270

I don't really think this is odd: they have been asked to send the assignment by email and they did. There isn't really a need to say anything further and they didn't. Maybe it would be slightly more courteous if they were to add a couple of words of greeting, but your job is not to be Emily Post. If the assignments were submitted on paper, and they left ...


161

As an instructor, when I find myself in this situation, I invite the student to make an appointment to speak with me privately in my office. During that private meeting, I will discuss his/her current performance in the class, and point out the likely consequences if he/she does not submit the required work. I will advise the student as to what he/she must ...


147

Adhere to the guidelines and syllabus you posted. If students can get around consequences of late submission by arguing, you have set a precedent, and they (and future generations of students) will argue again the next time. Don't go there. Consciously cultivate a reputation that pointless arguments don't work with you. Next time, make it clear that "normal"...


126

In general, yes, a teacher should know how to do any assignment and, in some cases, should have actually done it. In teaching programming, for example, it is usually a mistake to assign a problem that the instructor hasn't essentially done themselves. The reason is that one of the tasks in making assignments is to estimate the effort and time required to do ...


118

Very simple actually. Abandon the assignment. Apologize for the error, but not for wasting people's time. Those who didn't find the solution and worked on it certainly learned something. Those who found the solution used their time otherwise and hopefully learned something else. Mistakes happen. If you use a large number of exercises in grading it is ...


113

If the online sheet is incorrect and you suffered because of it, and if you have proof that the TA used that sheet, then you should point out to the professor of the course what has happened. But, ask for a a comparison between your answers and those that the TA suggests. This will make it clear. The other students may suffer or not, but that is up to ...


103

Answering from the point of view of a physical scientist, and in keeping with my personal take on what kinds of help are appropriate or inappropriate. (I haven't been a TA for a long time, but I teach at an all-undergrad department so I have to be my own TA.) These are great teachable moments if you have the time (and it can take a lot of time). You don't ...


97

I know this goes against what you have asked, but I do not think you should have a special policy for students who claim that their digital work is lost/damaged/destroyed. Here are two reasons: This is not really any different from when students complained that "the dog ate my homework." Both paper and digital formats are susceptible to being damaged, ...


95

I have to side with your professor here. You did not have a private phone conversation. You had a simulated conversation with a person you knew to be a fake client with the purpose of evaluating your skill. If the professor listens in to the conversation that means he will evaluate you himself instead of relying on the person he got to play the potential ...


93

Should I just tell him to talk to the instructor, and that my job is just marking? Yes. There's no point in getting into an extended argument with this student. The student thought his answers were correct and you explained why they were not correct. Since you've denied the student's appeal of the grade, the next appropriate step is generally for the ...


92

No, this bears no resemblance whatsoever to the concept of plagiarism. The goal of homework is to get you to review what you learned in class and demonstrate that you can apply it. That is exactly what you are doing. Moreover, the purists who will wag their fingers at you and tell you to “cite” the earlier proof are part of why we have a generation of ...


90

The main dilemma is that the homework is part of the grades, therefore you should prepare a new one each semester. I solved this for my programming course in a radical way (after struggling with a similar issue for a few years): I made all homework optional, and only the exams count. I make it very clear that the students will fail if they don't do the ...


86

When teaching large classes or multiple classes, it can be very helpful if the email, or even better the subject line, contains the key information about the class, section, group and assignment (and possibly TA). It should be the responsibility of the instructor to tell the students what is expected, if anything, in the syllabus and on the assignment itself....


86

I strongly recommend you start with whatever the policy is in your syllabus. Most syllabi contain details about grading, points allocation, etc. By starting here, you can avoid any claims of "unique treatment", given that everyone received the same instructions. That said, it sounds as though your student has a unique personal situation causing him to have ...


85

Leave the solution visible. Comment on it to everyone (so it is fair). Still require everyone to turn in a solution, but cannot be verbatim copy (but they can copy the algorithm/ideas/etc). Then, announce and include that same tool/problem solving technique in the final exam. Those who work the hardest on understanding (not just copying) will be rewarded ...


82

I think I'm going to be fundamentally disagreeing with a lot of the answers here. Nice numbers definitely make problems easier, and I make a habit of using them when first introducing a concept; they make the students more comfortable, and let them focus on the key idea that I'm trying to teach. But I never rely on nice numbers for tests or assignments. ...


66

No. The professor gets to decide if it would be more beneficial for students' learning to provide full solutions, partial solutions, or no solutions to homework problems.


64

First of all, I think the distribution that you're seeing is not very unusual, and indeed looks very similar to the distribution of times that I see coming from mature scientists submitting conference papers and grants. It is simply that people, including your students, tend to overcommit themselves and to underestimate the difficulty of work. When that is ...


57

I realize that the following advice may be very unsatisfying. But you may need to hear it, just to save yourself from grief. I hope it helps. It may be that you have done all that you can do without harming your own future. You need to judge that, of course, but getting between a new professor and the administration can be uncomfortable at best and career ...


56

You missed scenario f, which I suspect is the most common: The professor has been teaching this class and refining the textbook/notes for years, and developed homework questions out of problems that have come up over the course of that extended period of time of engaging with this material.


54

That is why I have a rule that for each homework a group of students is selected "at random", and asked by the TA to explain what they turned in. The grade of the interrogation replaces the homework grade. Rationale is that I really don't care (too much) if they copied from the Internet, got it in an obscure book somewhere, or worked it out in a group. I ...


50

It seems to me that there are two orthogonal aspects to this: Copyright Attribution Either of these would in my eyes justify talking to the student and/or to the websites he posted at. Re 1, you will need to decide by yourself whether you want to stick with a narrow interpretation of your copyright. If you don't explicitly allow dissemination, then the ...


50

Plagiarism is not a matter of quotation marks. The question is whether, when reading your homework, it is clear that the excerpts are not your own words but from some place else. You could also use an indentation for a paragraph, or put it all in italics. Quite often this is a matter of style guides or the preferences of the respective department or whoever ...


50

I have used a similar technique, albeit in a course for nonmajors and at a time late in my career when I was willing to acknowledge that my grading was often pretty impressionistic even when I had a rubric. To maximize what students learned from homework and to minimize the time I had to spend parsing their answers, I would go over the homework in class ...


50

The past is the past and cannot be undone. Whether you are ashamed or not, you need to move on. But you don't need to invite external punishment for past misdeeds that haven't harmed others. It is best if you do your own work, of course, since that maximizes your learning. It is worst if you copy since you haven't really learned anything. In between is ...


45

While I admire your concern for the students, I feel that ultimately your endeavor is quixotic. To be sure, I see nothing wrong with making your deadline be at 10 pm. It won't change anything, so you might as well. But I wouldn't expect it to have any notable effect, and I would be wary of the slippery slope that leads to you blaming yourself for the ...


45

Can my professor require, at the penalty of point loss, that I actually contact my family members? No, because for all the professor knows, you might be an orphan without any living family members. However, I suspect the request is meant in less literal a way than what you are taking it for. You should clarify this with your professor. The issue is that ...


43

It is useful to have a pool of questions to avoid having the same questions every year. If you have questions for like 2,5 years, you are able to mix them in every year and it is hard to use the previous years notes of somebody else to copy the answers. If you do not have enough questions yet, you can try changing some numbers and variable names at least, ...


41

Most instructors will refuse to check your homework for you before you turn it in. You get it graded once and only once. There are no do-overs where you get to turn it in the first time, they point out your mistakes, then you get to turn it in again after you've corrected it. If you're confused, you can ask clarifying questions about what the homework ...


40

Others have given good answers here. A further possibility is to talk to a more senior colleague who seems sensible, and ask them why is this OK? Their answer might be ‘what?! this is not OK!’, at which point it becomes their problem; or it might be ‘ah, sit down, Padawan,...' and you are initiated into some academic practicalities (you may or may not be ...


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