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2

It means they're inviting you to review the revision. If you accept the review, then you get to read the paper, make new comments, make new recommendation, etc. If you decline, they'll either find someone else or make a decision. Based on your description, there isn't enough information to tell if there are other reviewers invited. You certainly are, but ...


2

Depends on journal policies. The one I'm most familiar with, the "ahead of print" articles are complete in every way except they've not been assigned to a volume & issue. If this is the case for you then of course they will send proofs to the author before putting it there. Alternatively they can put the accepted manuscript there. If this is the case it ...


0

The American Mathematical Society provides regular (annual, I believe) on journal backlog times. The latest can be found here: https://www.ams.org/journals/notices/201910/rnoti-p1713.pdf Depending on your subfield it may not contain data on all relevant journals, but it is quite comprehensive. The reports are published in the November issue of the Notices of ...


0

A general source for many, many domains beyond just mathematics is SciRev, a site where authors submit reviews of their experience with the peer-review process at many (hundreds or thousands?) of journals across many disciplines. If you click on the "All reviews" tab, you can then search for journals by name or discipline; it includes many subfields of ...


2

Several reputable journals I am familiar with ask authors to submit cover images. Once they receive the cover images, they ask the authors to pay a fee for the image to appear on the cover. For people who know about this process, awareness that the authors may have paid a fee to appear on the cover decreases the prestige of appearing on the cover. People ...


0

I think that the researchers who published their work in a sci journal say that the scie journals are of low standards. As they have pulished in sci so sci is superior to scie. But most of the phd scholars says them same with a difference related to media.


0

Not just a mere Web of Science indexing. Within Web of Science, there are subgroups and it should be under SSCI or SCI or SCIE, inorder to have an Impact factor score. For example, journals indexed in Web of Science, but under ESCI group, do not have an impact factor score.


55

Yes, it is a plus, and yes, you can add it to your CV. But it is (and should be) just one thing among many. It, alone, won't get you a job or a promotion, but it adds to the list of things that are positive about your contributions. The academic value will be positive, but small. The paper is more important, of course. The image might induce a few more ...


2

A special issue editor would normally be referred to as a guest editor. Most likely the “normal” editor suddenly resigned or otherwise cannot continue her or his duties for a while, and someone stepped in until a permanent editor is found or the regular editor returns.


2

Here are some charges for physics journals. Note: dated 2014


2

They share the same street address and web styling as another similar magazine, Research Outreach: https://researchoutreach.org/our-company/ Same people, same idea, similar content (though I have not checked for overlaps). I might give this one a miss.


3

Another field-specific answer: Most conferences and journals don't send out invitations by email. Many conferences distribute call-for-papers posters, which get put up on boards you might see at your university/institute, or on people's doors, or even in another conference. A few journals also have CFP posters. A few conferences - more industry-oriented ...


1

In case of doubt, I write a short reply asking if there is a conference website, travel is covered, etc. Usually, I can tell if it is spam or not from the answer. Some companies organizing spam conferences appear on black lists, so you can google for them.


1

Keep in mind that many faculty members (like myself) are still on Holiday Break and may not be checking e-mail as often as they would if the semester was in session. That being said: I would wait until January 21st (which is typically the latest date for a semester to start) and reach out to the editor again (politely, of course). If you still do not hear ...


1

Depending on the field, their may be a pre-print server available where authors upload their papers before submission. Authors will usually upload a copy either before the refereeing process starts or a final copy, with the changes made during the referee process but without the journal's final formatting. So they can be as good as the final version from a ...


3

This is likely field specific, but no legitimate conferences/journals reach out to specific faculty members in my field. All of the legitimate conferences/journals put out the call for papers in typical fashion. However, it isn't unusual or the editor of a journal to talk to somebody personally at a conference and ask about the repurposing of a ...


12

I am from a mathematical background, so I hope this information is not too field specific but in my experience legit conference invitations travel exclusively through personal connections. So the decision on whether something is legit is very simple: Was is sent to you by someone whose name you recognize as being a researcher in your field? This went so ...


38

The #1 criterion is: they come from someone whose name you recognize as a respected colleague in the field. Or, at least, a conference or a journal that you know already. The #2 criterion is: they look like they are not written automatically. Compare Dear Arthur, I have seen your very interesting article on shiny rocks and I would like to invite you... ...


4

Getting no response to status inquiries at all is not normal. Make sure you're contacting the right editor. Unless the journal is dead (i.e. no new papers accepted and published), someone out there is organizing peer review. That someone should be able to answer your question. However if you're writing to the wrong email address which might not even work ...


2

Withdraw. That is far too long especially given lack of any communication as well as fact that journal isn’t even quite the right fit. But you need to get it withdrawn. Have you contacted the general editor? Time to escalate.


1

The other answers give proper solutions to the questions the OP asks. Here is a suggestion to avoid the problem altogether. Publish the full paper on arXiv, or as a technical report from your own university. Then publish an abbreviated version in the journal, and make crossreferences. Before you do this, carefully doublecheck the journal's policies on ...


0

Having published a few things with Elsevier journals I can tell you that you often need to suggest reviewers. Your supervisor is the big cheese, so he gets put on that list. Don't be upset about the authorship, some journals make you describe contributions to stop this, but it is very common practice, and there are comics about how much work different ...


2

Others have given good advice regarding how you should respond to the review. But to add a little regarding your concerns: I don’t understand why the journal contacted him and not me to review that paper though I was the corresponding author? I feel very bad that even though it was my work the journals did not send me the paper for review. What do ...


-1

TL;DR: Doing the review for your supervisor is as mandatory as making him an author of your paper. For the editor, it practically matters only that your supervisor commands the expertise required for the review. This is kind of circular, but let’s start here: My advisor had almost no contribution in the paper, but since it is mandatory to put the advisor’...


3

I would suggest to review the paper, it's a very good experience. Tell your supervisor to warn the journal editor that he refused to review the paper and you will do the work.


37

One way to resolve this would be that your advisor refused to review the manuscript and suggests you as a possible reviewer. Then the editor can decide what to do. Do not overthink why your advisor was chosen first. He has been around for a longer time and is therefore more known to editors. I would prefer this procedure to a simple 'yes' to the request (...


5

Normally the answer to such requests is yes. It is good experience. But the review may wind up being in the name of the advisor. He was contacted as a more senior academic, I think, and the editor didn't know of his lack of specific knowledge. However, since the work is related to your own, it might be worth letting the editor know, directly or, preferably,...


3

Many think it is unethical to have your coauthor to review the paper; many think it is not. Many journals and associations have strict guidelines on this matter; I suggest you to take a look at the answers to Conflict of interest as a referee, especially @DavidRicherby's one, and possibly also to other questions with the tag conflict-of-interest. In any ...


0

I assume you mean a formal co-author. Someone listed on the paper itself. It isn't unethical to nominate them, but I don't think any editor would go along with it. They want an independent analysis. So, I think you would be wasting an opportunity by naming a co-author. It would probably generate a laugh at the editorial office. But if you are speaking ...


0

As always there’s a 1000 combinations of situations where this can arise. Let’s assume as stated there is a surplus of submissions. One scenario would be the editor cannot so easily find a referee from the usual pool - the usual referees are busy with other papers - so the editor contacts someone who agrees only to write back to the editor after 3 weeks ...


3

Educated guess of what happened: they invited reviewers (which automatically updates the status even if the reviewers don't agree to review). Some/many of the reviewers then declined to review, giving reasons that made the editor decide to desk reject your paper. I'm not a mathematician, but from what I've heard, 4.5 months is not a particularly long wait ...


1

In general you publish in the most prestigious journal that will accept your work. There are reasons for this: more prestigious journals tend to be more visible (more readers), more impressive (helps with graduate admissions), or are even tracked by promotion committees ("to be promoted to [role], you need to publish [number] articles in SCI-indexed journals"...


0

It is generally considered a journal that accepts research papers that are then sent by editor to two experts in your field to be peer reviewed and accepted or rejected by the editor. It is difficult to advise you with out further information: where is the institution you are associated with, your academic achievements and future plans. Normally you would ...


1

I'm guessing that where you are in your career it matters very little. The important thing is to get published in a reputable journal. I also doubt that experienced scholars worry very little about such things. Pick a journal that seems appropriate for your work. Send it off. Then write the next paper. And if you are not yet in a doctoral program, then ...


3

Think of being a PhD student as a job. If you think there’s another job you’d prefer, then switch jobs. It’s no more of a waste than spending two years at another job that you end up leaving. That said if you already have some substantial work finished you might ask your advisor if you can just graduate this year with a weak thesis.


1

Just because you did not complete is not a guarantee that 2 years were wasted - those job offers are probably based on that very experience. Who knows, you may be able to put the Phd on hold, do some work and then come back and finish it. Even changing institution could be the game changer as mentioned in the other answer.


0

Since you don't list any positive aspects for continuing, I suspect that you have already made up your mind. However, it would be worth listing all of the positives and negatives so you have a balanced view. Try to weight the importance of each factor, both positive and negative. But, if you and your partner are probably moving, perhaps you can continue ...


3

I think the best course is just to wait for the reviewer reports. Probably they will suggest some changes. Make additional changes at that time and submit them with the revised manuscript. Otherwise it will just be confusing, even chaotic, for the editor and reviewers. Let the process run for a bit. I'm assuming that the changes you want to make wouldn't ...


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