Hot answers tagged

66

If your advisors know of the problem, they can help fix it. For example, perhaps they might suggest submitting the article to a different conference. Even if the problem is not fixable, they can still help mitigate it, e.g. by mentioning in any reference letters that you have written a marvelous piece of work that wasn't published because of some confusion ...


30

Some PhD students need micromanagement. Some are harmed by it. Some supervisors know how to customise things to the needs of the student. Some supervisors do not know how to micromanage. Some some do not know how to not micromanage. Tell your supervisor what you want. Listen to your supervisor's feedback - what you want might not be possible. If you ...


27

There is no predicting personality without close study, but if the person is a true scholar they will welcome an advance, even if it refutes something they did earlier. No, hostility isn't an unreasonable possibility. But whether it is likely depends on the person. Impossible to say how likely. You are in a better position to judge, knowing them. Are they ...


12

A useful view on this is offered by the situational leadership model (Paul Hersey and Ken Blanchard). The idea to match one's leadership style to the needs of the supervised person. People generally start out with low competence and high commitment levels (D1 in figure below) and, therefore, benefit the most from a directing leadership style, which could be ...


8

The danger lies in the collateral damage that your refutation (and better, probably simpler hypothesis) does: Your prof might have other projects running which rely on his original theory. Check if that's the case, and discuss with the people who are working on it. Your prof and the others will either stubbornly defend their original approach (because their ...


7

I've had experience with similar issues and in my opinion, honesty is the best policy assuming that your advisor is a reasonable, non-vindictive person. If the issue is just the topic and the area, and not your advisor personally, then they probably want what's best for you and could actually help you out in working out the details (perhaps offering you an ...


7

Yes, you should thank him. You don't need to work with him in future, but, as you say, he helped you along. He helped you start your career and you can now be independent. If you did good work under his guidance it is worth a thank you, and you may be well positioned for good works in the future. There are a lot of racists around, of course, and many of them ...


6

A lot of this is going to depend on what your field and your time limit is. I'm a molecular biologist/bioinformatician in the UK. Students who come to me have 3.5 year to finish collecting data and another 6 months to submit their thesis. This means there is not a lot of time to lose, especially if you want to publish in that time as well. In my field an ...


5

My own personal philosophy is this: if your advisor suggests that you should do something, you should probably do it. But if your advisor suggests that you shouldn't bother... consider doing it anyway. He is very detail oriented and tries to understand every step you do. I meet him twice a week, and it is basically a do this, show me this next time. This ...


4

As a first-year graduate student, your focus, besides classes, is on building your research skills. I would be elated to have an advisor who is obviously involved in your education, responsive to your questions, and interested in the details of your experiments, not just the production of data. Consider this a confidence-building and expectation-setting ...


4

My answer doesn't speak directly to the situation with your potential advisor: I think that depends on your presentation of your approach, and the advisor's personality (I agreed that it does have the potential to backfire). I want to discuss the challenges you are likely to experience with this situation his theory is relatively unexplainable ... [my] ...


4

Do know that there are a lot of moving parts in this dynamic: your and your advisor's personality, interaction, language proficiency, etc. factor in as well. In term of convention on how much and advisor edit the student's work, there is none. Some like to be more hands on, treating it as a collaboration; some like to be more hands off, treating it as a ...


4

TLDR IMO (and based on classic answers of the Workplace Stack Exchange): Never inform your current employer of your intent to leave until your new employment is 100% secure. Adding to @Spark's excellent answer, I would make a few recommendations based on my conversations with other graduate students in similar situations. Make sure that your place in the ...


3

Essentially, my question is how good are my chances of getting into a highly competitive program if it seems the advisor is very much on my side? If this is your main question, then I think there is no clear answer that will satisfy you. I think the question with a more useful answer might be Should I bank on getting into the PhD program because the advisor ...


3

When I edit a student's thesis, my intention is to make suggestions, not demands, even when the editing was done by writing my comments in red all over a printed copy of the student's draft. Of course, some of my comments are corrections, which a student would obviously accept, but some are matters of judgment, and a student might well disagree. I'd discuss ...


3

It's your advisor's job to prepare you for a professional career. That should include helping you learn to write in the style and up to the standards of your discipline. Your thesis is a good place to learn to write better - even though it is "just a thesis". It is still yours. Your advisor's writing critique improves this piece of work and future ...


2

I do not know whether the low number of former PhD students per se is a good sign or bad. A high number of dropouts and former students consistently ending up at very mediocre jobs in academia would definitely be a ground for concern. In what follows, I address a slightly broader question. You might find it helpful to change your perspective from the good/...


2

There is probably no issue here and the careers of his students are determined primarily by their actions, not his. It might be a function of the popularity of the subfield in which they work. But if the professor is listed in the Mathematics Genealogy Project you can find the titles of the dissertations of the students and check for yourself whether their ...


2

Hope you are well. Okay so since you have already applied to the program as per your supervisor - You can reach out to him through email to let him know that you have applied to the program and you will be keeping him in the loop in case of any updates. Along with this you can then ask regarding the research question and its specifics - Make sure the email ...


2

In my field survey papers are highly cited. If the same is true in your field than the low chance of success may be ofset by the high reward if you succeed. Regardless, you need an overview of what has happend in your field concerning your thesis. Making it an article forces you to really think through the relationships between the articles. For me it is ...


2

Be humble. It’s very possible and exciting that you might have found a weakness in his theory. But, beyond finding an error in a theorem and thus establishing them as incorrect on their own terms, theories in fields like behavioural economics are not ‘refutable’ per se. They are all wrong. Rather they often seek to explain important features of behaviour ...


2

Quickly write down a dozen possible titles, in short varied combinations of the key words you'd want someone to use to find your thesis. Avoid fillers like "developing" and "understanding". Prune the list and add to it the next day. Then perhaps look over the list with your advisor.


1

Unless you have some evidence that the professor engages in improper conduct (stealing the student's work), I suggest that you give her everything she asks for. There is no downside to this if the advisor is honest and helpful. The most likely explanation would be that she is trying hard to keep you on track and wants early warning if you seem to be ...


1

It seems that the offer provides several advantages over your current position. Thus, it is a good idea to move. Just make sure to explain clearly to your supervisor why you are leaving so that s/he could understand your decision. Try to stay in good terms. Also, if you can tell your supervisor a little bit in advance that you will leave and if you can ...


1

Honestly, if I were in your shoes, I would just be upfront about it with my advisor. It seems very clear from the text that moving to the other country would benefit you immensely and I believe that your advisor would both see and appreciate that. I have a question for you however - how come you got another PhD offer while you were on the verge of finishing ...


1

The comment of astronat is good. Most people would support you. But there is more. If you are happier, then you will probably do better work. Being in something that you aren't happy with is not good place to be. If there is any sort of retaliation it would be, I think, short lived and can be overcome. Other than lying, the person has no real way to say you ...


1

Given that the replication crisis is a real thing I would not overthink this. As long as you provide sound (statistical) evidence that supports your theory I would not hold back. I have encountered the same situation when writing my master's thesis. My advisor was not very well versed in statistics, disregarded basics assumptions of statistical tests like ...


1

It depends There is no single right answer to the question of how 'hands-on' a PhD supervisor should be. In principle, it should be determined by the nature of the project, your existing skills/expertise, and the extent to which the supervisor's skills/expertise are actually conducive to 'micromanagement' (in my discipline, it is rare for any one supervisor ...


1

One other thing to consider: Does your advisor have tenure? If he's coming up for tenure in a few years, it would be massively beneficial for him to manage you in the most optimum way possible to ramp up productivity. What you perceive as "micromanagement" might be him putting you on a path that is very well planned and thought out to get quick and ...


1

Can someone guide me on how is it possible? There are several ways that some people use to publish more papers per year: Some split their project in several ideas that can be published as separate papers to make as many papers as possible. For example, in CS, they may publish an algorithm in a conference paper, and then an optimized version of that ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible