
Xirtam Esrevni 's user avatar
8 votes

Should I use an author's code made available on request to help retract their highly cited paper?

I'm a senior professor in physics. I disagree with those who say to ignore your advisor's advice. Not because they are the boss or always right, but because you and they are collaborators and partners ...
Michael's user avatar
  • 81
3 votes

Should I use an author's code made available on request to help retract their highly cited paper?

Sounds like a complicated and annoying situation. Thankfully, the answer to your question is really easy: You contact the editor and make a case for why you think the conclusions of the paper are ...
Paul Costea's user avatar
16 votes

Should I use an author's code made available on request to help retract their highly cited paper?

It's normal to make mistakes. I make them, you make them, everybody does. Pointing out others possible mistakes must be polite, friendly, and kind, because thats the way you would like to be threated ...
Fabio Novelli's user avatar
12 votes

Should I use an author's code made available on request to help retract their highly cited paper?

You can comment on the paper at PubPeer.
Lurker's user avatar
  • 415
6 votes

Should I use an author's code made available on request to help retract their highly cited paper?

Let’s start by assuming the authors are well intentioned and have made an honest mistake, and that you are completely correct that it is a mistake in their analysis which invalidates the large ...
jfmrod's user avatar
  • 61
1 vote

Can I present an article at a conference, if it has previously been put on arxiv and sent to a journal?

You absolutely need to refer to the journal's guidelines! It may change from journal to journal, e.g., in computer science it would typically not be allowed, but CS tents to give conferences a lot ...
Pronte's user avatar
  • 1,213
6 votes

Should I use an author's code made available on request to help retract their highly cited paper?

First a bit banter. Sadly, this is the sad truth about academic research. Peer review system is flawed and will never be able to sort adulterated results from the real ones. First of all it would take ...
Cem Kalyoncu's user avatar
  • 1,215
3 votes

Should I use an author's code made available on request to help retract their highly cited paper?

What would be the best course of action in this case? In terms of your thesis defense I am not sure any action is needed. It does make an interesting story, and you might relate it during your ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 3,210
24 votes
Accepted

Should I use an author's code made available on request to help retract their highly cited paper?

Your advisor is wary of the harm that could come from making any comment, and my inclinations would run the same way, but there is also harm in leaving things as they are. You say you spent months ...
Significance's user avatar
  • 6,953
58 votes

Should I use an author's code made available on request to help retract their highly cited paper?

I think both you and your supervisor are confused. On one hand, you do not retract papers as a third party. The journal does, or the authors do. You can criticize existing papers. This does not ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
  • 119k
1 vote

How to convince co-authors it is unethical to include false research citations in "working paper" being submitted to a conference?

In a comment under the question, David White pointed out that a link I had provided, also in a comment, had died.The linked question and its answer had been deleted by "Community [bot]" ...
Andreas Blass's user avatar
1 vote

How to convince co-authors it is unethical to include false research citations in "working paper" being submitted to a conference?

This question was asked a long time ago, but remains on the unanswered queue. The comments make it clear that the OP wanted "actual documentation that knowingly submitting incorrect statements or ...
David White's user avatar
  • 6,311

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