26

It depends on the venue. In a small room, you can easily wander around and get back to your poster quickly if you spot someone interested. In a huge conference hall, if you abandon your poster you may never know who visited it and when. So, if you have a large venue, ask yourself, what is your priority: to get your work out and have a chance of presenting ...


24

Here are some models I am aware of; combinations of these also exist: There is a sponsor (e.g. government, local university or some academic organization) that covers part of the expenses but their rules for sponsoring are such that you cannot make surplus. You will need to return some of the sponsor money back to them so that the bottom line is non-...


21

Bring some post-its and a pen. Stay at your poster for half an hour. If you have people to talk to, continue talking to those people. If time frees itself up, write on a postit that you will be browsing other posters for half an hour, and you will be back for discussion at X o'clock. Other interested people can still look at your poster, and return at that ...


15

Yes. It does count. For example, many meetings have special topic sessions (e.g., SETAC). When people organized these sessions, they are often required to have a number of committed speakers. That being said, here are some caveats: Beware of predator conferences. The value of being invited to a special session is different than being invited as a plenary ...


12

Someone should probably stay by your poster throughout. If there is no one there it won't generate much of any interest. Posters are seldom so self explanatory that people will gain much without a bit of help. Perhaps a colleague or even your professor would be willing to help you out for a portion of the time required. But it should be someone who can ...


9

If you want to submit elsewhere, the proper course is to formally withdraw your paper. Send a note to the editor. Then you are free to submit elsewhere. Don't make assumptions.


8

I suspect that the form was intended for academic researchers who are funded in the form of industry grants. In that case, the size of the grant would be the right number. In your case, I would leave it open -- nobody needs to know your salary.


6

It definitely sucks when you feel like you're not getting credit for your work, and in applied math, it is certainly not standard practice to omit mention of PhD students' contributions. In fact, I've seen many presentations where professors and industry leaders show group pictures of their entire lab, and they're proud of the team effort. However, passive ...


5

For the following I assume a conference with at most a few hundred participants that is well organised, i.e., early poster session(s), and posters can stay on display for the entire conference. In my experience, there are basically two kinds of “customers” you can attract with a poster, with little middle ground in between: People for whom skimming your ...


5

"The conference language is native language, but english contributions are welcome as well. The conference organizers have made it clear that both native language and English are acceptable and welcome for your conference materials. That means it’s entirely up to you. If you have strong feelings about supporting your local language, you can feel ...


4

In many (most?) fields, conferences have sponsors. In my field (CS) a typical sponsor might be the ACM (Association for Computing Machinery) or one of its parts. Any surplus would go back to the sponsor. But the sponsor is also responsible for any shortfalls that occur. I've never been a conference chair (only lower level positions) and never the Finance ...


3

Invited presentations, where you're only formally invited, became quite usual these days. Being invited then merely means that you get more time to present your stuff. Sometimes the conference fee is waived when you ask for it. Often the organizers rely on the registration fees to break even. Independent of paying the fee or not, it is usual to ask invited ...


3

Many conferences specifically state that The Language of the Conference is X for some suitable choice of X. If so, then use that language. Here, they state that the native language is preferred, so use that. But, if this conference is in Germany you can be pretty much assured that every academic, and many other people, will understand English. This is true ...


3

Can I submit my paper somewhere else during rebuttal period? No: Your paper is under review, submitting elsewhere would be a parallel submission. You could withdraw your paper and then submit elsewhere. Albeit, withdrawal seems unethical at this late stage.


2

Split the time allocated to the poster session 50/50. If your poster designation is odd be at your poster for the first half of the session. If it’s even, then the second half. Use the other half to look at other posters. If the conference organizers are really on top of things, they may already have some system like this setup, in which case follow ...


2

CS/AI perspective: the name on the presentation matters far less than the name on the paper. You are listed as a coauthor on a paper less than 6 months into your PhD, that's a big deal I think. In other words - while not being mentioned during the presentation is annoying and hurtful, I don't think it actually hurts you as much as you think it does. That ...


2

In most experimental fields (to which I would definitely slot medicine), it's rather common to present results more than once at conferences. The obvious reasons for doing this are that different conferences hit different audiences. Also, that the researcher may be going to the conference to hear other talks, or even enjoy some travel (do not bind the ...


2

I would say Yes, depending; Is it an interesting new type of vulnerability? Did you use an interesting new method to find it? Do you have interesting new insights about this kind of (already known) vulnerability, perhaps linking it to a different concept? Can you take the actions you took to find specific vulnerabilities in specific cases, and generalize ...


2

First of all, congrats on being invited to speak! Would it be possible for you to give a broad review of the state of the field in your talk? This should perhaps be run by the conference organizers who invited you, to see if this is something they would be interested in. But your comment about: The theme is exactly related on my doctoral work, and they ...


1

Ask one of your professors who attends the conference about this. Ask what you could gain. If the prof is actually going, maybe they could shepherd you around so that you could meet people. I don't know about the conference, but see if they have things for students, especially such things as a doctoral symposium where you can hear about student work in ...


1

Don't mix up publishing in a journal to everybody and presenting results on a conference to a limited audience, you have to spread your results on conferences as far as possible. That's in your and the public interest. And on conferences you might easily get more interdisciplinary attention from other scientific branches than in a very specific field-...


1

Presumably this is mathematics or something similar. In that case, having completely different proofs is, in fact, sufficiently novel. The same might be true for other fields as well. Evaluate the paper independently, based on its merits, but mention the other work to the editor and to the authors. In many fields, the techniques of proof are actually ...


1

Based on the information you provide I would recommend acceptance. The result may not be new (but only by a short time lag), but the other papers authors are OK with the coincidence. The result is interesting (else you would not clearly accept on its own) so it's good to have two different proofs. Your response to the editor can include your argument for ...


1

I think you should first meet your advisor,and maybe in second time the other colleague. I would not tell him directly the problem but instead asking a question like "I don't get why I am not mentioned for this work. Is it usual ? Didn't I work enough on the problem ?". And if his answer does not convince you, request that your name appears everytime needed ...


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