56

First, take time to read this question to understand what does the Corresponding Author mean for different publishers. The definitions vary, but in principle CA is the author who can be contacted about the paper results after the publication, including the long-term period (10+ years). Perhaps, you are the best person to act as a CA for this paper? Do ask ...


12

If your advisor hasn’t contributed anything to the paper intellectually then they can’t ethically put their name on a paper they didn’t contribute to. That has nothing to do with funding or RAships. That said, what I described above is the ideal. Students are often under pressure to do what advisors say. Authorship is best discussed directly and if you have ...


10

While it's impossible to judge contribution from outside, I generally recommend erring on the side of inclusion when it comes to authorship. If there's a reasonable argument that somebody contributed, it doesn't really cost you anything to have them on the paper. Furthermore, there are many ways to contribute to a paper (see, for example, the CRediT ...


8

It is not a problem for your career not to be the corresponding author on this paper, and there is no reason to problematise it. But you should be the first author on the author list, given what you've said about the distribution of work.


5

In some fields, alphabetical listing is strongly preferred. Doing it differently would be seen as odd. Because of my actual family name I'm often "first". But I also frequently publish with more prominent people and no one ever thinks that I dominate the research in any way. But the work in such fields tends to be highly collaborative (as I suspect it is ...


5

In my experience, the best way to ensure that you get appropriate credit for your work is to work with trustworthy people. Now, whether somebody is trustworthy is not always easy to determine (especially for a new graduate student), and there are also both genuine mistakes and genuine differences of opinion and criteria that often occur. Nevertheless, ...


5

You have exactly two reasonable options here: Withdraw the article, or offer to your group mate to add her name to the paper. (She may decline of course - that is her decision to make, not yours and not your adviser’s). I can’t say which of those two options are better for you, but in the absence of other information I would tend to assume that the adviser ...


4

In my field (neuroscience, would probably also apply elsewhere in biology and medicine), posters count far less than papers but are still a concrete way to demonstrate progress on a research project. Posters are often drafts of papers so reporting a poster suggests you will be an author on a future publication (with all the caveats of the work not being peer ...


4

This might depend on the field. In computer science, for example, conferences are more than just "get togethers" and serious research is often first presented there and might be published only in proceedings. In such a case it would be good for a young researcher, especially a student, to list poster presentations on a CV. As you say, it isn't just the "...


4

Is this the most widely held view among scientists? In principle, yes; in practice, perhaps not. But that's not the question you want to ask. Is this the most widely held view among theoretical computer scientists? Yes, it is. The most widely held view in theoretical computer science is that authorship requires a significant intellectual contribution ...


3

The criteria for authorship may somehow vary by discipline. The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) stipulates four criteria that must be met if someone is to deserve authorship. Substantial contributions to the conception or design of the work; or the acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data for the work; AND ...


3

This is a common dilemma in academia that can quickly escalate to sorrow. My advice is short and straightforward: once the manuscript is ready from your side, politely approach your both supervisors and ask them directly about their expectations concerning authorship. I understand the situation may feel uncomfortable and you'd prefer to make this decision ...


3

I have worked in China as a postdoc for two years, recently. I have come to know a lot about Chinese academic culture. Thus, I will try to answer your question. As someone mentioned in comments, we don't know anything about your field. In my field, a [conference] abstract is usually not important per se, but provides a thermometer about potential authorship ...


2

I like the definition from the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, that is applicable to all fields, in my opinion: http://www.icmje.org/recommendations/browse/roles-and-responsibilities/defining-the-role-of-authors-and-contributors.html: The ICMJE recommends that authorship be based on the following 4 criteria: Substantial contributions ...


2

This is a "safety first" suggestion. While there is probably no ethical constraint here, I strongly suggest that you do what is expected and traditional in your field and location. You won't be in such a situation forever, provided that you graduate, and then you can choose according to more personal standards. At a minimum, however, you should acknowledge ...


2

This depends on the type of evaluation the committee is doing. In a "gross" evaluation, such as an evaluation done by non-specialists, or at the stage where a committe selects 30 out of 150 applications, the difference between single-authored and multi-authored papers can get lost in the noise. In particular this will happen if people use coarse ...


2

There isn’t a precise rule about such things, but to the extent that one can formulate a general principle, I’d say that the credit for an N-author article would almost always be greater - often significantly greater - than a 1/N fraction of the total credit. That is why collaboration is generally a profitable activity - it allows two or more people to ...


2

There are likely to be policies protecting trainees at your institution, and you should review those - including process for lodging complaints about scientific misconduct (which could apply to some of the behaviours you are worried about). You should also review policies about handling of data (of the sort your work with) to be sure that taking raw data ...


2

To answer your question shortly, if you have made a manuscript with her name on it and send it to her. Then yes you can't delete her name without giving her a deadline to come back with suggestions/corrections. And as jakebeal mentions, just because you do something again, does not equal that she never did anything. I can easy see that you are very angry ...


1

As Bryan and Buffy stated, it can depend on the field and I won't go into that for my answer. I would add a bit to Buffy's answer regarding where you are in your career. If you're a tenured professor, then it probably doesn't make much difference whether you have it on your CV or not--publications matter more anyways. But if you're a graduate student or post-...


1

If you expect to continue to be on this student's papers or to have her on yours, go ahead. After all there are a huge amount of professors tacking onto papers where all they did was write a grant. It is a good way to boost your count. And you'll still have first on your papers, doesn't hurt to add others. That said, if you think/want no further ...


1

As a PhD student, it is always worthwhile increasing your publication list and if the 'real' authors are happy to invite you, then it's certainly acceptable. It then comes down to your personal comfort. I have been in similar situations where I provided what I consider to be general assistance without any real intellectual input: coding assistance, editing ...


1

If your de jure advisor, does not mind to omit the co-authorship, than go ahead. As for the de facto advisor, please take care of her! If the de jure advisor expects the co-authorship, than give it to him. (In theory, co-authorship reflects an actual scientific contribution. But in practice, these are often given to the PI who just procured funding. ...


1

That depends on your field. In my field (bioinformatics / biomedicine) co-authorships have almost no value (because being author number 12 out of 23 is not much of an achievement). What really counts is if you are first author (=first position) or senior author (=last position). But authoring a paper alone looks also a bit odd as you might look like a ...


1

Whether any of it is possible and what the result will be can only be answered by the journal itself. So, ask them for advice on how to proceed. This will vary by journal. You need to ask them.


1

Actually, the concept of "first author" is a bit foreign to CS in most places. Authors are listed alphabetically and only contributors are listed as authors. You say the supervisor contributed to the paper and if so should be an author. I think you are correct to refuse if it is your thesis that is being published, and I think the university will back you ...


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