New answers tagged

3

This should be fine in almost all cases. It is probably important that you, separately, list your university as your "affiliation" since they have in some ways at least provided support. Using a personal email does, of course, give you some responsibility for maintaining that, so a company that can be expected to have a long life (Google...?) ...


4

Use a long-term, personal email address, rather than a short-term institutional address. This will not cause problems, it is common, and, as you've noted, it's better, because institutional email addresses expire.


1

The last time I handled a journal which had a standard review deadline of ~28 days, I had a personal limit of once every two months. It's not a strict rule, and if e.g. a paper is revised within two months I will still invite the same reviewer. This limit is also not based on any statistics or data - it's simply something I intuited. It was also rather rare ...


1

From the editor office, Is the 8-page limit with or without the references and biography section? The page limit includes the references. The biography section is not required. Is it possible to include supplementary materials in the paper? If yes, will it be considered in the page limit? It is possible. However supplementary material is added at the end of ...


8

From my experience as an editor, it is not unusual for referees to ask for "time off" from being assigned reviews and give bounds for the frequency of requests. As Buffy suggested, some editorial systems allow referees to enter this information and the editor sees it before sending out review invitations. I was glad to honor such requests from ...


4

Even for reviewers I know well (and probably have worked with), I will try not to ask the same person to review journal submissions more often than every 4-6 months. I certainly wouldn't say "good job on that last one, here's the next one for you!" But it all comes down to how people respond. If someone declines, I'm more likely to wait a long ...


4

An editor should and normally does keep a database of reviewers. It contains more than just their email addresses. There is no particular reason why it can't contain preferences for frequency as well as the other information. So, an editor can and should ask, and try (hard) to honor those requests. Then the frequency is determined individually and need not ...


6

I'm not an editor, so I don't have the first-hand perspective you're asking for. Anyway, according to Publon's Global State of Peer Review 2018 report, ~10% of reviewers are responsible for ~50% of peer reviews (Nature News summary, full report), so some reviewers probably do get "milked". The report also discusses if there's a rising "...


3

Speaking from the perspective of a roboticist with publications in the conferences you listed and in Science: Hiring for industry jobs (especially at junior levels) is going to be focused on finding employees who can use and modify existing robotics paradigms to achieve company goals. Conference papers (especially at the venues you name) provide useful ...


6

It depends on what field you are in and the types of jobs you are looking at. In computer science, conferences are typically valued more than journals, although this doesn't necessarily mean the quality of the papers at conferences are better than journals. A popular computer science department ranking site, CSRankings, does their rankings by top conferences,...


4

Just ask for an update and an estimate of when it might appear. There isn't any special form for that. But "future issue" is pretty nebulous. For a print journal there are issues of finding a proper "fit" for the paper depending on the topic and even the page length. And yes, you should answer emails. You've been assuming what they should ...


1

Yes, use again the same superscript as before. Here is a random example from JAMA Network Open (this paper at p. 5). Note the repeated use of 1 or 24:


2

If you’re asking about publishing a paper using papers downloaded illegally, it’s nearly impossible for anyone who reviews your work to know whether the papers were illicitly obtained. It’s not illegal (the cops won’t come after you), but conducting research using illegal sources almost certainly violates your university’s code of conduct. If you’re ...


2

I think you need to consult a lawyer for this, but it isn't the publishing that is illegal, per se. How you acquired certain information might have legal implications, and how you quote and cite might have ethical implications, of course. But both of those are independent of publishing. Republishing copyright material is illegal in a lot of places, but I don'...


2

Yes, they are still in print. The issues through 2019 can be found here.


0

Probably the best way of identifying non-predatory journals is to look at where well-known scholars in your field publish. If the top scholars are publishing in a journal, then at least some papers in that journal are probably worth reading, both to you and others. Then if you publish in that journal, at least other scholars are likely to read it.


2

Duplicate data is mostly a problem when the data are experimental/real-world data and where repeating an analysis with the same data makes the overall literature seem to support a conclusion more strongly than it would if it were presented only once. Let's say you have an experiment showing that green jelly beans cause acne. You publish it once, but people ...


0

Whether a journal is a predatory journal should not be defined based on personal opinions. The quality of a journal should be defined in terms of the quality of the articles published, the review process, the reviewer's suggestions, and the article publication process.


4

Especially at your early point in life, I think your label of what you want probably is not what you really-really want, if the meaning and entailments of labels were clearer. That is, surely a mathematician's idealistic goal is to "understand/discover cool things". Not clear that fame and fortune follow... Not clear what the prerequisites might be,...


0

Does this count as an IEEE Conference paper? Yes! Can I safely assume that all papers available on IEEE Xplore or ACM Digital Library are published as IEEE transaction or conference papers, and ACM papers respectively? Not all papers available on IEEE Xplore are transaction papers. Transaction papers are only "transaction papers" and not ...


1

You can safely assume that. Since these are specific to the publishing body itself. For instance: ScienceDirect for Elsevier, ACM Digital Library for ACM Journals, IEEE Xplore for IEEE related journals and conferences/proceedings, Springerlink for Springer Journals and Conferences/proceedings etc


8

This is something that varies with every individual. The best advice is to first get a broad mathematical education and then focus on some area of interest. But along the way to that broad education, seek insight into why things work as they do, not just the computational skill that you normally get in something like Calc 2. Some people are able to publish ...


2

Does this count as an IEEE Conference paper? Yes Can I safely assume that all papers available on IEEE Xplore or ACM Digital Library are published as IEEE transaction or conference papers, and ACM papers respectively? I think so and will be surprised if that is not the case.


4

There are a number of explanations, but the most likely two are carelessness or a non-native English speaker who is assistant to the editor. In a lot of places like, for example, NYC the workforce is composed of people from many lands. And some high end journals may have a widely distributed (world wide) staff. So, some awkwardness with the language can be ...


14

You should post it before the paper is sent for review. Your paper is already on arXiv, and you do plan to make the code public after publication, so I see little reason to be secretive with it just for the duration of the review. With certain types of papers, the review can be much more productive (and also easier for the reviewer) if the reviewer has ...


33

Particular to your situation, I think the exact answer is highly dependent on some missing information: How do you plan to license the code once released? Do you have some sort of agreement with the journal that the code is part of the manuscript that they will own the copyright to? In General: When should one release the code relative to publication? ...


12

The concerns to weigh are: Scooping. Your manuscript is already out on Arxiv, so there is no risk that someone will publish your same result earlier than you. By publishing code, you make it easier for other researchers to publish follow-up works. Is this something you want? Generally yes: more science, more reproducibility, more common world knowledge, and,...


2

I've been asked for "quick opinions" from a variety of good-to-best journals, and I try to meet the obvious goal of "quick...", if nothing else. In some cases, I've easily seen the need for various sorts of revision, and immediately recommended that, with a promise that I'd look at it again later when it was more readable. In some cases, ...


6

There may be a much larger issue at stake. Simultaneous submissions are considered unethical for a series of reasons, the striking one because they lead to a waste of resources/workforce/brainwork. Imagine the new submission was addressed by a different reviewer than you. Then there will be effectively at least 2 reviewers (you and the new one) plus two ...


2

My answer is similar but slightly different that the others here: There is nothing intrinsically wrong with taking a rejected paper to another journal and that the authors are free to ignore your comments from the first review (except for cases as described by Asuranceturix). If you choose to disclose that you are reviewing the paper for a second time, this ...


8

I would state plainly the fact that you have previously reviewed this paper and your comments still stand. Of course, I don't know what your field of knowledge is, but in some journals it is actually expected from authors to have addressed comments from previous reviews even if they are from a different journal: Resubmission of Previously Rejected ...


-2

authors I would like to submit a review article, titled " xxxx " Please find the attached documents and send me your valuable comments within next week. Sincerely,


-1

I would be sure nothing was changed and then send my same comments to the editor.


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