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80 votes
Accepted

PhD supervisor wants to assume my apartment lease and buy my improvements to the apartment when I move out

As long as the sale price is within the commonly paid price range, I see no reason why you shouldn't go through with it. That said, sunlight disinfects! In other words, potential conflicts of interest ...
Wolfgang Bangerth's user avatar
32 votes

My paper has been rejected for accusations of "gift authorship", what now?

Step 1: Investigate the expectations for authorship for the journal you are submitting to. They likely have an explicit guide. If they don't, you might use another journal in the same field that is ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
  • 118k
32 votes

My master's supervisor and paper co-author is not willing to give a letter of recommendation for PhD admissions?

@EthanBolker offers a clever potential solution. Also consider, though, whether there might be someone else who can write you a stronger recommendation. Is there another academic with whom you have ...
Significance's user avatar
  • 6,777
23 votes

My master's supervisor and paper co-author is not willing to give a letter of recommendation for PhD admissions?

On the face of it that is strange. Most academics I know would be willing to write the necessary letters under those circumstances. Submitting one letter to multiple places would not be much more work ...
Ethan Bolker's user avatar
  • 36.3k
22 votes

PhD supervisor wants to assume my apartment lease and buy my improvements to the apartment when I move out

Academia does not have special rules governing the sale of a kitchen to one's advisor. However, the general class of situations in which a professor stands to profit financially from private business ...
Dan Romik's user avatar
  • 191k
21 votes

Will the journal contact my supervisor without me knowing?

To answer your direct question. No your supervisor will not be notified by the journal, this is not how publishing works. However, your supervisor will find out once this gets published. However, this ...
R1NaNo's user avatar
  • 6,302
18 votes
Accepted

Switching advisors after they got a grant

The grant isn't your money to spend and correspondingly isn't your problem to worry about. If they're advising you to consider switching, then it seems unlikely you're going to generate bad blood with ...
user176372's user avatar
  • 1,419
16 votes
Accepted

How to deal with an advisor that refuses to accept my evidence for a negative result?

The first step is for you to take stock of what research you did accomplish so far. Did you gain some new insight into the problem that is of interest to others? Were there any publishable side ...
Arno's user avatar
  • 44.3k
16 votes

Potential PhD advisor may lack qualifications

Mathematician here. Regarding gaps in your knowledge, you should know that most mathematicians feel there are things they wish they understood better. It goes with the job. As you go on, you get lots ...
David White's user avatar
  • 6,197
12 votes
Accepted

I work on a meaningless problem, no idea how to proceed

Not knowing all your circumstances, I am unable to offer advice. But I shall take the liberty of sharing with you the story of my son, to whom a similar thing happened several years ago. My son became ...
Michael_1812's user avatar
  • 4,146
11 votes

My paper has been rejected for accusations of "gift authorship", what now?

Standard procedure in this situation is for the authors to submit a signed authorship form affirming their respective contributions to the paper. There might be such a form on the journal's website. ...
Allure's user avatar
  • 130k
10 votes

My paper has been rejected for accusations of "gift authorship", what now?

My instinct would be to write a letter/email to the relevant editor explaining that for x reason, you did not reconsult with your co-author(s) on the corrections you made, but that, regardless of ...
isolated matrix's user avatar
10 votes
Accepted

How should I discuss the idea of a 6th year with my PhD advisor?

Generally speaking, staying for a sixth year is common during a math PhD. I did so myself. Most advisors would be happier to have you stay an extra year vs. a new first-year PhD student, because of ...
David White's user avatar
  • 6,197
9 votes

Supervisor does not want me to do my own research

If your goal in the PhD is to move on to an academic career, this arrangement is not suitable for you. If your advisor is not supportive of your career goals, they are not suitable for you, either. If ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
  • 118k
9 votes

How to deal with an advisor that refuses to accept my evidence for a negative result?

From a bird's eye view, though I do not know your field: It is frustrating that your advisor is not with you on this. From what you stated, you have negative results, and that should not be a problem....
Caleb Stanford's user avatar
9 votes

I have good results from a project that my advisor told me not to do and refused to help me with. Do I have to make them a co-author?

If he did no work on the paper then he should not be a coauthor. That said, it may not be in your best interest to insist on the ethical course of action. At this point in your career you do not want ...
Ethan Bolker's user avatar
  • 36.3k
8 votes

PhD supervisor wants to assume my apartment lease and buy my improvements to the apartment when I move out

First of all, congrats on the PhD and the new job! This is a very interesting question and one I probably would never have thought about. In math (and probably most fields) the purpose of a PhD is to ...
David White's user avatar
  • 6,197
7 votes

My paper has been rejected for accusations of "gift authorship", what now?

Please take some deep breaths. I know this is a difficult spot, but there is no reason to despair and think you will not be able to complete your PhD. Bear in mind: Your advisors and the rest of the ...
verbose's user avatar
  • 171
7 votes

How to proceed if your post-doc advisor gives you terrible project ideas?

In a comment you state: It's the dynamic issue. At some points, I was proposing ideas, and he started attacking them. After a few months, I stopped giving ideas and "only" implemented his ...
EarlGrey's user avatar
  • 19k
6 votes

I work on a meaningless problem, no idea how to proceed

Treat this situation as an opportunity. It is your PhD and you have to find the way. You're doing it here, so let me give some generic advice, which could be greatly expanded. When I contacted my ...
user1868607's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Will the journal contact my supervisor without me knowing?

Direct answer to the question (and neglecting the advisor-student relationship - for this see R1NaNo's answer): The journal is not likely to contact your supervisor When journals receive papers they ...
Allure's user avatar
  • 130k
5 votes

How to proceed if your post-doc advisor gives you terrible project ideas?

Is your advisor forcing you to work on their ideas? Or are they graciously offering you their ideas since you couldn't come up with any on your own? In the former case, then you probably do want to ...
cag51's user avatar
  • 69.6k
5 votes

My paper has been rejected for accusations of "gift authorship", what now?

Not getting consent of coauthors for the final paper is a serious issue as gift authorship. However, I don't see any gifts here. If everyone had contributed to the paper, past or present, then they ...
Cem Kalyoncu's user avatar
  • 1,215
3 votes

My paper has been rejected for accusations of "gift authorship", what now?

I would just email the Editor and explain the situation in a sentence or two. (1) The gaff of not submitting the revised version of the paper to my coauthors was a beginner's mistake that has been ...
Carl's user avatar
  • 131
3 votes

Whom to ask for a recommendation letter

The professor. A letter from a PhD student carries little weight since PhD students by definition have limited experience supervising research projects (c.f. this question). On the other hand, your ...
cag51's user avatar
  • 69.6k
3 votes

Supervisor does not want me to do my own research

This really sucks and I'm sorry to hear about your situation. As far as I see, the problem is twofold: If you're employed via his grant, technically the work you have to do is pre-specified in the ...
PBee's user avatar
  • 606
3 votes

I have good results from a project that my advisor told me not to do and refused to help me with. Do I have to make them a co-author?

Is it fair to put his name: perhaps not. Can you get away not putting his name? Best way to find out: tell him you want to submit, ask him if he wants to be a co-author. Second best way: send him a ...
fmath's user avatar
  • 147
3 votes

My master's supervisor and paper co-author is not willing to give a letter of recommendation for PhD admissions?

You don’t want a letter from someone less than willing to write one. Could be that she doesn’t think she can write a good one for you, or it’s possible she is totally checked out. Doesn’t matter - if ...
HEITZ's user avatar
  • 10.1k
2 votes

I work on a meaningless problem, no idea how to proceed

Not sure I agree with the above responses. I was in that situation myself. My advice to my younger senf would be find a way to make it work in x amount of time and give it my all. If it truly is not ...
user2822693's user avatar
2 votes

Switching advisors after they got a grant

It is important to understand that the only person you owe anything to is you. Yes, technically, your advisor ... advised you, paid your salary probably, etc. At the end of the day, though, this is ...
FrozenMiddle's user avatar

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