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132

You (and some of the commenters) have a misconception about mathematics, and even research in general. You need to dispel that and present what you have done and learned in a way that satisfies your advisor so that you can finish your degree. Comments about research in general If your advisor knew the answer before giving you the problem, then it wouldn't ...


54

Does your superviser deserve an authorship? Check the following: Have they contributed to the research design, in form of suggesting a topic to investigate, advising on methodology, suggesting literature? Were they involved in evaluation of results, in form of checking them and contributing an opinion on whether the work is going in the right direction? ...


45

My mentor tells me that no magazines will accept me as a first author This is clearly wrong. Of course I cannot speak for every journal in your particular subfield, but rejecting papers only because of the academic rank of the first author would be ethically dubious. At the very least, there are some megajournals that do not have such criteria and which ...


29

Sadly, it may not be possible to do this and also get your degree. If the supervisor needs to sign off on your graduation and/or dissertation, then they have sufficient power to end your career before it starts, or at least delay it while you find a different advisor and maybe a different institution. I hate to keep giving this advice, but it may be your ...


18

if you have done most of the work that @Dmitry mentions, it is neither appropriate nor ethical your mentor to be the first author and, I can tell you from my experience, that in my field "no journal will accept the paper if the undergrad is the first author" is a total lie. As long as the paper stands as a proper scientific article written appropriately, you ...


15

First, I am an undergraduate student in math who started working under a professor last Fall. Congratulations! During January I sent him an email with a question though I did not expect a response until he got back. Given that he has presumably been back for 2 weeks, is it appropriate for me to send him another email with a follow-up or should I wait for ...


13

I think this question has already been given a perfect answer. But I would like to add something that I think might be highly important in your specific case: Do not trust numerical results. Before saying to your advisor that he is wrong, or even worse, trying to alert other people of this, make really really sure that you can trust the simulation results....


13

Lots of people are trying to tell you about negative vs positive results, but they might be a bit wide of the mark - it sounds like you see your difficulty as having an ill-defined problem statement, not a negative result for a well-defined problem statement. Previous answers are correct that "X is false" is a perfectly good result, even if you were hoping ...


12

Why not? A quick look at the controversy indicates that the disagreements were entirely around the editor-in-chief publishing his own papers in the journal, papers which were lightly reviewed + indulged in a lot of self-citation. This means: It's only the editor-in-chief's papers that are affected; none of the papers by other authors published in the paper ...


11

Update: She has revealed in the comments that the "mentor" is a Professor at the Docent level, which makes me more inclined to advise her to take advice from the mentor. "Mentor" on its own sounds like it could be a grad student, in which case the answer would be different. Furthermore the Professor is suggesting more co-authors to save costs on publication, ...


11

In my opinion, a student needs guidance, especially for a Master thesis or at the beginning of a PhD. I know very well what it is like when your advisor just gives you a general idea what to research, but does not really answer your questions or read the material you have already written. So I understand that the OP suffers. If the advisor gives you a ...


9

The advisor is literally contributing zero or close to zero to my project, nothing more than- or maybe less than- very basic supervision tasks, like giving some comments on a written text. Your problem is that you are not being advised. You can publish whatever paper with whoever as coauthors, nobody can stop you. But if you are in a program at an ...


8

You did not mention your country but at least if you are in Europe the contents your Master thesis do not matter. The Master degree does, of course, but nobody cares about what is in the thesis if it remotely makes sense. Have a chat with your advisor and turn it into a "I proved that X and Y do not work". It is perfectly fine. Have a quick look at other ...


8

I will add to Dmitry and Buffy's excellent answer to point out the following. You say "The advisor is literally contributing zero except [...] giving some comments on a written text." In my opinion, this makes them a co-author. He or she do not have to have physically edited the document themselves to add material or sections you had not considered, in ...


8

Strategically, it might be a good idea to prioritize helping the PhD student. You might gain some second authorships on papers, credit for PhD student supervision (which you will need for your next career step), and make a potential collaborator for life. It's a win-win situation. Honestly, in my experience, I did not meet many PhD students who receive ...


6

My supervisor has a bad reputation of forcing their name on papers at the final stage of research. The advisor is literally contributing zero You need a new advisor. If your advisor has a widespread bad reputation, that will hurt your reputation. As a side effect, a new advisor is likely to also contribute effectively and follow ethical standards for ...


6

I think you can send him a small piece of work at a time, such as the introduction. Try to utilise his/her time for the most important part of the work. For the introduction, you can ask him/her to proofread your contributions paragraph.


6

If you did all research yourself, then you can be the single author of the publication. Note that research includes the choice of the problem, the choice of methodology, the data collection and analysis, the evaluation and interpretation of results, and writing and editing of the paper. If you were helped/advised on any of these aspects, your collaborators ...


6

I would call it not only professional but close to mandatory. A supervisor has to be informed of special circumstances or reasons for specific behaviour in order to manage the team effectively, set realistic goals, assure the people are comfortable and to show basic human decency. You do not have to share something that makes you feel uncomfortable, and do ...


5

Would you rather pass your thesis, get a degree, and start to get control of your career or get blocked? It seems to be an easy choice. Don't lose track of the fact that this work isn't, hopefully, going to be the best work you ever do in your life, only the first (or an early one). Fighting with a supervisor who can be a block is seldom (never?) a good ...


4

If you're unhappy where you are and aren't getting support even though you've asked for it, and you've been offered a position elsewhere, I think you know logically what you should do. You should take that new position and hand in your notice to your current supervisor as soon as you can. Make a clean break of it and try to have some time off before starting ...


4

While her comments may be useful in the sense of publishing a manuscript in a certain journal, however, I am under the impression that a thesis should be more free and more of a full account You did not mention your field of research. In some fields, a thesis is a collection of manuscripts that could be published separately in a journal. If you are in one ...


4

Would it look bad on my part if none of the letters I submit are from my advisor? Yes, assuming someone reads your letters. Your advisor should ask people who worked closely with you to help your advisor write the letter so it can include sufficient detail.


4

If I were you, I would not be trying to stick to your principles but ended up on your supervisor's bad side for the rest of the duration of your Ph.D. and beyond. You have to play the long game. Stop obsessing with the authorship of this one or the next couple of papers. Sharing one or two papers with your supervisor is not going to harm you. In fact unless ...


4

"I have another project running outside academia and would rather try my luck in the private sector at that stage in my life. I have thought about this carefully and I will not be considering a PhD right now, but I might consider it in the future. Thank you very much for the opportunity and your support, it is deeply appreciated and I would be happy to keep ...


3

I don't think you have any reason to worry. Under the current strain and disruption of the pandemic people aren't able to do the things they would normally do. A couple of weeks isn't very long after a deadline as there are probably quite a few administrative tasks that seem to them to be more important to them than reassuring students. The professor in ...


3

There shouldn't be any guilt involved since you don't seem to have made any commitment. I think there are some important points to be made in a note totem. Thank you for your interest and support I'm feeling a bit overwhelmed right now and need a bit of time to explore my options and further directions. I'll be more than happy to meet with you ...


3

This is very hard decision to make. I would first talk to my group, let them knom my opinion and how I don't feel like that their path is my path. So i would talk to them like person to person, and listen to what they have to say. For me, this is more ethical, and less serious consequences may appear. After the conversation, I would rethink what to do next.


3

Specific biological domain knowledge will be something that you will learn in the course of doing research, and can be hard to predict at this point in your studies, because you have no idea what kind of graduate program you'll be admitted to or the specific research field of your prospective advisor. Therefore, while all of those directions sound fine and ...


3

It's not clear whether you are still in the same research group. I suspect not, or you would have been aware that another person in the group was doing the work and paper. While it is morally questionable to use someone else's idea without asking them to be involved, there's nothing you can do in the sense of 'getting it fixed'. But it may be worthwhile ...


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