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6

NPTEL is the best bet. It is a MOOC by the Government of India, where online courses are offered by various Indian universities, including the IITs and the Indian Institute of Science. It is similar to Coursera and such in the sense that you watch videos and complete weekly assignments. You can register yourself as a student through this link and browse ...


0

I'll address the scenarios you described in a comment: sometimes I can see explicitly who contributed to or edited a document (as in Google Docs). This sounds like an unreliable method to determine who did what. Maybe the students had a meeting to work on an assignment collaboratively and only one of them uploaded the resulting edit? Maybe one student ...


0

The students, and you, should know how work will be graded before the assignment is assigned. If you did not tell them that their grade will be based on factors other than the quality of the submitted work, then it is unfair to grade them on such factors. This is true regardless of your professor's requirements. On the other hand, if you tell them now that ...


2

I suggest that you grade "the project" for its value and assign every student the same grade. If any student objects, refer them to the instructor. This recognizes an important fact. You may not recognize all "contributions", but the students might value some things more than others. Not every student needs to contribute to a "team&...


4

This is a great idea, and at my university people would generally be delighted if you create a public math resource of this type. In terms of ethics, I don’t see a problem as long as you don’t start making the web materials a required source for your own students, since that would put you in a conflict of interest. Also, if you use university-owned equipment ...


4

This answer is based out of my own experience as a teaching assistant. I didn't do much to respond to complaints because I'm a TA, not the professor. Since this is the professor's course, I defer to them when things like this happen (they generally have better decisions). I also generally feel that I'm not the one to set the rules; the professor is. Students ...


3

What will be most useful for them going forwards? Ultimately the test of any change is whether it helps the students learn the subject. Your course is not an island to itself - as an undergraduate program, it's delivering essential skills that will let your students become professional engineers/scientists. If they haven't learnt this, they will fail to ...


6

Your aim is to help educate better, in broad terms. So you need to look at everything in a class, primarily through that lens. What will help students best gain from the course? Is this going to help students become competent at the required material? That sort of thing. What you're doing now, is more "of they want it and it doesn't sound too awful, ...


4

This is mostly the instructor's problem. I host tutorials using power point slides. You're using a non-interactive teaching technique. That's not very helpful to students. tutorial interaction disappeared altogether The instructor should have required tutorials to be interactive, and that interaction should contribute to student's grades. Then they ...


55

The game is: you listen, but then, you decide. Just because students don't like something, you do not have to do what they ask. Check whether what they say has merit, if so, you can promise to change for next year (or for the current if there is enough flexibility). Well-designed courses often cannot be massively adapted on the fly. I always explain to ...


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