70

I'd like to offer a counterpoint to Anonymous Physicist. I started school early because I was on the border of the birthday cutoff date, and then skipped my senior year of high school. So I left for college at 15. It was too early for me. Not academically. I passed all of my classes, and found a number of them still a bit boring. But going to college isn't ...


64

Note: this answer was migrated from physics.SE, so I've had to re-render the formulas as images. The answer is also specific to learning physics, though it might work for other fields too. This looks like a classic XY problem. I don't know of any practicing physicists that use a special memorization scheme 'without understanding', and I think such a thing ...


62

In higher education, if there is information to be memorized, students are generally expected to do that themselves, in their own time and their own way. This is unlike primary education, for example, where teachers may use class time to help students memorize things. So spaced repetition "is not formally applied to higher education" because generally, in ...


61

I teach at a university in Asia and I could say the exact same thing about our European/American exchange students. Quite simply, exchange students have very different incentives from regular students. They often convert their grades to a simple pass/fail on their transcripts so they just need to pass the class (we get students from very reputable ...


60

Wait! Perhaps you can finish tenth grade AND attend the internship, using some people skills :) First, there should be an administrative coordinator listed in your internship correspondence. (If not, ask the offering professor for a contact name). Call this person and say that you are honored to receive an offer, and that your school calendar year runs ...


52

I know from all too personal experience that it the easiest thing in the world to say "I could totally ace these assignments if I tried, but I can't be bothered to try." Talk is cheap. You may be different, but when I said stuff like that I was completely deluding myself. You may be being too hard on your profs and TAs. CS departments generally don't cover ...


50

I don't see a reasonable answer beyond "it depends." It depends on the question: some surprise questions are not actually so difficult and could reasonably be asked on a test with no special preparation, while others are very difficult indeed. It also depends on the students: you can demand more of experienced and talented students than you can of typical ...


41

Every question on a test should be about the material in the course. Many times, however, the professor may be trying to teach a deeper concept than some of the students have learned. This is what creates a "surprise" question: the professor asks something that requires mastery of the material or insight into its deeper meaning, and the student has only ...


37

What do you mean, "introduced"? Someone has to pay for the teaching in any case. Students paying for their education has been the default option since at least Bologna in 1088, when the studies happened because enough people wanted to pay for such an education. It has continued to be the case throughout history, except for some prestigious universities that ...


34

One of the solutions for limiting / demarcating the time you spend on MA students is to set aside specific office hours for that purpose. For example, you could dedicate Fridays 1p - 5p for the purpose of answering MA questions on theses. If they have questions or if they want to show you revisions of their thesis, then they need to sign up and come to your ...


33

I am most of the way through my freshman year.... Going away to school has been rough, and I have been pretty depressed for most of the time there. This strikes me as the most important part of your question. I strongly encourage you to find help with your depression before you make a decision. Talk with your faculty mentors, with friends, and with family....


31

I do think your first point is a little strange as in my experience (American university, CS), the Asian students always attended and were often the ones that stayed after during the additional review time. I have much more experience with Chinese students so I will tailor my answer to them. Avoiding doing work/learning - This can be attributed to many ...


30

In tertiary education, it is the responsibility of the students to pick appropriate learning methods. It is simply not the task of a university to incorporate spaced repetition or any other learning technique, because revising and repetition is something that students have to do on their own. Bluntly put, if students "exhibit [an] illusion", that's something ...


29

I worked as a software engineer for a number of years before I decided to pursue a full-time BS in CS. Getting a degree is one of the best decisions I ever made. Given that it sounds like you already have a fair grasp on the principles of programming, it's not surprising that you haven't learned much in your first year. But that will quickly change! More ...


28

This depends a great deal on the professor and course in question. Better to ask first if you plan to do this. Also, check the syllabus if there is a stated policy regarding help on homework.


24

We should start with the Wikipedia definition: A diploma mill (also known as a degree mill) is an unaccredited higher education institution that offers bogus academic degrees and diplomas for a fee. These degrees may claim to give credit for relevant life experience, but should not be confused with legitimate prior learning assessment programs. If a ...


24

I guess it depends on what you call a "surprise question". Usually, when you design tests, you don't want all questions to be the same difficulty. Rather, you would want to have a number of basic questions to find out who actually did not "get" the fundamental messages (and should hence fail), some intermediary questions which the majority of students will ...


22

"I don't think not being in traditional high school will be a hindrance to my college admissions" As a high school dropout who is now an academic, I have found skipping much of my secondary education has actually accelerated my education, career, and earnings. However, this path is not for everyone. It depends on what sort of high school is involved, the ...


20

(From my iPhone, please excuse typos) It appears from my position that getting a BS is becoming more important as time goes on. Many large/midsized companies won't even look at candidates without a degree. (I have been around over 30 years working in startups to multinationals.) It could be that you aren't mature enough yet for college. Maturity can ...


19

I agree with some of the other people answering this question that there isn't a single, definitive reason for this approach, but here are some factors that play a role. Note that I'm not defending or endorsing these factors, just describing them. People in the U.S. are very attached to private universities, in a way that is not true in many countries, and ...


19

Talk to the person in your department who is responsible for overseeing the undergraduate education program (the title is usually a variant on "undergraduate advisor" or "director of undergraduate studies"). Such individuals usually have the authority to waive and approve courses that are not part of the "official" study plan when exceptional circumstances ...


18

Allowed - yes. Have any reasonable chance to compete - no. (But to learn university-level things, given the determination - yes.) There are two separate issues: you won't learn stuff abut the current research lines and you won't be able to attract others to your results, in academia things like degrees and university/advisor name do matter. First, you ...


17

I record my lectures (when possible) for the following reasons: Easier access for students who can't attend class. While I generally want students to come to class, there are valid reasons for being absent (e.g., I'm currently teaching classes to military members who often have duty that preempts class attendance). I can also point students to a video to ...


17

I disagree with much of your premise. It is the students responsibility not to cheat It is the responsibility of the professor to detect cheating when possible It is the responsibility of the institution to levy consequences for cheating All of this is done to uphold the quality of the degree sought and the reputation of the institution. Finally, ...


16

In my view, a fair examination question draws on any or all of the following: Material discussed or presented during class contact time. Material from any of the items on the course reading list. Core material from any prerequisite courses. Material that might properly be regarded as common knowledge for students at this stage in their education (basic ...


16

As a grad student in computer engineering, I have a similar problem when I switch between projects that use different programming languages. I might spend months working in a high-level language like Python, only to switch to a project using a low-level language like C, or a project whose language I'm unfamiliar with, like MATLAB. As I see it, there are ...


15

Should I stay in school? No You're a big boy now and can make your own decisions. As condescending as that sounds, it's the simple truth. If you get a job and find a place to live, you will be just like the majority of people in the world who don't have a college degree, but are self sufficient. American high schools tend to bully students into applying ...


15

One of my former PhD students works in the CISE department at UF, so my opinion is not exactly objective. But here it is: Will the quality of education in the CISE department be the same after this restructuring? Absolutely not. Teaching computer science well requires serious manpower. Unless CS courses are limited to a very small number of students, ...


15

One may prove their knowledge by these aspects. They may have a certificate of the courses they have passed. They may have a publication or patent registration in the field of their personal studies. They may have worked in the field of their knowledge and their projects and portfolio is a proof of their knowledge. A website designer may not have any ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible