65

Publishing papers about psychology experiments does present an additional issue, human subject research ethics. A reputable journal is likely to require assurance that the rights and welfare of the research subjects were protected during the research. If you were working or studying at a research university in many countries the university would have some ...


43

Yes. I would have a separate section of your paper entitled something like "Further exploratory analysis", report what you did and what you found, and note that until a study has been design to specifically test your hypothesis, it remains a hypothesis, but suggest that it might be an attractive target for further study.


14

My best advice is to be very upfront about the fact that 1.) You found some relations in your data that were not apart of your original hypotheses you were interested in testing. 2.) These results relations were still interesting enough to share, although the evidence should be taken with a grain of salt. Because these relations were found spuriously, ...


12

You are absolutely able to publish the results of observational studies with no oversight, and this has been done before without university affiliation. However once you get into 'experiment' territory where human or animal subjects are manipulated in some way, all respectable journals require that you have informed consent or IACAUC review and approval. ...


8

The Council of Science Editors has published a White Paper on Promoting Integrity in Scientific Journal Publications that gives a summary of research on authorship and attribution in scientific journals (see section 2.2 of the report). I recommend you begin by reading this material, to get an idea of the general principles for authorship and the required ...


5

To the best of my knowledge, you would need to somehow indicate both but a similar question has been asked and answered before: What affiliation to put on an academic paper for alumni authors? You have to acknowledge that part of the work was performed when you were at your university. I had a similar situation where I did part of the work when I was at ...


4

The point of having affiliations in papers is to indicate where the person currently is based. That space is not a historical track of where the paper has been written (which would be entirely confusing... "so, where is this person now?"). Having said this, it is healthy to add somewhere else an acknowledgement to people and institutions that have been ...


4

Usually, nothing happens, except damage to the submitting author's reputation. Anything could happen. It depends on the coauthor's feeling and the content of the paper. If the content of the paper is objectionable, then this might lead to retraction. Potentially the submitting author could be fired. But most likely, if a coauthor complains, the ...


3

Yes, of course you can ask. But in some fields there are other considerations that are considered important and first authorship is assigned for reasons not obvious to people from other fields. Sometimes those reasons are just political, but people go along with them to keep peace. It might also be necessary to keep the peace with a supervisor who has ...


3

Others already told you: when a paper is written by that lab that uses your program, it will depend on how important an intellectual contribution you added to the subject of the paper. This comes in two "sizes": authorship for significant intellectual contribution or acknowledgement if your contribution was "merely" technical, i.e. you implemented the ...


2

Open source software is used everywhere. For all example, nearly all of High Performance Computing, and the entire field of Computational Science and Engineering (CS&E) works with open source software, and does so very successfully. Furthermore, these packages are often at least as good or better than what commercial packages can offer. Many of these ...


2

Yes, open-source code can be used for research if it is cited everywhere you use results from it. You may first like to verify that the code is indeed open-source by verifying that the license is one of these: https://opensource.org/licenses This should be listed clearly on the website/repository/license/readme file. If this is not available, try contacting ...


2

Many times, you receive comments such as:I am unable to accept your manuscript for publication in "Journal name" The reason for this decision is that in its current state, the level of English throughout your manuscript does not meet the journal's required standard. The work was revised thoughtfully and reach reviewing stage in higher impact journal but was ...


2

You seem to be asking if it is possible that due to your affiliation, your paper is rejected for bogus reasons. While this cannot be ruled out with certainty, such cases should be very rare in reputable journals. Reviewers are advised to only take the scientific content and the clarity of the presentation into account. It is quite common that a ...


2

If the co-author is fine with the content of the paper, then submitting it without his/her knowledge isn't that big a deal - (s)he's likely to approve anyway. I'm guessing that this (point 3 in the case listed by COPE) is a big part of the reason why half the Forum suggested the editor do nothing. Another big part could be that the paper has apparently ...


1

First of all, I'd say this question is off-topic here, because it relates more to statistics than academia as a whole. In any case the answer by Janosch is accurate, when doing a statistical test, an observation is either significant or not. Sometimes people use stars to annotate the level of significance a particular result would be able to clear, for ...


1

It sounds completely justifiable to be the first coauthor. Depending on how much work the drafts needed you may even qualify to be the first author. If the experimental data was near-useless, the ideas half-baked and you needed to do most of the heavy lifting you could definitely argue that. Something like this happened to me during my PhD. A colleague who'd ...


1

I don't understand the basis of your worry unless you signed a non-disclosure agreement as part of your internship. Don't assume that everyone hearing of your research, even in some detail, will immediately want to (or could) try to scoop you on a publication. People generally are more honest than that. But it is, I think, fairly easy to discuss research ...


1

This should be fine, so long as you're doing appropriate multiple hypothesis correction. Note in your manuscript what types of exploratory variables you evaluated for association, and how many of them there were. If your p-value is still significant after multiple hypothesis correction, that means there's still a stronger association than you'd expect by ...


1

Of course it’s also possible to have Zero the Hero, Department of Nothing and Institute of Heroes, Gong University or else you can have your “old” address on the byline with a footnote to your new address: Zero the Hero*, Department of Nothing, Gong University (* now at Institute of Heroes, Gong University ) The latter (and variations on this) is ...


1

If the original institute provided funding or support for the research, I'd suggest keeping that as your affiliation. It may be just "noise" to list both, provided that anyone using the affiliation to contact you or disambiguate names will find you without both. The university will get your mail to the right place, I'd guess. I might want to list both if, ...


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