62

While we cannot conclusively determine whether or not you would have deserved co-authorship, for the reasons others mentioned (number of authors on the paper, the time you invested into this project, etc.), it seems likely that you should have been one - or at the very least acknowledged. Now, let me share with you my hunch why that never happened, and how ...


62

This sort of behavior by a professor is poor pedagogical technique and, in many cultures, poor etiquette. It is not misconduct and it is not rule breaking. If you are a student and a professor acts this way, you can criticise the behavior in any anonymous teaching evaluations. Otherwise, ignore it and move on. Receiving criticism, including bad quality ...


35

If your undergraduate lectures were perfectly predictable, following the book exactly, and you showed up perfectly prepared to each one, then they were actually completely useless. You could have just stayed home and read the book yourself! At the graduate level, the best practice is to ask the professor for good references, both at the start of the course, ...


30

This could be done in both a clumsy, rude way, and in a reasonable way. The apparent anonymity of the student in the critique is a step in the right direction. In terms of "what should you do?", um, well, not too much. The anonymity means that there was no public shaming... Yes, there is a shock in seeing one's work even anonymously discussed as a ...


25

Your “friend” is no friend to you at all, and behaved unethically in promising you coauthorship and making other promises that he has not kept, and that it’s not clear he had any intention of keeping. The other answers analyze at length whether you being a coauthor makes sense or not, but that seems beside the point to me. You were promised to be made a ...


21

I will avoid the discussion about "fair work practices", which I find problematic for the reasons explored in the comments. Instead, I will address two questions that I think are at the heart of your question. Does the fact that you work long hours contribute to a "culture of overwork"? Arguably, no. Investing a certain amount of time ...


21

You've been scooped, I'd say it's common. You could write: Further to publication of our preliminary results [1], X et al. showed ... Or: In parallel with this work, X et al. showed ... (You could cite your technical report elsewhere in the latter instance.) You can then explain how your work improves on theirs, especially as your results are way more ...


18

Astronat made a great comment: No one wants to be part of a system they dislike, but that's not a reason to opt out of the system. It's a reason to change the system. Since people tend to have different working styles and personal lives, how could one expect a one-sized-fits-all approach to work-life balance? You can improve the system by working to ...


15

Basically, you spent XYZ hours on this work depending on your colleagues promise that you would be co-author. This is time you would have spent on your own research otherwise. Pacta sunt servanda and you did your part. In addition, I agree with @JochenGlueck that if the paper already has 20 authors, there is no good reason why you shouldn't be also one of ...


15

I am assuming this is not experimental work. How to convince the referees that I got the results independently? Don't. How you got the results is irrelevant to the fact that they have already been published. It is my first time dealing with this issue. Shall I also submit the timestamps to prove that I had the result A? No. I am thinking about putting ...


14

Very strictly speaking, the following is rather a discussion of the circumstances than a plain answer to the question "What is the best thing I should do here?" Anyway, I think the following points should be pointed out in some detail. Should the OP be a co-author of the paper? Many (not all) people here seem to agree that, given the information ...


14

I can suggest two possibilities and a possible solution. First, your English writing seems awkward, so possibly you didn't express yourself well or made many misspellings. It is Fields Medal, by the way. This might have blown up your statement of purpose, which can be quite important. Second, it is possible that the "famous mathematicians" wrote ...


13

It is hard to to diagnose the problem from the information you provided. Like @Buffy, I notice that your written communication is quite rough -- to a degree this is understandable because you are presumably not a native English speaker, but it also looks sloppy. (A non-native speaker should also know how to spell "Fields Medal.") I will disagree ...


10

Ugh. I cannot believe professors do this, either as a good example or (worse) a poor example. You said that you're in the US, so it's completely legal unless it's easy to infer who the student was--for example, if there are a very small number of people in the class--in which case it's a FERPA violation. If you believe it's a FERPA violation, then go to the ...


9

Sorry, but you may not like this answer. Spending time and effort helping someone on a paper, even giving advice on presentation, doesn't make you an author. Had they used your statistical model, assuming that you created it and it is of publishable quality, then you would, of course, be an author. But if they decided not to use it, then you have no real ...


9

There is some effect, certainly, but it is probably a poor strategy to depend too much on it. If you look at what the American Mathematical Society, for example, has published in the past three or so years you will get a sense of where the current action is. It won't include my old specialty, hard classical analysis, as the number of open problems there as ...


9

It seems that one of your main concern is that you keep thinking about your research outside typical "business hours". Just to give you a different perspective: not all jobs outside academia are the type of 9am-5pm, where you finish the work at specific time and immediately cut off mentally from it. Consider a few examples: entrepreneurs - most (...


9

I think that indeed one should not dismiss, as it has been in some answers, the fact that the overwork culture is perpetuated as much by the increasing pressures in academics as by the people actually overworking. It is important to keep this in mind not to misunderstand some fundamental equilibriums. For example, some user spoke about "scarce research ...


9

To add a little further context to Buffy's and Pete Clark's: in the U.S. in the current state of things, as I see in my own math R1 state univ (I'm on grad admissions), the total number of (EDIT: not admissions) applicants is perhaps 30% greater than usual. At the same time, economic constraints (partly due to uncertainty about the course of the pandemic) ...


8

Those that dedicate themselves to their career will do better than those that don't. This is beyond your control: You cannot meaningfully influence the masses dedicating themselves to their careers,* nor the masses that don't. You're just one person, I don't think: [your] willingness to research in this way helps to reinforce a lot troublesome aspects of ...


8

Professional boxers, even though they are in a physically very demanding and rough line of work, take great pains to care for their fists. Folklore says that traditional kettlebell athletes (who are generally the stereotypical 'tough' guys) have elaborate palm moisturizing routines. Its because they realize that hands are necessary for their sustenance. For ...


8

I don't see a "culture of overwork" unique to academia. Ask a small business owner, a salesperson, professionals in industry, and so forth. What you'll find is that, like academia, there's a natural selection process always in the works, selecting those who are successful. And in that competition there are always those who are willing to work ...


7

I think you'd disserve yourself by making such a "complaint". Colleges have limited resources, and especially these days tend to be squeezed by administration... to offer ever-fewer courses, as ridiculous as that sounds. (Our graduate program at an R1 in the U.S. currently is under even-more-extreme pressure in this direction, for financial reasons ...


7

I am a retired lecturer, so here is my perspective. As an undergrad, you were part of a sausage machine, taking kids from school and running them through a training process where the competent ones could earn a Degree that said they were competent to ply a given "trade". Grad School is different. In many Unis it is a lead in to research, or if it's ...


6

Not a direct answer since I can’t presume to know what someone else would do, but you have several misconceptions about how university departments think and act, and maybe understanding them would help guide your thinking. Departments are quite used to spending money on “nothing” — your derogatory but totally inaccurate term for students who leave without ...


6

The US News ranking algorithm is proprietary. They don't say what it is. A few years ago some Reed College students attempted to reverse engineer the undergraduate program rankings. See https://www.reed.edu/reed-magazine/articles/2019/usnews-discrepancy.html https://www.insidehighered.com/admissions/article/2019/07/29/reed-students-challenge-us-news-formula


6

On the whole, this pedagogical technique is fair game If this is a groundbreaking research paper in the process of peer review, this could be a breach of confidentiality. One could argue that it is a breach of the author's copyright, but it is possible that the author has waived it by submitting the paper, and even if that were not the case, the professor ...


6

Good answers here already, but I feel some points are still missing: How you will behave depends on your research area, but I've never seen someone trying to revert a scoop situation and succeeding. Try to establish that your work came first is irrelevant in my opinion. You had the result and didn't publish it, and frankly, it doesn't make a lot of sense ...


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