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1

This is probably not the older article that you are looking for, but a colleague of mine published an article that shows how to identify the most relevant literature using free biblilometric tools such as VOSviewer. That is, by beginning with a topic search on a citation database (e.g. Scopus or Web of Science), you can identify the most relevant body of ...


1

The lack of research funding as SSimon mention seems to the most likely reason for a poor research culture and hence Indian based journals. There is a well worn track of academics being trained overseas and returning. This approach however means that there is a poor academic culture based in India probably. India’s investment in research is a measly 0.62 ...


2

Since more eyes means catching more mistakes, better word choices for a wider readership, and overall more awareness of what's a good idea, I'm wondering if it is even good for science to publish solo-author work. I think you are confusing two issues here. One is the writing -- mistakes, word choices, formatting, organization, etc. As you say "more eyes" ...


3

The vast majority of published research papers don't advance research or only very marginally, whether from single or multiple authors. The only recognized way to evaluate the quality of a research paper, i.e. to evaluate its potential for advancing research in general, is the peer-review process. Since the peer-review process does not care at all about the ...


7

This article in Nature reinforces the anecdotal answers, although it doesn't focus on single authors precisely: "Large teams develop and small teams disrupt science and technology." I guess the best a single author could hope for is to introduce "disruptive" innovation, like Shannon, Einstein, Nash, etc.


-2

Assume that you are not a genius (Einstein, Nash, as mentioned in other answer). If you can able to write the whole paper, in particular a decent paper (starting from ideas, implementation, analysis, and discussion) by your own, excellent, you can survive in this world, in fact, you have a good time ahead. Once you wrote this paper as a single author, ...


12

This paper by C. E. Shannon in 1948 was the founding work of the whole field of information theory, which deals with the ultimate limits on reliable communication over arbitrary channels and which today still occupies thousands of people worldwide. That said, the average number of authors per paper has steadily increased from about 1.5 in 1940 to about 5.4 ...


8

do single-author papers benefit scientific research as a whole? Well, yes. Albert Einstein had several single-author papers https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Einstein#Publications John Nash wrote the most influential paper in game theory on his own: https://www.pnas.org/content/36/1/48 So, if the question is "are there examples of influential single-...


-2

Key here is that awards with identity requirements, gender or otherwise, may hurt the level of accomplishment assessed by the individual, and others, even as they have positive effects on the status and abilities of the aggregate minority group they support. Often, there is some lessening of achievement associated with being awarded in a subcategory. The ...


-3

Do awards with gender identity requirements help or hurt the minorities they intend to support? In general they seem to help an individual of "minority" status, while giving the stigma of all "minorities" in certain fields or with certain funding being due to that status rather than their work standing on their own. It also gives a lot of "minorities" ...


13

I applaud your friend for refusal to participate on ethical grounds. I think your second question can be answered in the negative. But not making a public statement leaves the (unfortunate) status quo intact. The first question however is, at this time, pretty opinion based and some research might actually help settle the question. It isn't my field, so it ...


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