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93

I don't know what field you're in, but in mine, writing such a paper would be viewed as unnecessary and perhaps a bit strange. You seem to feel that you don't deserve your place with this supervisor, and so you need to prove your worth, or impress them, by writing a paper. This is unecessary, as you have already impressed them with your project idea and PhD ...


55

Congratulations! In my opinion, it is perfectly polite to write back and say that you are interested, but can't afford to make a significant time commitment to the project. Ideally, the professor will be happy to do the work himself, and your role would largely be to look over the finished product, sign off on it, and make suggestions or comments. It's fine ...


45

An important thing to note here is that often these dropped headers don't happen because the email is merely short, but usually because the email chain starts to approximate a conversation, i.e. a quick succession of short replies. So the formalities shift from those of writing letters to those of talking in person. So maybe take some cues from there. In ...


45

I have worked with supervisors who are very humble while successful to those who are extremely egoistic due to their accomplishments. In my personal opinion, it is not wise to give Godly status to any person. He is your PhD supervisor, a famous one, but there are thousands of famous people in this world. And fame is subjective. Be professional, be polite and ...


31

When I was in medical devices we had lab books to support potential patent claims etc.. Write your ideas in a lab book. If it happens again, you could try to say something like, 'I think I may have a communication issue. I suggested this idea on xxx but it appears I may not have communicated the concept very well. Perhaps I'm letting myself down in ...


28

There are several possible explanations for this. First, maybe your advisors couldn't fully understand your ideas because you are still not fluent in the jargons of the field. Second, (as suggested by Steven Gubkin in the comment), it is possible that your idea and your advisor's idea are actually different, but the difference is perhaps too subtle for you ...


26

I think you're correct that the supervisor role can be equivalent to normal collaboration in that the student will bring their own unique ideas, knowledge, and experience to build on a mutual project collaboratively. However, where I think there is an unavoidable difference (at least, in every student I have met including myself) is the conception of viable ...


24

Would there be anything to gain from doing this if I don't intend to pursue a career in academia? Of course! You can put it in your CV. You might not need it for whatever job you're going for (are you sure you don't?), but you still have a rare opportunity that's worth bragging about which you give up by declining. Remember, the future is uncertain, and ...


21

This focuses on the first part of the question, i.e., whether there could be anything to gain from writing the paper. The other answers cover the second part. Some industry jobs in computer science require or prefer applicants to have a master’s or PhD degree, or some research experience. If you wish to apply for such jobs now or in the future, a paper could ...


20

In my experience, it should be fine to drop the salutation given that the other person has done so before you in that same chain. But if in doubt then err on the more formal side. It's always a good idea to emulate the email style of the other person in a one-on-one chain (unless you have some reason for wanting to maintain formality).


17

Yes, you might have a communication problem. Hopefully that will improve over time as you are still new at this. But, if the "new" idea appeals to you, I suggest that you swallow your pride and run with it. Never mind that someone else thinks they thought of it first. It is possible that your earlier suggestion is what put that thought into their ...


16

Even though you have not indicated where your Ph.D. studies are going to be, it is clear from your description of your advisor's behavior that he is not expecting special deference to him. I would say that the way to show him respect is to trust him when he says "don't do that." Then learn as much as you can in the program, and accomplish great ...


15

Disclaimer: Customs and individual preferences can differ, and this is my best guess. I wouldn't recommend that you show particular deference to your advisor, just because he is famous. Be respectful and polite of course, and deferential to some extent, but it's not necessary to be more so than if your advisor was lesser-known. I wouldn't recommend ...


13

This is a poor supervisory practice. Unfortunately, it becomes increasingly common in Universities, particularly in countries with strong marketalization of Higher Education (e.g. US, UK). Students are treated as customers, and academics are assessed and promoted based on their efficiency (meaning the number of students they supervise), not the quality of ...


12

It may be fine for the professor to write the paper without your cooperation, but NOT so fine to omit you as a co-author if the work is yours. You should be a co-author, though need not contribute further to the project. A co-author need not be involved in every aspect of a publication. If you created it, you are rightfully an author. It isn't the "...


12

In some places, a masters is mostly based on coursework. A thesis, if even required, can be pretty pro-forma. It can just be intended as a learning experience for the student, rather than a serious attempt to create anything new. My own situation was a bit different, but the thesis was really just a review of a small area of math, bringing a couple of ideas ...


10

I usually find it's good to start and end formally, but for little in-between messages that are around one line and easy to answer it's fine to be informal. Unless the person is really arrogant, they won't find it disrespectful if you do this (especially if they've done it first), although it depends a bit on your relationship to them. Maybe something like ...


10

It is not necessary to know a professor before applying for a PhD in the UK. I have so far supervised 8 PhD students, only one of whom I knew before they started their PhD. There are two routes to a PhD in the UK. First is to apply for an advertised position or program. This is how the majority of PhDs are recruited, but it is also usually only open to home ...


10

It's much more important to send something right away, so that they have as much time as possible to look at it, rather than wasting precious hours finding just the right words. State clearly and concisely what you are asking them to do, and when you need it done by Explain briefly the reason for the short deadline Apologize for the rush and acknowledge ...


10

I don't think I have ever seen anybody ever "thank their advisor/supervisor(s)" (in a presentation or press statement) without explicitly name them. One of the purposes of such a statement is to communicate the existence of a particular student-advisor relationship. There is a number of reason someone might want to do so: The relationship will ...


10

Others have already mentioned the benefits in terms of CV enhancement and similar, but there also are some direct benefits for a non-academic career: You get experience with communicating your results, be it in writing or public speaking (should you present at that conference). In particular you have the opportunity to get insight into the process of ...


7

Interdisciplinary! There is your problem right there. It's a recipe for problems. Too many cooks ... Any project with more than one manager is tough. I had this problem in a job once. On appointment I had a single manager, we got on famously and everyone was happy. After restructuring imposed from above, my manager's job turned into something else and his ...


7

In the UK there are 3 types of master's degree. An MA/MSc is usually what is called a "taught masters" or post-graduate taught (PGT). An MRes is referred to as a "masters by research" or postgraduate-research (PGR), and then you have "integrated masters" where the master's degree is part of an extended undergraduate. The title ...


6

If you're looking for an unbiased expert opinion on whether the hours you'd have to put in are worth it, you're looking in the wrong place. A publication is valued in academia, but is it equally valued in the career path you envision? Though a publication will undoubtedly improve your CV, the time spent on it could have been spent on activities that improve ...


6

As an engineer, who has never worked in academia, I would recommend doing it with a limit on your time commitment. It is a great CV enhancer, much of engineering is writing and communicating. This will be especially important if you strike out on your own. The skills to be a good engineer are not the same as the skills to be a good freelancer. Most ...


6

This is a symptom of bad supervisory practice. While it is true that Masters students are not in general required to conduct original research, they should be taught the state of the art. In this case the supervisors have taught the same theory and methods repeatedly for 14 years. This indicates that the supervisors are not continually improving their ...


5

For me, this, like so many questions, has a simple answer. If you are not sure about something, ask the person involved. In this case that person would be your professor. You need to know the level of commitment required of you. Here is my suggestion (to be put in your own words of course). Thank you for your email/whatever, Thank you so much for all your ...


4

First of all, I wouldn't seek an advisor. Under your circumstances, you shouldn't expect a professor to assume any sort of responsibility for you. That said, you might be able to find someone who is willing to help you. Here are two ideas: Find a graduate course that you are interested in, and ask the professor if you can sit in on it. The professor might ...


4

I think the core issue you are describing is relevant for many PhD students. Your mental health may excabate the effects, but does not seem central to the situation to me. A PhD is a journey through uncharted territory, and that can feel uncomfortable. So in particular for industrious students, there always is a temptation to to not go where the dragons are ...


4

Best way to show your gratitude and respect would be to do good/great work during this program. Show that he made the right choice.


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