Hot answers tagged

54

I think most of how to approach this depends far too much on your individual relationship, which no one here can know as well as you. However, one general rule to keep in mind would be to stick to talking about things that would/could have helped you rather than things they did wrong/"need" to change. You can even keep quite distant from their ...


46

I would suggest not mentioning it unless it becomes an issue. Your medical condition and treatment is your own business. And you are indicating no issues with your progress. Let it go. You are doing the right thing by taking your meds. If asked about an absence for therapy, just indicate a doctor's appointment. In a non-lab based field, the specific hours ...


31

This is highly advisor-dependent! I'll first give an answer from my perspective, and then some advice on whether that applies to your advisor. My experience in advising is that when students are dealing with anxiety or depression that I can do a better job giving good advice when the student is somewhat forthright about what's going on. So if you were my ...


28

I strongly recommend to have a conversation about this with the supervision very soon. If the supervisor is going to be non-cooperative, the most convenient time to learn about this is now - because the cost of changing supervisor is going to be the lowest now. An attempt to coerce the supervisor into providing reasonable accommodations via the disability ...


26

A few things to consider: Consult the rules for PhD students at your university (I assume you are one). The university where I did my PhD had rules stating that a student needed permission by their supervisor to submit stuff for publication. My understanding is that such rules are rare however. If I put myself into the shoes of your supervisor, I would ...


25

There is a delicate balance here that only you can resolve. It is good to keep advisors advised, so to speak, about your activities. Most will support you provided that the tangential stuff doesn't detract from your main work. OTOH, you need to consider personalities. There are certainly those who would object, but you can probably judge that from past ...


14

I've been in a very similar situation about two years ago. Now I'm a PhD student. While you are not under any obligation to tell them, I would strongly advise that you do. There are multiple reasons why: It will most likely improve your paper. Talking to people about your research tends to improve your research. Especially if the people are more ...


12

Since you are (I guess) not an expert on supervision you may not offer advice on supervision. However, you are an expert on getting supervised by your advisor, so you are the best qualified person to give feedback about how the supervision went. So my advice about this would be: Ask your advisor if they would appreciate some feedback about the process of ...


12

What kind of graduate program are you trying to get into? In pure mathematics and many parts of applied mathematics and theoretical computer science, no one cares about author order, and the convention is that authors are listed alphabetically. So, I’m not entirely sure, but I think you may have some misconceptions about the reasons for your advisor’s ...


10

Disclaimer: I had similar issues during my masters thesis, w/o the anti-depressants. In hindsight I probably should have talked to my advisors about my problems, but I totally agree with anyone saying that it is highly depending on your advisors. Mine very likely would have been understanding. If you feel comfortable enough, talk to someone besides your ...


10

I have been in your exact situation many, many times. More often than not, my temptation (and often what I do) is to send an email a day in advance like "I haven't made much progress since last week. I would be happy to meet if you have something you would like to discuss, but I am also happy to use the time to continue making progress on what we ...


9

Persons with depression and/or anxiety can have very different disease trajectories and it is very hard to anticipate severity, length of episodes, reactions to treatment and medication, etc. For this reason, I would be very careful with sharing "what might happen"-sort of information. Talking to the disability office (what a horrible name) is a ...


8

Since you're an undergrad, I suggest that you're not the most experienced with the dynamics of presenting at a conference, the subtleties about which conference is the best for your type of work, and a whole bunch of other things. Also, since you're an undergrad, you don't have any real allegiance to any PI. Your time is largely your own (assuming you haven'...


7

I'd guess you are overreacting and overthinking this. Perhaps he forgot. Perhaps he had something very important come up. It is even possible that he did come, but you had stepped out momentarily and he missed you. Physical therapy might have been necessary. Lots of things. Don't expect professors to return email immediately. It isn't like you are a group of ...


6

If you have a therapist already, you should ask them for their advice rather than trust amateurs like us to help you. It's what they're for, isn't it?


6

Since you have not mentioned any recent papers, I'm going to assume that you are stuck finding papers on this topic. A simple Google Scholar search for "queen bee academia" turns up a number of relevant results, including Ellemers et al (2004) and Faniko et al (2020), which both seem to address the phenomenon of interest to you. Now, obviously ...


6

In a field like mine (math or cs) it is perfectly natural for research to proceed at an uneven pace. I suspect that is true in many fields. I'd guess your advisor won't be too surprised if you tell them. But you can just ask if they think a meeting is needed and whether there might be things to discuss and ideas to pursue. And, "not working" for a ...


4

I think this week is particularly more important for you to meet your advisor. I would suggest you meet with your advisor and discuss with him the reason why you were not able to make much progress. Was it because of the nature of question you're working on? Is the question/solution not clear to you? Was it because of lack of prerequisites? In which case he ...


4

Yes, they should complain. To whom is difficult to answer without being closer to the situation; I would have some idea in my US organization but not about what the organization is like at your friend's university. For me, step one would probably have been with the office folk in my grad program. They'd be acutely aware that this isn't normal and have ...


4

I wouldn't recommend it. Standards vary but from my experience, it can be seen as trying to influence your chance of admission. Generally speaking, if you want to contact faculty before getting accepted, the appropriate time to contact them is before submitting your application (and even then, it's not uncommon to be turned down). Again, standards vary and I'...


3

This a tough situation to be in. During my Ph.D studies I was lucky with my supervisor who actively engaged with me in my research. A friend of mine was unfortunate with his supervisor. About half way through the supervisor became heavily involved in a new discovery in his field and all but forgot his student. He was very difficult to engage with and my ...


3

Some departments do exit interviews with graduating students. This is another venue where you can give feedback about your experience (with your advisor and elsewhere) via a 3rd party (sometimes it's the chair, or another professor doing the exit interview). Going to conferences with your advisor is a great point, and something that all the students in your ...


2

Unfortunately you are in a bad place, but you have to make the best use of the resources that you have available. I don't think that using a professor from a different institution is necessarily bad, provided that they can honestly predict your future success. You might also talk to the Head and see if there is something they can suggest. They have a ...


2

Little you can do beyond appeal to the professor. But perhaps your institution has an ombuds who will intervene on your behalf, or an office that deals with exceptions for people with medical (and/or) other conditions. Since it is the first exam, if you show a completely different profile in subsequent exams and other work, perhaps the professor would be ...


2

Do not spend extra months to produce new results on this dead horse. It looks to me you undertook an ambitious thesis (very high risk, moderately high reward) ... and it turned out unsuccesful. However, you are not the one to blame: there is a thesis advisor exactly to avoid these dead-ends. Do not blame yourself, your advisor should have know better. ...


2

Other answers focus on giving feedback on what would have helped you, and this is great advice. Additionally, you could frame the feedback to help junior members of the group. This is gives actionable advice that can be put to use now, which is more likely to have an impact. Student X would benefit from attending conference Y with you. I would have ...


1

It could be a good experience, as you are more independent, and thus has to take more responsibility. However, as the advisor is less familiar with the field, it is crucial that you do a thorough literature review first, to ensure that the problem you are trying to solve has not already been solved. Also, note that after a PhD, you are very likely (expected, ...


1

A (research) meeting does not have to be just about reporting progress. It can be about bringing everyone involved up to date about the status of activities relevant to the success of the (research) project. Create a summary template with this view in mind. Report of New Discoveries Example: Report on literature that you read that impacts the direction of ...


1

There could be many reasons as to why your advisor wants to be listed as the first author, i.e. for reasons of funding. There may also be certain conventions to consider here, e.g. that a prof. is expected to be listed as the main author, or that alphabetical order is used generally. The bottom line of what I am trying to say is that there may be very good ...


1

As other have said you should follow their instructions. I just wanted to point out that you will have opportunities after admission but before deciding where to go to get answers to your questions. In my experience in math, this post-admission pre-decision time is the appropriate window to talk to potential advisors.


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