37

It could be that your co-author attempted to reach out to you in order to get your permission to use your name but never got a response, i.e. old email/ not known address, ran out of time and had to publish without your name. I would advise getting in touch with your colleague first in order to establish what happened before using the nuclear option. It may ...


25

You're putting the cart before the horse here. Step 0 is to contact your previous supervisor and ask for clarifications. You may or may not get an answer, and if you get one it may very well disappoint you, but I'm willing to bet no journal editor or university administrator will want to proceed unless you first tried to resolve the issue with your old ...


16

Yes, you can complain to the editor. If you complain to IEEE, the publisher, they will probably refer you to the editor. You can request retraction or request a correction adding your name as an author. A correction would require the agreement of all authors. You can also complain to the university, but the university can only punish the supervisor. They ...


10

Wow, yes that is completely unethical. I recently stopped working at an academic institution, but I still collaborate with my former colleagues and we continue to publish old projects that I was involved in, with me being an author still. I think you have two options: Contacting the university you did you postdoc at. Email the head of faculty, or if ...


9

Publishing is a painful experience, and everybody gets rejected most of the time. That you got 3 rejections on the same paper is perfectly normal. The comments in the reviews can be brutal and sometimes they are wrong. That can be infuriating, especially if they are both. In short, publishing requires a very thick skin; learn what you can from the reviews. ...


2

Your supervisor's conduct is blatantly unethical. The current relationship is harming your career. You need to find a new job.


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