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But according to our university licensing, consulting does not lead to any authorship for the mentor. You may want to consider double-checking what exactly that means. It's highly likely that your university does not forbid you to be co-author of a paper written under your supervision if you contributed intellectually to the paper, which is the case if the ...


24

Journals do not care about the credentials of the authors. They care about the quality of the paper. A low-quality paper by a BSc student will be rejected, just as a low-quality paper by a full professor will be rejected. [You can find other questions on this in the forum.] The main point here: they will not accept a bad paper just because it is written ...


15

I published multiple papers with my BSc and MSc students. Some loose observations: It is easier for you, the advisor, to write the manuscript, even if the student has already written their thesis. Proper scientific language with very concise and controlled wording is a matter of exercise. Your student might have not enough of it, even if their thesis is ...


12

I have several (3) papers published in good math journals, where the research was done jointly with either a BSc level student or below. I expect three more papers where my former master student is a coauthor, where one of the papers is the continuation of his masters thesis. There are no issues whatsoever, in my experience, only quality matters. I suggest ...


9

Is it common to make seniority distinctions between coauthors of a paper in math? This is uncommon. However it seems less unusual to refer to something one of the authors did, e.g.: In a previous result [2] by one of the authors, it is shown that ... or: This builds on prior work of the first author [3], namely, ... As Andrés E. Caicedo says in the ...


5

Is this possible to drop an author from authors' list of a paper after revision? Perhaps, but very very unusual. This should really never happen - the only case I can see reasonable is if someone was included as an author but either found their own contributions to be insufficient or disagreed with the publication and requested that they be removed from the ...


4

I'll guess that this is pretty uncommon, but the situation itself is a bit uncommon. Perhaps it is just that the senior professor is mentor to all of the others and they want to honor the person. It may well be that one person produces a key result that the others then explore, develop, and they put it all together. I did something similar (maybe even more ...


2

TL;DR It shouldn't matter that much what their degree level is. Your affiliation will probably make the most difference, to the extent that it makes a difference. When I was an undergraduate, I had a job as a research assistant in our chemical engineering department. We did not have any graduate research assistants at the time in our group, and we ...


1

It seems rather unusual, and I consider it bad style to use a descriptor that readers will not be able to figure out unless they consult the list of references. (With "first author" you can at least get a reminder by looking at the running header.) It is, of course, possible that the first author is indeed the senior author, and in the context of the journal ...


1

It is definitely possible, and I would actually encourage students to do so if they intend to pursue an academic career. I had the privilege of having incredibly supporting mentors, and published the work for my BSc thesis as a first author in an IEEE journal (not even a member). The bio explicitly stated my BSc status. Being thrown into research like that ...


1

My take from your description is that the surgeon gave you his clear permission to publish without his name attached -- in the form of a written text message. Assuming that the wording in the text message is unambiguous, there ought to be nothing for you to worry about: He's expressed his opinion, and you're free to proceed.


1

In most fields, there would be a great deal of difference between the bar for authorship and the bar for true equal contribution. In this situation, from your description, it seems that your co-author probably meets the bar for authorship, but of course not equal contribution. Below are some of your statements that were evidence for this, at least in my ...


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