14

The answer for appropriate author order is very dependent on the culture of your (sub)field. For example, if you are a computer engineer, you should probably be second author, while if you are a biological engineer, you should probably be last author. Follow whatever you see others doing in the venues where you are submitting. That said, these days it is ...


7

This is not about the relationships with the former advisor at all. The list of authors is supposed to be determined based on who actually worked on the particular research (which sometimes – however good or bad it is – may mean simply being a supervisor and providing funding). If the researcher contributed to several of the formulation of hypothesis data ...


6

This is hard to give good advice about without a lot of context. What is ethical and what is done (in some fields) don't necessarily match up well. In some fields, an advisor is often a co-author - even first author. If the other person has made no contribution to the paper then, ethically, the request is wrong. But you may need to accede to it just out of ...


6

Yes, your advisor behaviour is unprofessional and certainly against the ethical policies of virtually any serious publisher. I'd contact the other coauthor and write a joint email along the following lines (modify according to your knowledge of the situation): Dear X, We are disappointed by your refusal to share the final versions of the ...


4

Unless you are willing to make a formal complaint through the university or the journal, there is probably little you can do. But don't work with this person in the future. That should be obvious. If you are already clear of his influence and ability to sabotage you, then a formal complaint might be worth doing, but more for the benefit of future ...


4

Removing the advisor's name from the paper does not fix the underlying issue preventing you from submitting to journal X, which is the prevention of conflicts of interest. By removing your advisor from the author list and submitting to X, she wouldn't have to make an editorial decision about her own paper, but will now have to make that decision about her ...


4

I suggest that you try to get the professor to arrange a three way meeting to resolve the issues. I'd also suggest that you be generous about who is a co-author and even who is first. Any forward movement is probably better for you than letting it go. There will always be other papers and you might be able to use this as a basis for future work if you can ...


4

Usually, nothing happens, except damage to the submitting author's reputation. Anything could happen. It depends on the coauthor's feeling and the content of the paper. If the content of the paper is objectionable, then this might lead to retraction. Potentially the submitting author could be fired. But most likely, if a coauthor complains, the ...


3

Yes, of course you can ask. But in some fields there are other considerations that are considered important and first authorship is assigned for reasons not obvious to people from other fields. Sometimes those reasons are just political, but people go along with them to keep peace. It might also be necessary to keep the peace with a supervisor who has ...


2

Possibly not related to your case, but I have had somewhat similar experience before. One aspect you maybe haven't considered, and maybe more or less likely depending on the field, is if there was some underlying issue with the paper or results themselves. I have had a case or two, most often when working with newer students, that a seemingly great paper ...


2

There are really two questions here: (1) Is the request ethical/fair? (2) Should you agree to the request? Unfortunately, these two can be quite independent, and we can only honestly answer the first. It is neither ethical nor fair, going by the information you've provided. Its safe to say that this would be a form of exploitation, even if it doesn't add to ...


2

If the co-author is fine with the content of the paper, then submitting it without his/her knowledge isn't that big a deal - (s)he's likely to approve anyway. I'm guessing that this (point 3 in the case listed by COPE) is a big part of the reason why half the Forum suggested the editor do nothing. Another big part could be that the paper has apparently ...


1

I don't see the problem here as one of co-authorship, but one of potential plagiarism. That is easy to avoid with proper citation. But it depends, also, on what you intend to do in the papers. In a similar case, suppose you found the software and the original papers online or elsewhere and you do some derived work. The originals were done by people who are ...


1

Many fields have rules for deciding who should be an author. See for example http://www.icmje.org/recommendations/browse/roles-and-responsibilities/defining-the-role-of-authors-and-contributors.html#two for Medicine. This sets out four criteria which must be met to be an author. Using those criteria it seems that if your colleagues don’t want to engage ...


1

It sounds completely justifiable to be the first coauthor. Depending on how much work the drafts needed you may even qualify to be the first author. If the experimental data was near-useless, the ideas half-baked and you needed to do most of the heavy lifting you could definitely argue that. Something like this happened to me during my PhD. A colleague who'd ...


1

It might be a little late to contribute to this topic, but officially there is no such thing in Japan that foreigners cannot be first author of their papers if the material (data) upon which the paper is based on was obtained through Japanese government funds. It is certainly not an official rule in any Japanese research institution and he has just told you ...


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