63

This sounds pretty extreme, even for the "sink or swim" school of education. If you can meet the extreme standard without going crazy you will probably turn out ok, if a bit of a workaholic. But the road will be hard and painful. But, given your sense of it, you should probably move quickly to the exits. Not everyone is like that. Some of us ...


18

Let's go through the points: Perfection: To some degree, I agree with that. Training to avoid mistakes in the first place, to provide clean work at every milestone is a good habit, as long as it does not interfere with getting the work done at all. It can, of course, and like in this case, be exaggerated, but sometimes one finds that the more disciplined ...


9

I would switch advisors, if I were you. I can understand him only answering questions for papers that you should be reading; this keeps your thesis focused. Learning to program can be good for you to start. The no-collaboration rule seems a bit extreme. Please take care of your mental health. Find time to socialize with your classmates, have a hobby, and ...


6

I can identify with your advisor. On the other hand, his statement "collaboration is for undergraduates who struggle" makes me wonder if he may not be especially articulate in justifying his methods or empathetic in implementing them. This answer is similar to that by Captain Emacs. It is largely subjective, based on my time in the US Navy (on a ...


6

Your diversity statement is not about who you are. It is about why you should be admitted to the degree program. In particular, it is about your ability to work with other people in the degree program and your later career, and how this ability will advance the goals of the degree program. If your experiences relating to your caste has prepared you to work ...


5

It seems that "academic infraction" would be discipline for poor grades. That is wrong. Misconduct is a type of infraction. You were disciplined for an infraction. Disclose it.


5

Can't give you a generic answer, but here is my particular situation: I am an assistant professor in the Netherlands. Contacting me to pursue a PhD is futile, since I have no funding at the moment to host PhDs. If such funding would become available (which can happen at any time; there is no rhythm to this), positions will appear on my university's ...


4

It’s best to behave honestly and ethically. It seems clear to me that you’ve been acting in good faith so far and cannot be faulted for the oversight of not noticing this one guideline among the many confusing hoops the grad schools tell you to jump through. And the transgression, such that it is, seems very minor to me — after all your boss took an active ...


4

This sounds very much like the famous Moore method. "That student is taught the best who is told the least." Moore, quote in Parker (2005: vii). Further: The way the course is conducted varies from instructor to instructor, but the content of the course is usually presented in whole or in part by the students themselves. Instead of using a ...


3

Your advisor seems to be the academic analogue of Marissa Mayer: Managing a giant tech company is a lifestyle that leaves little time for sleep. Luckily, Mayer appears to be able to do without much. On multiple occasions, she's flaunted her habit of getting less than four hours a night and famously said that during her first five years at Google, she pulled ...


2

If your main motivation is to become a well-paid and respected professor, then I would say that you're better off playing the lottery. If you think getting a PhD will mean that you'll have better career prospects, then there's some merit in that, depending on the field you're in. There's also a difference between research groups and universities. If you're ...


2

I would recommend including it. Please note that I haven't ever been involved in evaluating diversity statements, so take this with a grain of salt. This is just my impression based on my overall understanding of diversity statements and the factors in play with them. While there might be a risk of a high-caste Indian professor seeing a discussion of being ...


2

Recently (2020 Oct 27) I have confirmed my education by the US standards: 100.50 semester hours of undergraduate credit A typical diploma in the US is 120 semester hours. So, you're a bit short. Be aware, however, that each school will make its own determination as to which classes can be transferred. Typically, they will look at the syllabus and determine ...


2

No real US university will award a degree to a student who has not taken any courses at that university. What you want is not possible. To award a degree, you must earn credits from the university. Typically, this is at least half the total credits required for the degree.


2

He sent me an email to discuss, and then during the online meeting, he asks me to do an oral exam. You present this as a bad thing, but it's actually a good thing. Apparently you did all the tests unusually fast, and in a way that looks to an observer like you're cheating. But that's not enough proof. It's possible that you're just pretty good at this ...


2

Yes, you can try those things. It is unlikely to make your situation worse. Only A and B know if they are willing to help you.


2

tl;dr– They probably just want some idea of who you are so they know what they're working with. Probably a good idea to give them something, though not necessarily a standard CV. Before contacting this potential supervisor, didn't you check out their group's homepage? Browse through some of their papers, check out some of their projects, and just ...


2

Rather than try to parse the words and not disclose, I would actually directly address the whole episode in the letter or statement included in the application. Write openly what happened, why it happened, and how you think about it now. I believe that such openness—especially if it shows that you learned from your past—would turn a possible negative into a ...


2

I received a grade sanction and disciplinary probation. Receiving an adverse penalty or outcome for your conduct means that you have been "disciplined" for that conduct, so this falls within the scope of those questions. Attempting to split hairs using a distinction between "academic performance" versus misconduct seems willfuly evasive ...


1

It's certainly possible, at least in the universities I'm acquainted with, to apply to a Ph.D. program in a field different from your masters degree. But to be accepted into such a program, you'll have to convince an admissions committee (or the professor with whom you want to work) that you have the necessary background. You mentioned that you have relevant ...


1

Who should I talk to? You should start applying to PhD programs. You probably missed the deadline for many programs if you’re thinking of starting in the fall though. How should I approach a potential professor whose research group I am interested in joining? A short email letting them know your situation and your interests should be sufficient. Be ...


1

While the accepted answer to the question is almost universally true, Excelsior College is a non-profit, regionally-accredited institution whose primary mission is to help students complete their degrees. They don't offer a degree in mathematics, but may allow you to obtain a degree that would permit you to enter a U.S. graduate program. If you are able to ...


1

Ask what he means by "CV". In some places, a CV (curriculum vitae) is simply another word for a standard resume, containing things like your previous employment history, the broad strokes of your education, and similar things; I believe that this usage is primarily found in the British English dialect. In other places, in academia, a CV ...


1

If IELTS scores are required, I recommend you to send them anyway. But from your question I understood that it isn't obligatory, so I suggest you rather not to send them or to take an exam one more time because it can be a sign of weakness in your application.


1

To grow your research trajectory, you need to prune your least-favorite projects. In research, you're never, ever going to be able to finish everything (no matter how many holidays you work). You need to figure out how to cut out some of your projects, so that the best ones have enough time, energy, and resources to grow. In practice, this means re-framing ...


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