109

Unless you have some direct relationship with his father, this is not something we'd normally do in US, UK, or Australian culture. (I'm not sure if it's the same everywhere in the EU.) A polite option might be to tell your advisor something like "I'm very sorry to hear about your father, please let me know if there is anything I can do." If your advisor is ...


63

I'll give the same answer as Allure, but for a very different reason. Not only is it common, but most people won't notice it. And of the few that do, fewer yet would think it an important enough issue to bother with. "Egad, this person misspelled a word. Horrors." Nope, it ain't gonna happen. But, you also need to be assured that no single thing, ...


50

As other people have mentioned, the problem with 16 schools is that a professor cannot, either truthfully or operationally provide customized letters to 16 different schools. By "customization" I mean more than changing the name of the school and program. Good letters of rec use professor's familiarity with their field to speak to applicants' specific ...


33

Tell your professor of your plan to apply to 16 schools, and let them decide if it’s too much. They are capable of making their own decisions without you doing that on their behalf. It’s nice of you to worry about the professor’s well-being, but unnecessary, and counterproductive if it ends up undermining your own success. And as for the professor ...


29

The situation is the same in the EU as it is in the US. You should generally not go visit unless you are close to your supervisor's father personally. If your supervisor has let you know about their father's situation, a reply similar to the one in Geoffrey Brent's answer is a good way to go. If you want to show polite interest, you can after some time ...


18

I agree with other answers. Having said that, if the father does pass away, and if it is in the same town, you may want to go to the memorial service or funeral, as this is a way to show support for the living. Going with a group of students would also be fine.


18

No. Check this paper out. As of time of writing Google Scholar says it's received 3871 citations, which puts it well into the upper echelon of papers. And yet on page 50 there is ... To diagionalize the remaining four dimensions, we transform to a new set of variables Obvious typo, but it's far from uncommon and it doesn't stop people from reading and ...


11

I'll give a different answer, which is deliberately not an answer to the exact question you asked. Can you fix it? Can you overwrite your initial CV on the web application form, or ask the admissions administrator to replace it for you, or something like that? If so, then you should fix it, because you're trying to present your best self with your ...


8

Several countries in southern Europe have lunch, dinner and working times shifted toward later hours with respect to northern European countries or the US. For instance, in my university, in Italy, lectures run from 8:30 am to 7:00 pm, both for undergraduate and graduate classes, and in the past I also taught up to 8 pm. Other universities have similar ...


7

Europe is not a country, but a continent. There is a lot of variability inside Europe. So no, it is not a European thing. All Bachelor's, Master's and PhD courses I teach (in Germany) are between 10:00 ad 16:45. About 15 years ago I taught a course (in the Netherlands) in the evening for a part-time Bachelor's program aimed at people who work besides their ...


6

In my experience, “guaranteed funding” means that (depending on field) you will be either working for a PI who has grant money to pay you or working as a TA (with the possible exception of your first year, where their may be general department support while you find an advisor). Because graduate stipends are typically on a pay scale, working on a grant can ...


6

Unlike the other answers, I do not think the professor's time spent customizing is an issue. Customizing a letter does not take that long. Professors have lots of practice. Submitting it can take longer due to low quality submission systems. But writing the first letter is most of the work. The issue is that only one of these letters is worth submitting:...


6

For the purpose of admissions it's unlikely to have any impact. If this were to support a job application, where a recruiter might have 500 resumes in front of them, and 95% of those resumes end up in the trash after one pass, you want to make every effort to prevent yours from being trashed, and every effort should be put into making sure your ...


5

Yes, it is an oversimplification overall. First, state laws vary about who can teach, and some laws apply to private schools as well. You may need certification or not to be hired, but in some places you will need to seek it afterwards. Most schools need to be certified by the state themselves, so the rules need to be followed. Whether having been a TA or ...


4

If you feel like congratulating your professor, go ahead and do it. He might appreciate it, or in the worst case he will ignore because he has too many emails in his inbox. But I cannot imagine a scenario where the professor would take such a congratulation email negatively. As with most emails to busy people: keep the email short and to the point. Just one ...


4

It's not unheard of for someone to be unable to attend a conference after having their work accepted. This can happen for any number of reasons that may be seen as having varying levels of validity in someone else's eyes, ranging from "death in the family" to "I have better things to do". I don't see a compelling reason to open yourself up to such value ...


4

If you are in good terms with your PI and you have weekly meetings with her, it is probably best if you bring up the topic in your next meeting. If "lab politics" are really involved (which need not be the case), it is unlikely that she will provide more information through email. If she had told you that she would have funding and space for you all, it is ...


3

You can ask him, of course. But the problem with asking for too many is that you will get a general letter sent to all, rather than a letter tailored to each given position. I realize this is hard if all schools have similar deadlines, but if possible you should spread it out over time, with your professor's OK. You can also have a different professor ...


3

No, you shouldn't go to see your advisor's father, as per other answers. The western equivalent is the sympathy card sent to your advisor (if you were very close to your advisor and had met the father in person before, you might send one to the father, too). A card with a short, handwritten note expressing your sympathy for the difficult time your advisor ...


3

Two Bs in significantly harder, graduate level classes will not harm your chances of admission much if at all. Your GPA will only take a very slight dip from them (assuming your other marks are high) and, really, you did fine for your level. Remember that you are a whole package, not a just GPA. Write a good statement of purpose, work on doing well on the ...


2

You can check the portal web sites to see if they offer a chance to revise. If none is visible you might ask if you can find a contact email on the site. Otherwise I think you are out of luck. If the statement is good maybe the raised eyebrows won't matter in the final decision.


2

what should I do? No action is necessary.


2

I must offer a somewhat different answer. I will add that I agree with other answers that it is atypical, but we don’t know your relationship with your advisor or their family. This said, the following is going to assume you haven’t met their father. I disagree that you should absolutely avoid doing this and therefore must present that POV. Depending on ...


2

I would also agree with your gut feeling in this particular case. I can, however, think of a scenario where a declined award/scholarship should be included on your CV. In countries where you pay to study at a university, you can apply for scholarships/postgraduate awards/student funding. There is often a limit on how much funding an individual can accept. So,...


2

Just say thank you and send best wishes for the health of his father in law. Nothing more is needed. Three is no need to feel bad about your request. It is perfectly normal and natural.


2

Seems to me like a long shot. There are a lot of obstacles. But first, few secondary schools require a doctorate to teach. So, what is your real goal? The doctorate? Secondary teaching? Next, you won't have much of a life if you try it. Think 80 hour weeks for a couple of years. A doctorate doesn't often get easier after you pass comps. Just the ...


2

I am interested in doing a PhD from a third tier school in Electrical Engineering Ranked about in the 60's in North America. In my field, companies will only hire from Top 20 schools. I would like to stay in academia after graduating after being in industry for a few years. Assuming all of the above are true, then clearly this is a bad idea, ...


2

There are two main causes for incorrect spelling: You made a mistake, a typo, or you didn't know how to spell the word correctly. "mercandising" seems to be a typo. That's much more forgivable. Getting "your", and "you're" wrong would be more of a problem. I did review someone's CV before it was sent out and noticed "wether" was used instead of "whether". ...


1

It varies, so you need to check with the program. For example, if the grad students are unionized at that institution, the CBA might specify that the PI can't sweeten a grad student's base stipend out of a grant. There might also be distinctions between what's permissible during the academic year and what's permissible during the summer.


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