New answers tagged

0

Scientific American is a very different type of journal, in fact it more a "magazine" than a peer-reviewed academic journal like Nature. Nature (and almost all other paid-subscription academic journals) does not want people downloading large numbers of articles at a time, even if they are doing it legally (with a paid subscription, such as yourself). This ...


0

In addition to SciRev, the review site already mentioned in previous answers, there is the Humanities Journal Wiki. SciRev is broader in scope, and while it does contain entries for humanities journals, the site seems to concentrate on the sciences. SciRev is also highly structured: users wishing to review a journal fill out largely quantitative ...


3

I don't know to what extent the journal has recovered its reputation (I was aware of the controversy, but it's not remotely in my area). However, a good place to look is the Scimago journal rankings, which gives you quite a lot of information. In particular, looking at the graph of "cites per doc" vs "external cites", you can see that the steep rise in ...


0

Of course there are abundant megajournals with no specific requirements on what kind of paper get published other than technical accuracy (like PLoS ONE and Sci. Rep.), but I guess the bigger question is why do you think this is appropriate for a journal in the first place? Or why is it important to you to publish there? Despite the explosion in new ...


2

Check the journal's past issues, which will usually come with a page that says who the editorial board members are. If you can't find it online, get it from a print copy.


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I have absolutely no idea about the journal in question, so I will provide a more general answer on how to guide the issue. I agree with the comment by @Dave L Renfro. You are a co-author, which means that you need to agree with the choice of journals. No matter how experienced the advisor is, and regardless of being correct (he may be perfectly right!), he ...


29

Why not? A quick look at the controversy indicates that the disagreements were entirely around the editor-in-chief publishing his own papers in the journal, papers which were lightly reviewed + indulged in a lot of self-citation. This means: It's only the editor-in-chief's papers that are affected; none of the papers by other authors published in the ...


2

There are of course pros and cons and various personal preferences, but here is what I would do based on my experience as both author and reviewer: It is probably relevant for the reviewers to be able to see your code and data. Whether they actually take the opportunity to examine it more closely is up to the journal's policy and probably the reviewers' ...


0

You should not be able to access Impact Factors on a large scale from anywhere beyond Clarivate Analytics' (commercial) Journal Citation Reports (JCR) and InCites. The reason is stated in the Terms of Use for Clarivate Analytics' products, and for InCites specifically. For instance, the product terms for InCites (as of May 2020) states that: (b) Extracts....


1

You could ask for the "acceptance chance", but what do you expect them to say? The editors don't know either - without the reviewer reports they can't give you an estimate, or if they do it's likely to be wildly inaccurate. You're probably better off requesting they hurry up [because you are applying for jobs and you need the results urgently, etc].


0

If you did not let the editor know about your “special circumstances” in the earlier email, then I think it is okay to email again to inform them and ask if the process can be expedited at all. This is not uncommon when someone is coming up on a tenure decision, for instance. Editors can push a bit harder to get information back from referees when the ...


1

I don't think the editor could confirm the acceptance chance without communicating with the referee. Perhaps you could ask the editor to expedite the process by asking the referee to cut short the report and submit it immediately if it's going to be negative. You might not wish to do this if you want a more thorough report in the case of rejection. You ...


1

Based on some comments, I think providing some insight from Economics, Business and Finance (not my areas but I am familiar with their practices), where submission fees have become prevalent. This is the expansion of a comment I left in the first answer, and perhaps selfishly I would not want it to get lost. A reliable but not exclusive guide for ...


2

Ultimately, it's up to you. I do not really see a reason to keep your data and code private, but you may very well have a valid reason to do so. Hence, I cannot answer the question what you should do. If I were in your position, I would do the following. I would include a link in the manuscript to the data and code, and write that at this link you make the ...


0

I do not see a problem with keeping the same name. Often there are multiple versions of a piece of work: early drafts, working papers, submission drafts, conference versions, publications etc. A change of name is necessary if an additional element is explored in the paper. The suggestion to double-check with the editor is good, but I believe they will not ...


1

The waiting time for a review comprises of: The reviewer taking care of more urgent/important tasks in their job as a researcher. The reviewer doing the actual review. Since almost everything takes precedence over reviewing, the first part usually takes up most of the time. On the other hand, it is highly variable by nature and it may as well be non ...


1

Usually, there is no formal requirement that the title has to be changed. In fact, if the journal paper is just the long version of the conference paper, I would recommend not to change it, so that the connection between the two papers is obvious to people who see the paper in a list of references. As soon as the journal version of the paper has appeared, ...


1

A rapid "accept" recommendation with nothing else might seem unusual (but not always, e.g. if the paper is very short, or the work is in your particular area of expertise). But a week is not rapid, if you happen to immediately have spare time. Regardless of anything else, I advise giving concrete reasons for your recommendation. I suggest including a ...


1

Once your report is detailed and accurate, with substantive and balanced comments, submit it, irrespective of how quick the turnaround is.


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There's no drawback (from the editor's/author's point of view) to you submitting a quick review, but you should mention to the editor that you've already seen the paper before. It can be suspicious as a case of the author reviewing his/her own paper: The reviews themselves were not remarkable: mostly favourable, with some suggestions about how to improve ...


10

Statistical outliers always attract attention. a) Your speed will be judged against the content and professionalism of your report: Were you speedy or just in a hurry to finish with the damn thing? b) Even if your speed is not useful to the Editor (because, maybe, there is a second referee, so what will matter for the publication process is the lowest ...


84

Fast is great! Just be warned that it means editors will like you and send you more requests so you’ll have to learn to say no. If you also say “no” quickly and suggest alternatives, then you’ll still leave a good impression with the editors.


1

Notes and Queries is listed in Web of Science's Arts & Humanities Citation Index (AHCI). This fact indicates that the journal's "primary research articles must be subject to external peer review" (according to Web of Science's evaluation criteria). As Web of Science regularly evaluates its journals, one can probably trust that Notes and Queries indeed ...


4

Having just had a piece accepted for publication in the journal, albeit without having received copies or even mention of any reviews, I decided to ask the editorial assistant, Alicia Black, whether submissions to Notes and Queries undergo peer review. This is her response in full: N&Q is a peer reviewed journal. Your Query has been reviewed, though ...


1

You don't indicate which submission system you are speaking of, but the ScholarOne Manuscripts system, there are generally 3 levels of roles that deal with a submission. There is the administrator, who would preform some of the more routine tasks (checklists, adding notes, etc), this is commonly abbreviated as "admin" or "adm". The next level is an Editor. ...


0

IEEE support mentioned that the paper can be uploaded to arXiv even after submitting to IEEE as long as this information is added to the first page of the article: “© 20XX IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other uses, in any current or future media, including reprinting/republishing this ...


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The EU-backed FREYA is currently working on a project called 'common DOI search' to address this issue.


2

DOIs are registered and managed by Registration Agencies appointed by the International DOI Foundation. All registered DOI numbers resolve through https://doi.org/ - if it doesn't resolve it's not a DOI. A DOI can be applied to many different things so the fact that content has a DOI doesn't say anything about the quality or validity of the content. There's ...


0

Attempt to resolve the DOI digitally. If the number doesn’t resolve then it doesn’t currently identify a digital object adequately. Do you mean “how do I identify DOIs resolving to objects that are academic garbage, lack peer review or a publisher exhibiting academic standards of review prior to publication?”


-1

"Doctoral researcher" is another good option, and I have not seen anyone object to that. On the other hand, "PhD student/ candidate" may cause some eybrows to be raised (unfairly).


4

It doesn't matter, it's a bio. Describe who you are. Do you see yourself as a PhD student or a researcher? Be careful because "PhD candidate" has additional meaning some places vs others, and you don't want to misuse it if it doesn't apply to you (it does not mean "PhD student" everywhere).


4

Breadth Even if you specific algorithm has not been discussed, you should point the readers to related algorithms (maybe in other contexts), or to others algorithms that solve the same problem. Language The response has a weird focus on English-language references. If you have a comprehensive set of references that are not in English, you might want to ...


22

tl;dr: Your editor is right: a limited bibliography reflects poor quality of the literature review. Improve your manuscript by finding relevant work of others and comparing your results with them. Even if your algorithm is completely new — and this is a big if, because most new algorithms are actually variations and combinations of previously known ...


2

Using Sci Hub can also be like reading books in a library without borrowing them: 1) Is it operating as the library intended? No and yes. 2) I agree that it's arguably less ethically wrong than outright stealing. After reading copious articles on a subject, I can then decide which articles I want to cite/include/research further. Impossible to gain such ...


35

Often, most of the citations in a paper are not work that you directly rely on. Of course you cite a paper if you use their model, their method, or if your model or method or algorithm is a direct extension of theirs. But you also cite papers of people you solved (or attacked) similar problems or used related methods. You discuss what they have done and ...


46

the editors reject it on the basis of size of the reference list rather than focussing on the quality of the manuscript. I think that's a false distinction. From the view of the journal (and most publication outlets I know), one aspect of a manuscript's quality is that it needs to defend its novelty by appropriately considering related work. The feedback ...


-1

If the Idiot Reviewers misunderstand your work, that is prima facie evidence that your work can be misunderstood. Revise it.


3

To me there are two important criteria: Did the main author send their angry email while giving the impression that they were speaking in your name too, or only in their own name? (e.g., do they say "I" or "We"? do they sign with their own name only, or also yours?) How bad was their email? i.e., is it just some understandable or reasonable disagreement ...


5

If a referee did not understand your paper, it indicates that it was not written clearly (this is the mindset you should take, especially if you want later people who read it to understand it) Worst thing what can happen is that this criticism is forwarded to the referees. I know some researchers in higher position who are vengeful. These people decide who ...


2

Editors have better things to do than sue over angry rebuttals. After all, he or she can simply decide not to publish the paper and that’s punishment enough. The editor sent the paper to referees, who also function typical readers with (presumably) an interest in the topic else the referees would have declined. It is unlikely that all referees were not ...


49

What do editors do when authors send them angry emails questioning the competence of the reviewer? When I edited a journal, if the author provided technical arguments against the reviewer's comments, I would forward those to the reviewer(s) and see what they say. If they didn't, I would usually say something generic about our faith in our peer review process ...


1

The ScholarOne platform is very capable of allowing a user to have a single login across all journals. Unfortunately, each journal (or in some cases publishers) has required their user accounts to not be shared with other journals or publishers. @aeismail answer pretty much sums up the reason (its not impossible however). At ScholarOne, we realize this is ...


6

Do you think that the journal, following this email, can do something to the authors of the paper? Like e.g., sue us? Sue you for having had a research colleague privately express the view that someone is unqualified for a piece of work they did? No, of course not. ....or ban us to publish there? Yes, they could do this. ...or stuff like this? ...


10

Papers get rejected. It happens. Sometimes they get rejected for good reasons. Sometimes they get rejected for bad reasons. Sometimes they get rejected for a mix of reasons. And, yes, when there's a not great referee's report, appealing to the editor is an option, but it rarely works. The best course of action is generally to take the useful critical ...


0

I’ve seen worse situations than this, where an undergraduate or laboratory technician deserves to be first author and ends up with no credit at all, or just a “thanks to” credit at the end of the paper. Is this fair or ethical? Of course not — welcome to the real world of academia! I strongly urge you to grit your teeth, profusely thank your mentor, ...


4

Mathematics and Biology have polar opposite cultures, and much of this is due to what's practical. Some of the top Biology journals receive tens of thousands of manuscript submissions each year. For example, Nature receives 200+ manuscripts each week. They send maybe 30 or so of those out for peer-review. They can't read 200 papers in a week, and likely ...


1

I would not like to comment on whether the "mentor" (it is unclear to me what the term means in practice) is correct on undegraduate authorship and focus on whether there are potential grounds for him/ her to claim first authorship. The OP states that (1) she "did everything except the statistics, because by the rules, the mentor must to it" and (2) "The ...


2

Anyone can publish if they submit a manuscript that is otherwise acceptable to a journal. I know a case where a high school student (not 100% sure, but I remember I was surprised to find that out a while ago) published in a major journal as the first author with several coauthors, after an internship at a laboratory. When you submit a manuscript, you have ...


11

Update: She has revealed in the comments that the "mentor" is a Professor at the Docent level, which makes me more inclined to advise her to take advice from the mentor. "Mentor" on its own sounds like it could be a grad student, in which case the answer would be different. Furthermore the Professor is suggesting more co-authors to save costs on publication, ...


0

This's a common status for Taylor and Francis publisher. Your manuscript requires some changes in its body style before sending for the peer-reviewing process. Recheck your style and bibliography format to finalize your submission.


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