70

I'd like to offer a counterpoint to Anonymous Physicist. I started school early because I was on the border of the birthday cutoff date, and then skipped my senior year of high school. So I left for college at 15. It was too early for me. Not academically. I passed all of my classes, and found a number of them still a bit boring. But going to college isn't ...


64

Note: this answer was migrated from physics.SE, so I've had to re-render the formulas as images. The answer is also specific to learning physics, though it might work for other fields too. This looks like a classic XY problem. I don't know of any practicing physicists that use a special memorization scheme 'without understanding', and I think such a thing ...


62

In higher education, if there is information to be memorized, students are generally expected to do that themselves, in their own time and their own way. This is unlike primary education, for example, where teachers may use class time to help students memorize things. So spaced repetition "is not formally applied to higher education" because generally, in ...


61

I teach at a university in Asia and I could say the exact same thing about our European/American exchange students. Quite simply, exchange students have very different incentives from regular students. They often convert their grades to a simple pass/fail on their transcripts so they just need to pass the class (we get students from very reputable ...


60

Wait! Perhaps you can finish tenth grade AND attend the internship, using some people skills :) First, there should be an administrative coordinator listed in your internship correspondence. (If not, ask the offering professor for a contact name). Call this person and say that you are honored to receive an offer, and that your school calendar year runs ...


50

I don't see a reasonable answer beyond "it depends." It depends on the question: some surprise questions are not actually so difficult and could reasonably be asked on a test with no special preparation, while others are very difficult indeed. It also depends on the students: you can demand more of experienced and talented students than you can of typical ...


41

Every question on a test should be about the material in the course. Many times, however, the professor may be trying to teach a deeper concept than some of the students have learned. This is what creates a "surprise" question: the professor asks something that requires mastery of the material or insight into its deeper meaning, and the student has only ...


37

What do you mean, "introduced"? Someone has to pay for the teaching in any case. Students paying for their education has been the default option since at least Bologna in 1088, when the studies happened because enough people wanted to pay for such an education. It has continued to be the case throughout history, except for some prestigious universities that ...


34

One of the solutions for limiting / demarcating the time you spend on MA students is to set aside specific office hours for that purpose. For example, you could dedicate Fridays 1p - 5p for the purpose of answering MA questions on theses. If they have questions or if they want to show you revisions of their thesis, then they need to sign up and come to your ...


33

This is probably as variable as the educational system generally. But I'd doubt that more than a few professors get special allowances for such things. Some of the books you see are text books given to professors by publishers in hope that the professor will adopt them for a class. Some of them are "ancient" texts that the professor used as a student back ...


31

I do think your first point is a little strange as in my experience (American university, CS), the Asian students always attended and were often the ones that stayed after during the additional review time. I have much more experience with Chinese students so I will tailor my answer to them. Avoiding doing work/learning - This can be attributed to many ...


30

In tertiary education, it is the responsibility of the students to pick appropriate learning methods. It is simply not the task of a university to incorporate spaced repetition or any other learning technique, because revising and repetition is something that students have to do on their own. Bluntly put, if students "exhibit [an] illusion", that's something ...


30

Just a guess, but the guess is that you are uniformly underestimating your own skills and the quality of your education. You say "When an author derives something, I sometimes need a few minutes to make sure that the math is sound." Well, it might take me hours or days. You are undecided about field and find a lot of interesting things that you might study....


28

This depends a great deal on the professor and course in question. Better to ask first if you plan to do this. Also, check the syllabus if there is a stated policy regarding help on homework.


24

We should start with the Wikipedia definition: A diploma mill (also known as a degree mill) is an unaccredited higher education institution that offers bogus academic degrees and diplomas for a fee. These degrees may claim to give credit for relevant life experience, but should not be confused with legitimate prior learning assessment programs. If a ...


24

I guess it depends on what you call a "surprise question". Usually, when you design tests, you don't want all questions to be the same difficulty. Rather, you would want to have a number of basic questions to find out who actually did not "get" the fundamental messages (and should hence fail), some intermediary questions which the majority of students will ...


22

"I don't think not being in traditional high school will be a hindrance to my college admissions" As a high school dropout who is now an academic, I have found skipping much of my secondary education has actually accelerated my education, career, and earnings. However, this path is not for everyone. It depends on what sort of high school is involved, the ...


19

I agree with some of the other people answering this question that there isn't a single, definitive reason for this approach, but here are some factors that play a role. Note that I'm not defending or endorsing these factors, just describing them. People in the U.S. are very attached to private universities, in a way that is not true in many countries, and ...


19

Talk to the person in your department who is responsible for overseeing the undergraduate education program (the title is usually a variant on "undergraduate advisor" or "director of undergraduate studies"). Such individuals usually have the authority to waive and approve courses that are not part of the "official" study plan when exceptional circumstances ...


17

I record my lectures (when possible) for the following reasons: Easier access for students who can't attend class. While I generally want students to come to class, there are valid reasons for being absent (e.g., I'm currently teaching classes to military members who often have duty that preempts class attendance). I can also point students to a video to ...


17

I disagree with much of your premise. It is the students responsibility not to cheat It is the responsibility of the professor to detect cheating when possible It is the responsibility of the institution to levy consequences for cheating All of this is done to uphold the quality of the degree sought and the reputation of the institution. Finally, ...


16

In my view, a fair examination question draws on any or all of the following: Material discussed or presented during class contact time. Material from any of the items on the course reading list. Core material from any prerequisite courses. Material that might properly be regarded as common knowledge for students at this stage in their education (basic ...


16

As a grad student in computer engineering, I have a similar problem when I switch between projects that use different programming languages. I might spend months working in a high-level language like Python, only to switch to a project using a low-level language like C, or a project whose language I'm unfamiliar with, like MATLAB. As I see it, there are ...


15

One may prove their knowledge by these aspects. They may have a certificate of the courses they have passed. They may have a publication or patent registration in the field of their personal studies. They may have worked in the field of their knowledge and their projects and portfolio is a proof of their knowledge. A website designer may not have any ...


15

After doing some research on the Web, it seems to be the case that my interests fall into the field of theoretical computer science and discrete mathematics. Yes, I agree. Moreover these fields have substantial overlap, and your interests lie safely in this intersecting region. You could plausibly attend either program, and the post-PHD opportunities and ...


15

I hate to answer by stereotyping, so I'll do my best to avoid it. That said, there are differences between people in different parts of the world. Some are easy to see and anticipate, once you know to look for them, and others are much harder. Some people, for example, have cultural mores about open criticism. They may take great offense as being called ...


14

TL;DR We did something along this lines for Java-based programming assignments. Students and TAs generally like it. It was a lot of work for us. (Very) Long Version I used to teach software engineering at a large public university in Austria. We implemented a similar approach for two courses back there, for a 400+ students bachelor-level distributed ...


14

I'm going to be a bit more harsh than the current answers, and ask whether you knew what you were getting yourself into when you signed up for a multidisciplinary graduate program. What you describe is very common in such programs; you enter with significant knowledge in one field (e.g., comp sci), almost no knowledge in another (e.g., biology), and your ...


13

One of the key things about U.S. system of higher education is that it is, for the most part, not regulated by statute. For all of the "rules" that you explained, there are institutions that do not follow them (except the freedom to depart, which is guaranteed not by regulation, but by the lack of regulation, which creates a free market). In theory, ...


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