132

Being a good teacher and being a good researcher are distinct skills. If someone has a job that requires both skills, they should be being evaluated on both.


117

I would hesitate to draw any conclusions whatsoever from one semester. File this away, and check whether it becomes a pattern, and if it does then think about it then when you have more information. Although there's not a single incident that you're aware of, I wouldn't be at all surprised if something being "amplified among a group of students" is exactly ...


71

Report the student and his problem behavior to your honor council or academic conduct officer, as appropriate at your institution and let it be their problem. At most schools, your responsibility as an instructor is to report suspected cases of misconduct, not to form a final judgement.


66

Here are a few possible lines of thought. Of course, we would need much more data and context to know if any were actually the case. Don't forget the null hypothesis. If you carried out this survey for other lecturers (of each gender) for the same course, other courses, other departments, other universities, would we indeed find that your result is ...


54

If you can prove that 38% of the students where not even invited, you should go to the relevant committee and challenge the evaluation. Demand that they either invite the rest of the students as well (if it is still possible to reach them and the evaluation is not too long ago) or that they declare the evaluation null and void because it was not done ...


42

Is this typically done at most American universities, irrespective of a professor's age, status or fame? Yes. It's likely a required process of the administration, as negotiated in the faculty contract. It's probably not something your department has any say over; and in a case such as you describe, the resulting product is likely to be mostly ignored. ...


41

Evaluations only tell you whether your students liked you or not. Your main goal, however, is to have students learn the material and develop their intellectual skills, not to have them like you. Have experienced colleagues sit in on your classes and give you feedback, and have colleagues look at your assessments and the students' performance on them (with ...


40

In my experience, people don't generally put teaching evaluation scores on a CV at all, regardless of what they are.


40

Yes, you should raise this with the department, either with the Undergraduate Director or the Chair. The problem is not Prof. Johnson's unfamiliarity with the LMS--as a new faculty member, that is understandable. But you should restate what you said here about not teaching the assigned material. You mention online quizzes that were given to him. Are they ...


35

He was a one year contract with the university, and was hired a mere two weeks prior to the semester beginning. This situation suggests that the university was unable to hire anyone better prepared to teach. They probably know that already. I doubt speaking to the department chair will make a difference.


30

It could be almost any of the suggestions already suggested, but my hunch from the information provided (in particular, that the complaints "are mostly about the organization of the teaching or the course being demanding"), is that it may tend to be one of two things: Communication style. You may organize and explain ideas in a style that more typical men ...


29

It is a good thing you had two colleagues present. As far as the cheating part is concerned, it is now time to escalate (in the bureaucratic sense of the word) the process, that is, hand it over to someone higher up the hierarchy. Ideally, this is someone or some committee who is specifically appointed for that purpose. But when that is not the case, discuss ...


28

I'm in Australia, and from my experience, almost every unit is evaluated every semester that it runs in pretty much all Australian universities. There might be a few exceptions, but this is just standard practice. The standard survey consists of a bunch of closed ended questions and then some open ended questions for more qualitative feedback. From this ...


28

I have posted this as a comment, which has been referenced twice in the discussion; since it now has been moved to chat, I'm reposting it here for better visibility: Can you check the major/minor composition of your course by gender? If it is significantly skewed, you may have your answer there. I'm pretty sure students will evaluate a (well-taught) class ...


25

Off the top of my head, things that are different about a lecture rather than a presentation: You're not simply relating stuff you did to your peers : You're teaching people who know less about the topic than you do (even if you only know what you got from the textbook when preparing!). So think carefully about the intended audience, and how to explain the ...


25

One possible way to investigate this further is to ask a trusted colleague to observe one of your classes and give feedback on that. This can be done privately, outside of any officially documented peer-review requirement (which may relax you both and give more honest feedback.) Some people also video record a lecture and watch it with a colleague for ...


24

In general, quotes should always be edited as little as possible. The only changes you should make are: Truncations to remove sections of quotes that aren't relevant for your purposes. Edits to fit the grammatical structure of the existing sentence. Correcting small errors in the original text. However, any changes to the quotation must be clearly ...


24

I've had similar situations arise many times in my 20+ years of teaching, and I have gotten confessions 100% of the time. Everything is easier with a confession -- you don't need to worry about a trial or dispute later, the student doesn't get mad at you, etc. My technique: Establish rapport with the student(s), through casual conversation about ...


20

You should expect that your teaching evaluations will be available to any faculty members in the department. The lecturer for the class will certainly have access (and this is important for you, if you subsequently look for an academic position; your evaluations will help them to write you a letter of recommendation addressing your teaching). Other faculty ...


19

Ben Norris's answer is excellent but I would add one additional point to it. When you are asking for constructive feedback from the students, you must do so in a way that students feel completely comfortable that their honesty is not going to come back to bite them. At the end of every semester, I email all of my students a web-based survey with some open ...


19

It depends on what they are evaluating, and how. I studied at a university in a mess of a country that was recovering from a period of war. The educational system was not just depressingly dated, it was also falling apart at the seams. Enthusiasts were trying to reform the system, and one of the bigger pushes in the right direction was achieved through ...


19

This is an excellent question, for faculty as well as students! How important are these points in evaluating the teaching capabilities of a student? Obviously this varies significantly in different departments and institutions, but in my experience, the scores themselves are not that important. My department does pay attention to these numbers when ...


19

I am a female student from Japan and will humbly attempt to answer your question, although I have never attended your lectures if you never taught in my country. Subjectively, I find that females are on average better at explaining things than males are, but I strongly suspect that males subjectively find that the opposite is true. This has nothing to do ...


18

I don't think a modicum of cherry-picking is a bad thing in this regard. What you need to send is a set of teaching evaluations that describes what is significant about your teaching -- the Great teacher! comments aren't particularly worth it, but the Dr. X constantly provided clear examples of the material, and it made the difficult topics more ...


18

The professor is being treated as a day laborer, as most adjuncts are these days, he lacks direction because he doesnt care, does not have to care and neither does the university. Hes being treated as a disposable napkin. His contract ends in 1 year, what does he care? There was a time when adjuncts were supposed to be professionals with professional lives ...


16

I'm going to do a bit of a frame challenge on this one: before going down this path, you should actually make sure that there's actually meaningfulness to the disparity. Let me give you an example that happened to me personally. I just started a new job, and within a few months, we had an All-IT meeting. The company had conducted a survey of ...


15

Here are two things you can do: 1) Since the comments you mention have to do with the way you answer questions in class, perhaps it is time to explain your approach. Sometimes all you need to do is explain at the beginning of a course why you are doing certain things. For example, if you do not like giving full answers to questions so that your students ...


15

I have to disagree with the older answers from Buzz and Brian Borchers. Access to teaching evaluations is a matter of individual university policy. At my (flagship public American) university, teaching evaluations are (by default) strictly confidential to the person being evaluated; whether that person is an instructor or a teaching assistant makes no ...


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