Hot answers tagged

97

It seems like you have to have a conversation with your adviser. There is certainly nothing wrong with your approach: You read through code on which you have knowledge and something to say; you then were proactive and wanted to fix the issue; all of these are commendable. If you happen to have been mistaken, well, that happens -- but then that's what patch ...


67

These days I see myself as useless and miserable person that just works more than 12 hours per day and the other 12 hours that I suppose to rest or sleep still I'm thinking about my research but I'm not happy, I don't have any friends, I'm depressed, I'm nervous, I'm stressful, etc. So, yeah I'm angry that people hates me if even I tell them the truth. It ...


36

I don't see any integrity issues. Your intentions seemed to be to correct an error. Unless your intention was to sabotage your competition, there is nothing wrong with this. Possibily, your mentor believes you should have checked with others first, but acting rashly is not academic dishonesty.


21

Are you sure your adviser understood what you did? The concept of GitHub, PRs etc. may be alien to him and he could have understood that you publicly stated that his formula is incorrect, in a non-peer reviewed thing (I am making that up, just to show that interpretations can escalate quickly). When you cool down, have a conversation with him clearly ...


20

Speaking from the US perspective, there are a couple of pros and cons I can make: CONS: You will be the one who sets up a research environment (especially if you are only grad student of your PI, and no postdoc involves). Setting up the lab, the equipment, learning softwares, training newcomers will fall on you. And you will be expected to keep up with ...


15

A few things come to mind. The first is that after you've graduated their recommendation letter (if you need one) may carry less weight than that of a more senior academic with a longer track record. They probably also have a smaller professional network and cannot help you as much with finding opportunities afterwards than a more senior academic could. The ...


11

There are a few things to consider and clarify: GitHub is not an authoritative academic reference. Journal papers are expected to be thoroughly reviewed and free from most usual mistakes. They have their process for correcting mistakes, which is different from GitHub, where a single person and not necessarily a committee decides what is best for the code. ...


7

I am in a similar situation, whereby I am my supervisor's first PhD student, and she has just started out as head of department. I find myself agreeing with the comment of Vibex, in the sense that your supervisor may struggle to support you with non-scientific endeavours, such as access to facilities and so on. I know this has been the case for me, even ...


7

I can't judge whether the advisor is making a correct evaluation and being a jerk about it, or just being a jerk. But, at a minimum, you need a different advisor. It should be someone who has some faith in you and encourages your best work. Staying where you are, under this advisor, is unlikely to result in success. But you have to evaluate your own ...


6

Welcome to the club of being a miserable postdoc! I was and am in quite a similar situation. I had the benefit of my first postdoc being with a horrible boss and lab, and my second being with an amazing boss and lab, so it has been easy to figure out which aspects of postdocing are me sucking and which aspects are the environment sucking. During the ...


5

This may be country specific, but there are a couple of points I would make. First, in the (UK) departments I know, there must be more than one faculty member involved in the supervisory team, and a completely inexperienced faculty member would not be allowed to lead (officially). It would be worth checking beforehand if there's a plan to have more faculty ...


4

First, this is not an unusual situation. What is unusual here is your interpretation of the situation. When you have a problem with someone's behavior, it is wise to look for incompetence instead of malice. It's highly likely the professor intended to keep his promises but failed to do so. You have given us no evidence otherwise. Professors commonly ...


4

The results of teamwork are not solely yours, and you have to be mindful how you share them. As Mefitico mentioned in their answer, you may not have the rights to use the code you offered to that project. It's important to note that "open source" or "on GitHub" doesn't mean "do whatever" (though there is a license for that too). For example, the popular MIT ...


4

There may be a few situations in which, from what you describe, your advisor considers an issue of academic integrity. It is not clear what the exact situation of 'your reference' is referring to though. These are pretty speculative until your question is more refined. 1) You are referring to work that is yet to be published or reviewed by your advisor ...


3

No, posting an issue on GitHub is not an academic integrity violation Based on the facts that you have laid out, there is nothing that remotely resembles an academic integrity violation. You say you have provided a reference to the "correct" formula. I understand you to mean that both the approximation and the exact methods are published and widely known. ...


3

I believe that academic tree does not impact your work. However it is something that is really cool and gives you a sense of responsibility that you are carrying some of the most significant names of the industry. Having these names associated to you will give you a sense of pride and honor and that is all what it is. In addition to that it may also be used ...


3

Switching now seems like a poor choice. You can finish in a bit, you say. And then you can change areas. Your old professor is happy with you. You have a success under your belt. The world is open to you. Anyone can change at any time. There is no real reason to waste your past work. You can then take up, somehow, in the new area, perhaps with the other ...


2

To make the answer formal, yes, you should ask him. This is best done in person, and one of the best approaches is just what you say here about his skill and your common interest in a topic. Let him know that you think he is the best person around to do this, and you won't have a problem, yourself, if he can't be at the graduation. What you need is his ...


2

Having been in a similar situation before, I can say this: Prof. X may not want to finish a paper with you if you're changing advisors, and Prof. Z may not want you to continue spending time on unrelated research. Does Prof. Z even know of your intentions? You should make sure Z actually wants to be your advisor first. Does Prof. X know you've already ...


2

Firstly, on behalf of university academics, I'm very sorry you are being subjected to that kind of talk about your performance. What you are describing is not constructive criticism, and it is not a good way to give feedback to a student (even if their work is actually terrible). It sounds like your advisor is acting out of frustration, and has lost the ...


2

In addition to some of the main points in the other answers, namely: a junior faculty might not have as strong as an academic network as a senior faculty, which possibly limits your opportunities for conferences, jobs, etc down the line from lack of experience, a junior faculty might be more at a loss of how to best guide you and help you through struggles ...


2

Choose your committee wisely and be close to them. Many of the possible shortcomings of having a new advisor can be overcome by more established committee members. Example problems and how I've seen committee members help out: Your advisor does not get tenure and needs to leave before you can graduate: You can get handed off to a senior committee member. ...


1

I am sorry for what happened to you, even if I don't know wether wrong formula is actually wrong or not. A country/cultural tag could be interested there, since I think your last edit presents a very rude reaction from you supervisor. I would recommend something that is often said in company world, but is actually a matter of fact and should be thought ...


1

Don't feel bad. I'll assume that you had already earned the grade before you left. He may also have gotten some message about why you left and decided you had met the standard. But it would be good, for many reasons, to send him an email with thanks and a bit of an explanation about your need to leave. I once had a practice in a few courses that students ...


1

It sounds as if your PhD supervisor is less than ideal. I would say your priorities should be: Finishing the PhD dissertation so you can graduate. Consolidating your postdoc position. Finish the old paper. Your PhD supervisor has different priorities than you, so you have to be the guardian of your interests. You make sure to wrap up your dissertation ...


1

I am currently in a similar position to the one you describe, except that in my case I agreed to take on a brand new side project with my previous supervisor. I spoke to my postdoc supervisor about the project as soon as I started and received his go-ahead to spend some of my time working on it. In my experience, it seemed like my postdoc supervisor thought ...


1

You present a hard problem with many possible pitfalls. Only you can navigate the various traps and it depends on knowing more than you can say here. Personality matters as do both general academic rules and the specific traditions of your field of study. I can't give an answer, but can suggest some things to consider. First, is you advisor a co-author by ...


1

You sound like a thoughtful and honest person. Being into Menotring, service and teaching is a great reason to want to be and academic, because it is 90% of the job as fa faculty member. I can't speak for your field, but in my field it would be not be unusual for a postdoc to produce little in the first 5 months. So its possible you are doing better than ...


1

This is not right! I don't see any underlying support in the advisor's attitude. Don't be afraid to take whatever action necessary to get yourself into a situation where your personal skills are given the opportunity to develop. It's your life and it's short. You can excel when you find the right way for yourself. Have some courage to not fit into anyone ...


1

He is saying you need to check whether you would be accepted into the school first. This information is probably on the school's web page. Possible things they might require are a certain level of grades on a relevant undergrad degree, letters of recommendation, maybe you need to be a citizen or landed immigrant in the country or you will need to pay foreign ...


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