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81

A conference has a number of limited slots for presentations. When your paper is accepted for a conference, someone else's paper got rejected, because it was slightly worse than yours and slots were limited. In this sense, if you are not going to present your accepted paper, this a huge disservice to the conference (and the related community). As I already ...


72

Allow me to hypothesize a different tack from most of the other answers: Simply don't engage in this issue at all. As my mentor said once, "You constantly get institutional demands for some action, in some cases it's best to ignore them, and you'll find that many just go away." This request is so incredibly unethical, and also so completely orthogonal to ...


49

The IEEE has a rather clear policy on failure to present: in general, a paper that is not presented at a conference will be withdrawn from the proceedings. I have recently been publications chair for an IEEE conference, and in that role you are explicitly asked after the conference to identify any papers that were not presented and thus need to be withdrawn ...


49

Since the other answers should properly address your question, I'll raise an issue that bothered me from the go: What do you mean you can't replicate your results? One of the cornerstones of science is the replication of results (something that is almost never done in computer science...). If you can't replicate your results, how do you expect someone else ...


47

The website has a button that says "IEEE proof", whatever that is supposed to mean, which seems like the equivalent of a folder on your computer named "definitely not porn". Understand: they're trying suspiciously hard to use their (alleged) IEEE affiliation as a marker of legitimacy and quality. Follow that link and enjoy that delightful prose: "We ...


41

This is extremely unethical. Do you have any proof of what he asked for ? If he can't check for who you did vote, there is no problem for you (but the moral problem is still here), you might just say you did it alone, without the Assistant Professor. (You do it, then that's it.) The ethical way would be to inform your university. But that is really ...


37

I have just received an email from the editor and I am writing it here Dear Dr. * * *, We cannot prevent an author to upload her/his paper to Arxiv. However, because of the double-blind process applied in Communication Letters, we don’t encourage it. There is only one restriction: Your paper should stand alone without any supplementary material and/or ...


37

I cannot make any statement about this journal and this may depend somewhat on the field, but so far I never spent more than a day’s work on any review. The main problem why reviews take so long is not that the review itself actually takes that long, but that reviewers need to find time for the review given their numerous other duties. Therefore it’s ...


36

Yes you can. If/when they accept the paper you need to perform the actions as described in: From https://www.ieee.org/documents/author_faq.pdf Can an author post his manuscript on a preprint server such as ArXiv? Yes. The IEEE recognizes that many authors share their unpublished manuscripts on public sites. Once manuscripts have been accepted for ...


29

Disclaimer: I base my answer on my familiarity with the IEEE. Other societies may follow similar conventions. For members of the IEEE, the notation in your example is a "shorthand" way for indicating when the author achieved a certain membership status within the society. For example, (S’73-M’76-SM’81-F’87) means that A. N. Author became a Student ...


28

In the end, once the paper is published, nobody will worry about what software was used to generate it. The software is just a means to an end. So, if your advisor has a strong preference for Microsoft Word then - regardless how you feel about that preference - if you can't easily convince your advisor to use LaTeX you should switch to Word. There are much ...


24

You tell us Your supervisor and co-author was meant to present your paper He didn't and you don't know why He presented two other papers, but not yours He never communicated with you that he would be unable to present your paper He did not inform the conference committee that he would be unable to present the paper, he just didn't turn up What should you ...


24

I have not seen any conference in which normal track papers where required to show simulations. However, you may very well have questions about your simulation and results. For that reason, I would be careful of presenting something in which you yourself can not replicate. At the very least, depending on how different your results are now than they were ...


22

I think you have two options: Learn to use Word. It may not be ideal, but this is probably not going to be the last time you are faced with a need to use it, or some similar editor. Offer to do all the editing. Give your professor .pdf files or printouts to comment, and then incorporate the changes yourself. =================================================...


22

It would be even more powerful to inform the IEEE (if the OP can muster the proof that this coercion is going on). But, unfair as it is, it will probably damage the OP's career irreparably. Utterly despicable - I heard such stuff only from hearsay (or from infamous examples in 20th century history). Collect evidence if you can, and, at some point in the ...


21

I'm afraid you're out of luck here. The paper was accepted and submitted, and someone should have presented the paper. Since no one withdrew the paper from the conference, and no one presented it, you're stuck at the mercy of the rules of the conference organizers. Basically, the program organizers need not mention the paper in the proceedings, nor are ...


19

You have many questions as about authorship, and I am afraid some of your questions/comments indicate a certain level of confusion about authorship. You could browse the authorship questions on this site, and it may Enlighten you to some extent. Regarding your specific questions: Should I include my supervisor as a 2nd author as he wants? First, you ...


17

I've had great experience with Google Scholar Alerts. To use them, go to scholar.google.com and search for any term. In the results page, you will see a link to Create Email Alert. Click on that and create the alert to send you notifications. One very good use of this is to follow specific papers. For example, I have a star paper of mine that I'm currently ...


17

I would do it per paper, unless the paper is extremely long and some abbreviations are defined (and used) in the start, but not used again until 20 or 30 pages later. It's okay to remind a reader what the abbreviations mean, but avoid annoying the reader by being overly and unnecessarily repetitive.


17

I just want to add two points to Alexandros' excellent answer: Registration fee is paid for attending the conference, not for publishing the paper. It may cover social events, banquet etc. Your supervisor did attend the conference, so it is unreasonable to ask for a reimburse. This is not PC chairs' fault, and you only leave a bad impression by arguing with ...


16

Overriding answer: ask your advisor. In expository work like this, what I've usually seen done is that you start the section with a note saying something like "The material in this section is primarily drawn from Handbook of Reticulated Splines by P. Smith [47]." After that, you don't bother to decorate every sentence with "[47]" or "as Smith states", ...


15

Not being affiliated with an organization such as the IEEE or ACM is not, on its own, a bad sign. For example, what is currently the IEEE Conference on Computational Complexity has decided to end its affiliation with the IEEE and go solo; the Symposium on Computational Geometry likewise just left ACM. STACS is also unaffiliated. It's not great if the ...


15

So far, in none of the IEEE conferences I have attended have I seen a compulsion of a demo from the presentation critics. Though some delegates do present a demo, but it would be of their own wish. Thus, you wouldn't have to worry about giving a simulation at the conference. The average time given to you would only be from 15-25 minutes for your ...


14

You cannot publish the same paper at these two conference. For an IEEE conference publication, you have to transfer copyright on the paper to the IEEE, which precludes publication in another proceedings. You shouldn't have submitted the same paper to two places simultaneously. It's clearly against ethical standards in academics. It is not your fault, if ...


14

I need my paper to be published within 2 months, what should I do? You cannot expect your paper to be published within 2 months in the IEEE transactions even in the luckiest case. First, you have to submit the paper, and from your question it appears that you are still preparing it. Then, once submitted, your paper should undergo the peer-review process, ...


14

First I would suggest against complaining too loudly against your adviser in public. When bad things happen they flow downhill and you don't want to be a target. Second, don't "tell the university" whatever that means. What you want to do is find a specific person at the university called the ombudsman. His or her job is to act as advocate for students ...


14

After forwarding a link to this posting to the IEEE Elections Committee, I received the reply below: Thank you for the reference. We had concerns of this sort presented to us in the past and we are aware of this issue. We are working on a reporting mechanism of such infractions but, as you can imagine, it is not straightforward. If you have ...


13

This has actually happened to me a couple of times in the past. This really depends on the policy of the organizing professional group (ACM/IEEE) and even within sub-groups of that body (SIGWEB/SIGCHI within ACM) Generally, I have found that if your paper is accepted in a conference and you or any of your co-authors register for that conference, then the ...


12

I believe that violates the terms of use for IEEE Xplore. I don't know if you are an IEEE member, institutional subscriber, etc., but the terms of use for institutional subscribers states the following: Institutional subscribers are NOT permitted to do the following: [...] Download or attempt to download an entire issue or issues of a publication ...


12

To the best of my knowledge, there is no such rule. It would be problematic to put a figure in the first column (which is tightly compressed between abstract and copyright blurb), but a figure at the top of the second column is fine. However, due to the way that document preparation is done for IEEE publications, it is highly unlikely that an author will ...


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