173 votes

Is it OK to refuse to cite paywalled papers?

If I was reviewing a paper, and the authors failed to cite important literature, I'd recommend rejection until the authors provided correct citations. It's the authors' responsibility to provide ...
  • 13.3k
110 votes

Access to scientific articles that cite mine after leaving academia

You can write an e-mail to the authors and ask for a copy of their published paper. Almost everyone will be happy to send you one. Before doing that, check if the paper is already published on their ...
107 votes

Is it OK to refuse to cite paywalled papers?

I wonder how reviewers would react if authors of a submitted paper refuse to cite paywalled papers. Is it a valid reason to refuse citing some papers? Certainly not. There are a few areas where this ...
73 votes

Why do tenured professors still publish in pay-walled venues?

There are lots of reasons, but high among them are the prestige issues for their co-authors, especially their non-tenured, postdoc, and student co-authors. Everyone on the author list benefits from ...
  • 48.1k
67 votes

Why do tenured professors still publish in pay-walled venues?

A couple reasons come to mind: Tenured professors still care about prestige. And they still have promotions to consider - for example, from Associate to Full Professor, or if they fancy going after a ...
  • 51.3k
67 votes

Is it OK to refuse to cite paywalled papers?

If you would like to boycott paywalled journals, go right ahead - that is your right. As a reviewer I would reject your paper for not citing relevant sources. As a reader of your paper and/or author ...
  • 174k
64 votes
Accepted

Why can't we just use platforms such as arXiv for proper peer-reviewed publishing?

There are Diamond open access journals (which are free to both author and reader) run as arXiv overlay journals. An example in my area is Logical Methods in Computer Science, which is generally well-...
  • 33.3k
61 votes
Accepted

How much does it cost the publisher to publish an academic article?

Ubiquity Press breaks down their £300 ($500) APC as follows: 38% indirect costs for things not related to the publishing of a single paper but which are needed for the business (£114 or $190) 34% ...
55 votes

If an author does not intend to make much revenue from a book, why not make it open-access?

There are a number of reasons why not to, and they stem from the reasons one might want to publish a book, even if you aren't making much if any money: The prestige of the publisher matters. For many ...
  • 51.3k
49 votes
Accepted

Why don't high-ranking journals go solo?

Many journals are publishers' own products, "going solo" makes no sense. It's like asking why Gmail does not segregate from Google. In some cases, professional societies hire publishers to take care ...
  • 26.7k
49 votes
Accepted

How serious can this review invitation be?

Don't waste your time with it. You were smart to catch how the mail might have been generated (keywords etc). These mails are often sent out by journals that turn out to be predatory*; you wouldn't ...
47 votes

I mistakenly chose the CC BY 4.0 license on arxiv. Can anyone take my paper and publish it in a journal or conference?

Can anyone publish my paper in a journal or conference? They'd need to attribute the paper to you. Most journals will only accept papers written by the person who is submitting the paper. Can a ...
  • 570
42 votes

Why don't academics bypass restrictions on the distribution of their papers the same way as an institutional open access policy seems to do?

The main reason is inertia and lack of information, I think. Researchers are not really aware of the costs their institutions have to face to subscribe to journals. From their perspective, publishing ...
  • 1,704
42 votes

How to deal with scooping when doing open-source tools development?

Having developed academic open source software for 20 years, I have never heard anyone getting "scooped" by putting code out there. And I know lots of people who do all of their development out in the ...
41 votes

Why don't high-ranking journals go solo?

Actually, some journals do successfully go solo, just as you suggest. A nice high-profile example is the Journal of Machine Learning Research, a top-ranked journal that formed when the entire ...
  • 182k
41 votes

Access to scientific articles that cite mine after leaving academia

Some options: https://openaccessbutton.org/ http://unpaywall.org/ http://doai.io/ Also, Google Scholar will sometimes list mirror versions located elsewhere online. That said, both with that and ...
  • 1,729
40 votes
Accepted

What is 'Diamond' Open Access?

Diamond open access is like gold, in that the article is immediately open access in the journal, and nobody has to pay to read it. However, in gold open access, the author (or their institution or ...
39 votes

How much does it cost the publisher to publish an academic article?

I know this doesn't refer strictly to the final version of a paper, but the arXiv pre-print server provides a useful bit of information to contribute to this discussion. According to its website, it ...
38 votes
Accepted

Do we really need gold open access if publishers permit self-archiving and sharing?

What you're describing is open access. It's simply a different form of it to the one Springer want you to pay for... There are effectively two-and-a-half routes to open access, with a lot of subtle ...
  • 7,347
38 votes

Is arXiv really a lower form of publication than the majority of computer science journals?

The standard for the arXiv is "looks like an actual paper on the first glance". So the fact that a preprint appeared on the arXiv isn't really adding any respectability to it that a ...
  • 33.3k
38 votes
Accepted

Is arXiv really a lower form of publication than the majority of computer science journals?

First, arXiv is hosted at Cornell but this does not mean it’s moderated by Cornell people (that may be true in CS but it’s not true in physics, where the pool of moderators is quite wide). Next, ...
  • 20.7k
37 votes
Accepted

Would a journal paying money for reviews, with open access and ad-based revenue, work?

Your idea has no chance of success. I'll ignore the part about reviewers being PhD students and postdocs and just look at the publishing model, because that alone is enough to sink the concept. Ad ...
  • 107k
35 votes

Why do tenured professors still publish in pay-walled venues?

Even if a faculty member has settled into a tenured full professorship they still typically have annual evaluations for the purpose of determining pay raises, and having publications in highly ranked ...
34 votes

Why do tenured professors still publish in pay-walled venues?

I wonder why tenured professors still publish in pay-walled venues. I can understand that non-tenured professors are publication pressured, but once one gets tenured, why should one still place ...
34 votes

Why don't high-ranking journals go solo?

I am going out on a limb here and disagree with Darrin. I think there are plenty of academics who would be both, capable and perfectly willing to run a university- or self-published journal. I think ...
  • 129k
27 votes
Accepted

If my paper is accepted in a Springer journal, can I submit my version of the manuscript to arXiv immediately after acceptance?

The short answer is: yes, staggered posting rights like this are very common - many journals distinguish between your own website, your institutional repository, and a broader repository (eg arXiv, ...
  • 7,347
27 votes

How much does it cost the publisher to publish an academic article?

It depends to an extent on how technically-savvy the author community is, and thus what services they need or do not need to be done for them. For computer science journals, the cost of production is ...
  • 2,261
26 votes
Accepted

Submitting ACM Conference papers to ArXiv

This is a matter of obsolete documentation. The current version of the "ACM Author Rights and Publishing Policy" you linked to is v9, last revised in 1/2016. This version says that authors have the ...
  • 107k
25 votes
Accepted

Why pay a fee to have your article (in a subscription-based journal) made open access when you can just put the preprint on arXiv?

If you work in a field in which people use and trust the arXiv, then there's little reason to pay fees for hybrid open access. One reason would be if your funding agency requires open access ...

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