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9

I might as well weigh in on this, with all of the caveats mentioned by everyone else. IMO, the most telling sentence in your question is this: It may sound silly, but is it me being too respectful backfiring and seen as condescending by female students? Let me reframe this: it's possible that you're trying too hard to be respectful to your women ...


3

The sample is not independent so I think that you cannot say much about statistical significance. One group of friends might be of size 20 and one person complaining about you might change the whole group's perception. There is the bias of thinking that what is easy or intuitive for you is the same for others. The genders have their differences in learning. ...


19

I am a female student from Japan and will humbly attempt to answer your question, although I have never attended your lectures if you never taught in my country. Subjectively, I find that females are on average better at explaining things than males are, but I strongly suspect that males subjectively find that the opposite is true. This has nothing to do ...


28

I have posted this as a comment, which has been referenced twice in the discussion; since it now has been moved to chat, I'm reposting it here for better visibility: Can you check the major/minor composition of your course by gender? If it is significantly skewed, you may have your answer there. I'm pretty sure students will evaluate a (well-taught) class ...


4

Unless you are an experienced statistician with access to a good amount of studies and/or a good knowledge of the results of meta-analysis in respect to performance evaluations, please refrain from reading anything into this. By education and cultural background, female students may have a different scale of what the evaluation scale means (when women rate ...


5

Ask others in your department who have taught the same course whether their scores had a gender difference. If there is an administrator (Vice Chair, say) who keeps records of student ratings, discuss with them. It may turn out that this is a known phenomenon; if so it is nothing to do with you. It still may be something of concern, but something for ...


30

It could be almost any of the suggestions already suggested, but my hunch from the information provided (in particular, that the complaints "are mostly about the organization of the teaching or the course being demanding"), is that it may tend to be one of two things: Communication style. You may organize and explain ideas in a style that more typical men ...


16

I'm going to do a bit of a frame challenge on this one: before going down this path, you should actually make sure that there's actually meaningfulness to the disparity. Let me give you an example that happened to me personally. I just started a new job, and within a few months, we had an All-IT meeting. The company had conducted a survey of ...


5

Can you get the overall statistics? Specifically: Is there any bias observed assuming all answers asked for all courses (at your deaprtment / faculty / university / field? Is there any bias observed assuming all answers of your students? How are you measured? 1-5 stars, 1-10 points? There are zounds of way how to interpret such scales. Can you get ...


25

One possible way to investigate this further is to ask a trusted colleague to observe one of your classes and give feedback on that. This can be done privately, outside of any officially documented peer-review requirement (which may relax you both and give more honest feedback.) Some people also video record a lecture and watch it with a colleague for ...


66

Here are a few possible lines of thought. Of course, we would need much more data and context to know if any were actually the case. Don't forget the null hypothesis. If you carried out this survey for other lecturers (of each gender) for the same course, other courses, other departments, other universities, would we indeed find that your result is ...


117

I would hesitate to draw any conclusions whatsoever from one semester. File this away, and check whether it becomes a pattern, and if it does then think about it then when you have more information. Although there's not a single incident that you're aware of, I wouldn't be at all surprised if something being "amplified among a group of students" is exactly ...


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