Hot answers tagged

45

You don't. That email is a clear rejection, and any attempt at a follow-up will only waste everyone's time. If the professor were open to get to know you and to be convinced that you are a top-level candidate, they would have indicated so. Instead, they are pointing out that they already have two PhD students (and, tacitly, are thus not overly keen on ...


41

While it might have a negative impact on your supervisor, it also might not have a negative impact if you handle it properly! And it will definitively have a negative impact on your career if you do not make this switch. Handling it properly in this sense means soon and professionally. Schedule a meeting to talk to him about your expectations not being met ...


38

It's not a good idea to talk about ranking with a potential supervisor, because it can easily offend (example). This is for a few reasons: Some professors genuinely hate rankings. The ranking is not something the supervisor can directly control. The entire university is ranked, and they are but one professor in the university. You are implicitly using the ...


16

The ranking of the university should be quite irrelevant to you as an individual: what matters is what you do. In other words, there is good (and very good) research done everywhere, and there is bad research done everywhere also. The rankings are affected by all kinds of “meta” factors that have no connection with the quality of research of this faculty ...


15

They've already told you you can apply, so of course you can apply. If they were going to reject you they'd presumably tell you not to apply to both save your time and theirs. On the other hand, you'll need to compete against this year's prospective PhD students. Maybe a particularly outstanding student applied this year. There's no guarantee you'll be ...


14

It doesn't suprise me that you are at loggerheads on this, because I see benefits/drawbacks in each position. This is also wrapped up in the revisions that the candidate will make to their thesis in response to referee feedback, so some complicated timing issues arise. As a general observation, allowing the candidate to have access to their referee reports ...


13

Well, you are all capable adults, aren't you? Feeling guilty is normal under your circumstances, and you might offer your supervisor some extra help to smoothen things out, but at the end of the day, you have already made your decision and are not staying, and it is in their capacity to handle the lab. The sooner you two start working something out, the ...


14

I agree with Arno that this is a clear rejection. I work at a university in Germany, but I suppose the situation in France is similar. The problem is that professors get such e-mails all the time, usually from students who live in an Asian or Arab country. They send CVs, grades, even theses. Now imagine a professor who gets an e-mail like yours every few ...


12

ask him about the possibility of having admission to a better ranking university Do not. It is unlikely that your potential supervisor can do anything about admission to another university.


12

My question is, are there any universities that already have a policy like this in place and if so, is it beneficial for the PhD candidates? Yes, my university has a policy like that: the candidates receive an assessment of their dissertation and a grade from the reviewers (two), and then have some time to amend it according to the reviewer's remarks. At ...


10

is it beneficial for the PhD candidates? I don't think anyone really "fails" the defense This is not specific to your university, but: Nearly always failing PhD students never attempt a defense. They are gone one or two years into their PhDs. The defense has largely a ceremonial function, so changing around the rules for defenses is not going ...


7

It is definitively a thing at my University in the Czech Republic. PhD candidates get the assessment about two weeks ahead of the defence, so that they can prepare for whatever questions came up in the assessment. The defence then works the following: The student gives a presentation about their main thesis results. The examiners give a short summary of ...


7

One thing you can surely do is take a math course improve your skills, so that you can then be accepted into the Statistics course. Unfortunately, as the saying goes, there is no royal road.


6

Don't frame it as a "reminder" at all For any unsolicited emails where the recipient has reasonable grounds to ignore the email, it is not a good idea to send a "reminder" (and especially not a "very polite reminder" --- yuck!). As Bryan Krause points out in his answer, a reminder could be taken to imply that the original email ...


5

I received the reviewer's documents before my defense in France (I do not remember how much time it was, probably two or three weeks before the defense). I do not really understand what the intent of keeping that confidential would be. To surprise the candidate? This would be childish. The defense is a ceremony for the candidate. It should be fun and leave ...


5

Given your background and the info you provided in your comment, this means that you are likely spending more time on this than your peers. This doesn't mean you are 'less capable', as you put it, but simply that you need to learn this aspect first before you will be able to make decent progress in your CS research. Your peers may already know this and will ...


4

I suggest that you don't send a thesis. It is too much, too soon. Instead, find a sponsor locally who knows you well enough to be a fair judge of your likelihood of success in a competitive program. Have that sponsor contact the professor, preferably personally, with a recommendation. Even a LoR can wait until the initial contact is made. Given the assumed ...


4

Yes, it's typical (at least in math, as paul garrett says in a comment) that such events are for accepted grad students. Based on your post, it sounds like this differs from their procedures in normal years. Here is a guess: since the open house is virtual, there is no cost in inviting more people than usual to the open house event. So the department ...


4

Some of the longest days of my work life were those before I actually left somewhere I had already mentally checked out of. And the least productive. And the grouchiest. Do everybody in that lab a favor: leave, and soon. Rip the band-aid off. Like long goodbyes, long transitions are highly overrated. Truth: you aren't anywhere near so unique that you can't ...


4

France Note: I did my PhD in France 2012 - 2016, but then continued my academic career in the UK. So some of this might be outdated, a narrow picture, or use incorrect terminology. Funding availability Advisors may advertise potential PhD topics on their institutional web pages before any funding has been secured. It indicates that they have considered the ...


4

Firstly, a huge congratulations on your acceptance. That's wonderful news. As a faculty member, I can say that I don't think you need to worry about being too enthusiastic. I would encourage you to say a bit more in your response and let them know that you are very excited. Also, don't worry too much about the content of this email, you're in! For the time ...


3

One of the most important/common challanges of management is to deal with staff turnover. It is a standard part of running any enterprise, and something that managers have to learn to deal with. If you feel that your present placement is not good for your career, and you would prefer this other offer, it is reasonable for you to act on that. This will be ...


3

You’re overthinking this. If an academic position description says that a PhD is required, then a PhD is, well, required. Your friend does not qualify, sorry.


3

England (and the UK) Note: I assume the process is somewhat similar through the UK, but I know there are some difference between the four constituent countries. I am mostly familiar with the situation in England. Note 2: I work in computer science / robotics so if anybody is aware of differences to other areas, please do edit them in. Funding Availability ...


2

I think at the stage of PhD defense, the candidate has a brief idea of the quality of the thesis. A well-written thesis is obvious for those in the field (both the candidate and the comittee). I don't think it can give any significant advantages just before the actual defense. Also, in many universities, only a "successful" thesis can be defended. ...


2

It is worth looking at How to survive a PhD viva: 17 top tips and you will realize there is maybe one tip where having a list of assessment beforehand will help -- for the rest it won't and actually it might hurt. Especially note this tip: There’s a danger of trying to over-prepare. Don’t learn answers off by heart – it removes the spontaneity and is ...


2

I wanna add a bit to Jeroens answer. With you having majored in Math and not CS you will of course not have as much insight into the practical work of a CS-major, so will need to (re)learn more than your peers. You can still succeed but it might not be as easy for you. I wanna go into a bit more detail regarding the list of examples you provided us with: I ...


2

I don't think you can talk about the ranking of the university to the potential supervisor. This can be very damaging to your relationship, and quite offending to the supervisor knowing that you look down on him/her or their institute. You should probably see if you have an alternative in a "better" university and decide based on the project, ...


2

The only relevant thing is your employment after PhD. If you get PhD from McGill or UToronto, you probably will have more chances. But a lot depends on the reputation ("ranking" if you wish) of your supervisor. The potential supervisor probably had other students who got their PhD. You should check where these students are now.


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