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3

Depending on what you teach, following may be helpful for more student engagement. Interactive engagement - Having group discussions for about 10 minutes with random groups in each sessions. Student interaction may improve as groups will be random every time. Everyone would get to know the class & may be engaging more with each other. Iterative Learning ...


4

Play the "parents" card I lived in Taiwan 11 years and have seen many sides of this. Yes, part of the challenge is about foreign students regardless of the country they are from or in. They tend to be from families with enough money to pay the higher cost. That leads to some "affluenza". In Taiwan, high school is the hard part and university is a breeze. I ...


2

First, you need to understand the cultural differences. Teachers in Asian countries are generally regarded as an authority and someone you would not question. Having said that, language also plays a vital role in foreign student's progress. If students have problems with language (including accent, pronunciation, grammar and fear of judgment if they have to ...


30

I do think your first point is a little strange as in my experience (American university, CS), the Asian students always attended and were often the ones that stayed after during the additional review time. I have much more experience with Chinese students so I will tailor my answer to them. Avoiding doing work/learning - This can be attributed to many ...


15

I hate to answer by stereotyping, so I'll do my best to avoid it. That said, there are differences between people in different parts of the world. Some are easy to see and anticipate, once you know to look for them, and others are much harder. Some people, for example, have cultural mores about open criticism. They may take great offense as being called ...


58

I teach at a university in Asia and I could say the exact same thing about our European/American exchange students. Quite simply, exchange students have very different incentives from regular students. They often convert their grades to a simple pass/fail on their transcripts so they just need to pass the class (we get students from very reputable ...


0

This question is not of interest to this academic community. This is a opinion-based question. However, since I work in the field of Machine Learning and Computer Vision, I can certainly say that your thoughts are in line with your future goals. There is a lot of scope of applications of HPCs to simulation of computer vision models that are essentially built ...


1

There are vast differences between the different countries in Europe when it comes to this issue. You could compile a list of countries that you would be interested in doing your PhD, then look at the relevant universities there and what they offer for PhD students. For instance in the Scandinavian countries (Sweden, Norway, Denmark), you could find a paid ...


0

Europe is not a country so PhD policies vary greatly from one country to the other. With that being said, because you mentioned northern Europe: As far as Germany is concerned, if you do a PhD in a public university (which are the best ones) you do get paid.


1

You go to their website, find a job posting, and apply. Example of a PhD Research Fellowship at the University of Oslo. Not all positions are free, and not every PhD student is paid. You'll have to look.


1

Neither of these fields is my area, so I'll mention an orthogonal path: you could become an expert in something else (e.g., statistics, game theory, programming -- right now the hot thing is machine learning / deep learning, but who know where we'll be in 10+ years), then you can apply that toolkit to both space programs and biomedical programs (whether ...


0

Space Medicine is actually a thing, but I suspect that the opportunities are limited. And I doubt that it is very connected to astrobiology.


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