91

Let's see: You wrote a paper of sufficient writing quality that it was chosen for presentation at a conference and publication. None of the peer reviewers noticed anything wrong with it. None of the people in the audience questioned it. Your supervisor saw nothing wrong with it. You gave an excellent presentation. You found a flaw in a paper that had ...


37

I do not know which AC manages my submission. All I can do is to contact PC. Therefore... Should I contact PC about this before submitting my rebuttal Yes, or more broadly: use whatever contact information you have for the organizers. There is no point in rebutting an editorial mistake.


36

Relax. You're not the first person to make a mistake, and people are not likely to know that you had been celebrating (besides, even if you were ... so what?). The fact that you found the error yourself is furthermore a good sign, since it means you're taking your work seriously and subjecting it to the scrutiny it deserves. Take a look at this. The first ...


19

Sadly, what the university should do, what it can do, and what it is willing to do might all be different. In a perfect world, yes, they should fund you. However, there may be limited funds or even regulations that bind their decision. Also, your relationship with the supervisor might be an issue if they don't think that this is worthwhile for you or them. ...


18

My advisor told me that if I contact PC for this reason, it might be interference. Your advisor is mistaken. If you had contacted the Program Committee chair trying to influence the refereeing process - yes, that would have been inappropriate. But it is actually very common for authors to contact PC chairs, for a variety of reason: Problems with the paper ...


15

The best way is just to be direct, though you may need to reveal a bit about the reasons. Explain the situation much as you have here. I think most conferences would try to accommodate you, but it might not work out in every situation, due to numbers and money. But do this immediately, so that it doesn't require reassignment of rooms, etc. Alternatively, ...


12

There is one other thing you can consider doing, after getting agreement from the conference committee. You can put a note in the paper for publication, noting that you have found a serious error and explaining the nature of the error. Don't bother with apologies and such, but just point out where the paper is wrong. This assumes, of course, that you don'...


8

Specific rules for specific purses Most sources of money that could be (or are) used for funding travel have some specific conditions attached. For example, most of my travel is supported by research grants which have allocated funding to publish and present results of that research project - and for eligibility it does not matter if the goal of some travel ...


7

Your list of accomplishments is still very impressive, and I would moreover add that this is extremely common, even for very established researchers. I don't know your field, but in computer science my empirical belief is that the majority of papers contain mistakes; usually minor and hopefully simple fixes, sometimes more major fixes that don't invalidate ...


4

You are overthinking it. A simple note is all you really need. "The paper needs to be withdrawn as we have found a serious error that we don't believe can be corrected in time for the conference." This won't have been the first time that a paper has been withdrawn. It is a matter of scheduling sessions for the program committee but some of the members are ...


3

If the conference uses the Easychair system for organizing the reviewing process for conferences, then you can check if you can still upload an updated version. This often works, as many conference organizers choose to manually disable the submission of updated versions after the deadline has passed. So if Easychair allows you to still upload an updated ...


3

You've actually asked a very relevant question. Simplification and standardisation is indeed what everyone wants, but when the Asch effect tends to institutionalise everyone into a state of learned helplessness, the prevalent opinion will tend to stick to tradition. Moreover, we have a mandatory xkcd for standardisation. To answer your question, some of ...


3

Others told you already that it is not uncommon to have mistakes or errors in papers. I go a step further: consider that scientific work means being right at the edge of what is currently known. Honest mistakes will happen every so often, and maybe more often in science as a consequence of venturing into the unknown*, and without any particular fault of ...


3

I agree with the other answers, but think that it's worth considering what it's worth to have your contribution out there for others to benefit from--the whole point is to make each other smarter! As perhaps an extreme example, if this were medicine, and your imperfect paper could jump start others in saving lives, then surely it would be moral to make the ...


3

Depends on the conference. Small conferences often accept most of things, at least to the poster stage. In some fields, a conference is a place for researchers to meet, so conference papers have little significance. In others, conference papers are almost as important as journal papers and its really hard to get an abstract in. Check ICCV acceptance rates....


2

Major physics conferences do not screen abstracts. Abstracts that are nonsensical are routinely accepted at certain very big conferences. Small conferences may vary. Physics conferences do not permit revision of abstracts.


2

You should ask the organization specifically what is appropriate. It might be fine, but I know of other such international collaborations in which it is specifically forbidden to claim authorship. The work is attributed to the committee as a whole, by name. An additional reason for not doing this is the question as to whether it is a creative work on your ...


2

Why would you not add it? Second author is still author, not non-author. Add it. It will speak for itself. If these are your most important accomplishments then you have a way to go, but, even for a distinguished academic, the CV should be complete. The significance may be small, but not nothing.


1

Workshops are usually for new topics, and I do rank them lower than conferences. Moreover, workshops usually publish/accept papers rejected from their co-located main conference; often than not, they are used to prop up the number of registrations or to cover the cost of the main conference. Also, because they are new, it is usually very easy to get a paper ...


1

For some conferences the Program Chair might respond to an email enquiry. In others, perhaps not. But there is no reason that you can't just submit your paper. If it is inappropriate in any way, you will be told as part of the review process. Don't waste people's time with something obviously off-topic, but otherwise just do it. If a PC does respond to ...


1

If the sponsoring organization, say ACM, is wise then it will seek a mix of experience and fresh faces on the overall conference committee and subcommittees. This assumes that the conference is part of a continuing series, such as SIGPlan. The conference chair is generally very experienced and has a wide circle of collaborators, many of which are friends. ...


1

They are selected by the conference chair to be on the technical program committee. People on the technical committee may suggest other people. Some times they will ask past authors of the conference to be on the committee.


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