172

If I was reviewing a paper, and the authors failed to cite important literature, I'd recommend rejection until the authors provided correct citations. It's the authors' responsibility to provide appropriate references. I assume that many other reviewers would feel the same.


110

You can write an e-mail to the authors and ask for a copy of their published paper. Almost everyone will be happy to send you one. Before doing that, check if the paper is already published on their webpage, or if they have submitted it to a preprint server. Use of preprint servers and embargo periods vary among the various disciplines --- in some fields ...


106

I wonder how reviewers would react if authors of a submitted paper refuse to cite paywalled papers. Is it a valid reason to refuse citing some papers? Certainly not. There are a few areas where this could be OK; for example, if you are citing expository material for background (rather than to assign credit), then you can choose whichever sources you feel ...


74

There are lots of reasons, but high among them are the prestige issues for their co-authors, especially their non-tenured, postdoc, and student co-authors. Everyone on the author list benefits from the typically higher prestige of the traditional (and paywalled) publishing venues.


67

A couple reasons come to mind: Tenured professors still care about prestige. And they still have promotions to consider - for example, from Associate to Full Professor, or if they fancy going after a Chair or Deanship. Open access publications are not (beyond perhaps their open status) inherently more virtuous as journals. It's possible that the best place ...


66

If you would like to boycott paywalled journals, go right ahead - that is your right. As a reviewer I would reject your paper for not citing relevant sources. As a reader of your paper and/or author of a paper you didn't cite, I would be severely antagonized as well. The bottom line is, your ideological battles should not be waged on the backs of honest ...


58

Cambridge University Press allows authors to freely distribute electronic copies of the books that it publishes, at least in mathematics and computer science. (Of course this has to be explicitly negotiated into the publishing contract.) Two good examples are Allen Hatcher's Algebraic Topology and Steve LaValle's Planning Algorithms. You could also just ...


58

Ubiquity Press breaks down their £300 ($500) APC as follows: 38% indirect costs for things not related to the publishing of a single paper but which are needed for the business (£114 or $190) 34% covers editorial and production aspects, which appears to be the costs associated with producing the paper, managing submissions, responding to authors, preparing ...


53

There are a number of reasons why not to, and they stem from the reasons one might want to publish a book, even if you aren't making much if any money: The prestige of the publisher matters. For many tenure committees, professional organizations, etc. "A Book from BigDeal University Press" > "Some Markdown Files on Github" or what have you in terms of ...


49

Don't waste your time with it. You were smart to catch how the mail might have been generated (keywords etc). These mails are often sent out by journals that turn out to be predatory*; you wouldn't like to be associated with it. If you accept, you may find your name being used here and there, in an attempt to increase the journal's scientific credibility. ...


48

Many journals are publishers' own products, "going solo" makes no sense. It's like asking why Gmail does not segregate from Google. In some cases, professional societies hire publishers to take care of their official publishing organ, I imagine your question relates to these cases. Otherwise, there have been cases of the entire editorial board leaving for ...


45

It's not necessarily crazy for academia.edu to ask for these things (although, as I say below, I certainly don't think users should agree to these terms). I imagine their lawyers advised them to use an agreement that covers all possible use cases as their business model evolves. For example, if they decided to charge their users membership fees, and only ...


45

I agree with the other answers, but they are anecdotal, and you asked for some "definitive" answers to help you convince your colleagues and advisor. Here's what I found: IEEE None of the IEEE journals has a required charge for non-open access publications. The publication FAQ says: For a detailed listing of paper charges by publication, download the ...


42

I do not see that sharing your knowledge would in any way be a problem per se. What could become a problem is if you also share copyright-protected materials. It is virtually impossible to list what might or might not be such materials but to take other persons presentations, images, data and then sharing it would be clearly illegal (and unethical) unless ...


42

Having developed academic open source software for 20 years, I have never heard anyone getting "scooped" by putting code out there. And I know lots of people who do all of their development out in the open, often years before they have it all together to make it into a publication. I believe that the reason why this never happens is that it's difficult to ...


41

The main reason is inertia and lack of information, I think. Researchers are not really aware of the costs their institutions have to face to subscribe to journals. From their perspective, publishing and reading are mostly free. It is not always easy to tell whether you have access to a PDF file because of your university's subscriptions or because it is ...


40

Some options: https://openaccessbutton.org/ http://unpaywall.org/ http://doai.io/ Also, Google Scholar will sometimes list mirror versions located elsewhere online. That said, both with that and with contacting the author on whether you can access the article, you cannot be sure that the author has studied the publisher's terms and is allowed to share ...


38

What you're describing is open access. It's simply a different form of it to the one Springer want you to pay for... There are effectively two-and-a-half routes to open access, with a lot of subtle variants between journals - Gold - the article is available immediately, freely, and in perpetuity, via the journal's website, probably with a permissive ...


37

Your idea has no chance of success. I'll ignore the part about reviewers being PhD students and postdocs and just look at the publishing model, because that alone is enough to sink the concept. Ad revenue is not enough to sustain a journal. Just consider: who is willing to pay to advertise in a journal? You might be able to get some ad revenue in a print ...


36

I know this doesn't refer strictly to the final version of a paper, but the arXiv pre-print server provides a useful bit of information to contribute to this discussion. According to its website, it receives around 76,000 publications per year. Its operating costs are on the order of $826,000 per year. You do the maths, and it comes to just over $10/article....


35

Even if a faculty member has settled into a tenured full professorship they still typically have annual evaluations for the purpose of determining pay raises, and having publications in highly ranked journals can get them a better evaluation.


35

Actually, some journals do successfully go solo, just as you suggest. A nice high-profile example is the Journal of Machine Learning Research, a top-ranked journal that formed when the entire editorial board of Machine Learning resigned to create this free alternative. This points to the main reason why traditional journals have much inertia. The reason ...


33

I wonder why tenured professors still publish in pay-walled venues. I can understand that non-tenured professors are publication pressured, but once one gets tenured, why should one still place knowledge behind walls? Who says they are placing knowledge behind walls? In many fields it's perfectly feasible to publish in pay-walled journals but still make ...


32

No. The important point is whether the journals are good (= publish good papers) rather whether the access is open or restricted. This being said, in many fields AFAIK the better journals are access-restricted.


31

From the context of your question, I assume you are a computer scientist graduate student. (Computer scientist because you mention DBLP, and graduate student because you're worried about people finding your research quickly.) My answer is specific to computer science, especially the first two points. Just post your papers on your web page already. Among ...


31

I also think that people can go to the library to get access to research. You're assuming that libraries can pay for access. That's not the case anymore. Even Harvard univerity, one of the richest in the world, can't pay for all the journals its researchers need. I think none of the Universities I know have access to all the journals it needs. So, you can ...


31

Diamond open access is like gold, in that the article is immediately open access in the journal, and nobody has to pay to read it. However, in gold open access, the author (or their institution or funding agency) normally has to pay a publication fee to get the article published. In diamond open access, they don't have to pay, so the process is completely ...


31

I am going out on a limb here and disagree with Darrin. I think there are plenty of academics who would be both, capable and perfectly willing to run a university- or self-published journal. I think it is an illusion that academics want to do only research, all the time. A lot of (tenured) academics do plenty of things that require lots of time and don't ...


28

If it has been accepted but you have not yet signed any sort of agreement, then it's easy in theory: you just tell the editor that you have decided to withdraw the paper. They might be unhappy, but you have a right to do this (both legally and according to academic norms). If the paper has already been published, then there may not be anything you can do. ...


26

The short answer is: yes, staggered posting rights like this are very common - many journals distinguish between your own website, your institutional repository, and a broader repository (eg arXiv, pubmed), with different rules about what version of the article can be posted and when; some have also begun to provide a special category for sites like ...


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