Hot answers tagged

96

It seems like you have to have a conversation with your adviser. There is certainly nothing wrong with your approach: You read through code on which you have knowledge and something to say; you then were proactive and wanted to fix the issue; all of these are commendable. If you happen to have been mistaken, well, that happens -- but then that's what patch ...


67

These days I see myself as useless and miserable person that just works more than 12 hours per day and the other 12 hours that I suppose to rest or sleep still I'm thinking about my research but I'm not happy, I don't have any friends, I'm depressed, I'm nervous, I'm stressful, etc. So, yeah I'm angry that people hates me if even I tell them the truth. It ...


36

I don't see any integrity issues. Your intentions seemed to be to correct an error. Unless your intention was to sabotage your competition, there is nothing wrong with this. Possibily, your mentor believes you should have checked with others first, but acting rashly is not academic dishonesty.


21

Are you sure your adviser understood what you did? The concept of GitHub, PRs etc. may be alien to him and he could have understood that you publicly stated that his formula is incorrect, in a non-peer reviewed thing (I am making that up, just to show that interpretations can escalate quickly). When you cool down, have a conversation with him clearly ...


11

There are a few things to consider and clarify: GitHub is not an authoritative academic reference. Journal papers are expected to be thoroughly reviewed and free from most usual mistakes. They have their process for correcting mistakes, which is different from GitHub, where a single person and not necessarily a committee decides what is best for the code. ...


10

I know that you want us to say "It will all be ok", but it may just be true that either (i) you have to take the GRE test again and get a better score, or (ii) change your approach to applying. The fact is that apparently things haven't worked out with your current approach, and so to keep trying isn't likely going to yield different results. So take the ...


5

They want you to be very specific and very quick, that's fine. That's good. Slide 1: Who are you? Your academic past, or some other relevant information (e.g. industry experience, if relevant to your future research). That should take about 1 minute. Slide 2: What are your research interests? Did you do a masters, and if so what is it about, what was the ...


5

The results of teamwork are not solely yours, and you have to be mindful how you share them. As Mefitico mentioned in their answer, you may not have the rights to use the code you offered to that project. It's important to note that "open source" or "on GitHub" doesn't mean "do whatever" (though there is a license for that too). For example, the popular MIT ...


4

There may be a few situations in which, from what you describe, your advisor considers an issue of academic integrity. It is not clear what the exact situation of 'your reference' is referring to though. These are pretty speculative until your question is more refined. 1) You are referring to work that is yet to be published or reviewed by your advisor ...


4

In the U.S., and to the extent I understand it, in Canada, funding is slightly and significantly separate from "being allowed to hang around, register for classes, etc.". Of course, in many STEM fields, the usual expectation is that one _is_funded_ including tuition paid, so long as one is "in good standing" in the grad program. That means passing exams on ...


3

I suggest you say very little in your application materials. Nothing more than "My completion was delayed by medical/(or whatever) considerations, now resolved." Just that. If you get into a situation in which you need to say more, it will likely be with a small group and you can go into detail as you see best. They will have some valid concern that the ...


3

2 slides in 4 minutes is not an excessively low number; I'd be worried more about four minutes than two slides. The restriction is probably to make people speak from their knowledge and use the slides as a visual aid, rather than reading from Powerpoint. You want people to be listening to you except when you point to a graphic - not ignoring you while they ...


3

I believe that academic tree does not impact your work. However it is something that is really cool and gives you a sense of responsibility that you are carrying some of the most significant names of the industry. Having these names associated to you will give you a sense of pride and honor and that is all what it is. In addition to that it may also be used ...


3

No, posting an issue on GitHub is not an academic integrity violation Based on the facts that you have laid out, there is nothing that remotely resembles an academic integrity violation. You say you have provided a reference to the "correct" formula. I understand you to mean that both the approximation and the exact methods are published and widely known. ...


2

Depending on field, there can be substantial downsides, because academic papers and PhD theses are fundamentally different beasts. There are certain things that people just don't publish in academic journals, but that is nevertheless useful information. Experimental or theoretical failures is the obvious one that everyone knows about - it's much harder to ...


2

In my opinion, this is nothing more than a sales pitch. The first part to getting this right is to know your clientele. They mostly care about two things: (1) doing something that gives them a sense of purpose and (2) doing something that will lead to whatever income they aspire to or close enough. So, as Simon Sinek would say, start with Why. Perhaps you ...


2

When you withdraw from the program, you can tell people later (in a job interview, social situation etc) that you “decided to withdraw from the program”. If you are fired you will have the option of either lying (with possible bad consequences if the lie is found out) or telling people “I was fired”. Which of those sounds better?


2

It's going to be a big old "that depends." In the case of a very similar undergrad subject to grad subject, as electrical engineering to electrical engineering, the engineering degree will be looked on favorably. Especially if the undergrad school was a high ranked school. The farther the subjects are apart the less weight the engineering degree will ...


1

In some places, doctoral students aren't actually employees though they have some other position, such as a TA, which can be a separate thing. Your relationship to the university is "student", not "employee". In such systems what you suggest makes perfect sense. You can no longer enroll in courses if you fail comps. Normally a TA job also disappears since ...


1

Be very brief and to say that the problems are fixed now. Nobody wants to hear you bare your soul, to get the details on how your grandpa died or broke your leg or whatever. You are a more mature person and more dedicated person now. You are trying to sell yourself here. So all you want to do is show that you covered the issue and then shift the topic to ...


1

It would be naive to think that the name of your degree is hugely determinative of your suitability for a doctoral admission. What matters is what you did within the degree and how suitable it is for the next level. An engineering degree might be highly suitable for a degree in applied math. Or not. What any admissions committee wants to know is how ...


1

You most probably got into a PhD program with a bad supervisor. This is not your fault. The first option is to talk with your supervisor and see if he thinks there is a chance that you can finish your PhD. Most of the time a PhD is more a social concept than a scientific one: science is hard - if people think that you did things to the best of your ability ...


1

I am sorry for what happened to you, even if I don't know wether wrong formula is actually wrong or not. A country/cultural tag could be interested there, since I think your last edit presents a very rude reaction from you supervisor. I would recommend something that is often said in company world, but is actually a matter of fact and should be thought ...


1

I suggest asking your old writers or others at the institution for new letters. Treat it as a chance to catch up with old professors which is a good thing to do for any prospective academic. The old letters have less relevance and new ones, while still dealing mostly with what you were like two years ago can give some assurance that you've been active in ...


1

For a specific position, their interest will be in making a determination about your "fit" for that position. I doubt that they would reasonably expect you to be already "custom made" (bespoke) for the position, but want an idea about how quickly you will come up to speed with their main project(s). Few people are productive immediately, but it is an ...


1

The UK has an official answer that might be of use. In particular, the general criteria are: • scientific rigour and excellence, with regard to design, method, execution and analysis • significant addition to knowledge and to the conceptual framework of the field • actual significance of the research • the scale, challenge and logistical difficulty ...


1

Although the question is answered, I would like to add something more. The fact that you are being blocked from the github may be more than just the former supervisors right, but also your access to ongoing development. They may be simply removing you from a repository that they plan to continue to work on and develop, in which case you should not have ...


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