5

I do think this is a poor piece of rhetoric. It shares shades of writing that includes a lot of "obviously", "of course", "trivial to see", etc. This tends to signal a place where the writer has a weak explanation and is trying to get over that hump by using a proof by intimidation. As an example, when I reviewed Sebastian Thrun'...


5

I agree with the other answers here that such statements are problematic because they can both demoralise students and also make it difficult for them to ask for clarification or a better description. However, I would also, in general, heavily advise against using questions such as Is that clear? Before I became a TEFL teacher (English language teacher for ...


3

I've often rated the topic at the start of class: "a lot of people think this next thing is hard. I'm going to go over the problem it solves, then hopefully the rules will make sense. There are only 2, but they're weird". In that context when I say something is easy I'm saying that compared to the class so far, it won't be as bad as you were ...


3

While @xLeitix's answer pretty much sums it up, I would like to add that "A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it." Students complain about marks if either a. Your rubrics/grading criteria are unclear or inconsistently applied b. The students perceive you as pliant. Of course, there are those students who will just complain for ...


2

It depends on the country and university regulations. At some universities in Canada where I was, students could see how they mid-term exams were graded, but they had to ask to see the final exam through a formal procedure (which they rarely did perhaps because the semester had ended and students had left). But students would often ask about their homework ...


1

It's not inherently unfair to stop students from seeing their exams, so long as the instructor still grades fairly and provides meaningful feedback. Students typically ask to see graded exams so that either (1) they can argue over points, or (2) they can get feedback on their performance. Students argue over points to protect themselves from biased and ...


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