12

Each platform has its uses, so it's best to use both GitHub for your code and a scientific data archival repository, such as Zenodo, for your code and data. GitHub allows you to share your code in a manner that encourages collaboration through stars, issues, forks, pull requests, and notifications. So definitely put a copy of your code there. However, ...


6

In (sufficiently) theoretical fields, such as theoretical computer science, parts of theoretical physics, or mathematics, it is completely fine to publish a paper without graphics. Whether in the case of your specific paper, topic, or field graphics would have helped is a different question, and essentially impossible to answer here with the information ...


4

My inclination would be to say exactly (but succinctly) what's going on, perhaps a citation like "[A] (cited from [B] but not found in the published version of [B])".


3

Based on the discussion in the comments, i.e. given that your primary concern is that the paper might be rejected after a very slow editorial process and then be hard to get accepted at another journal because it is no longer relevant/"hot"/topical/etc ... I think you have only two (not entirely distinct) choices. As suggested by @EthanBolker, try ...


3

It would be very good to upload the reports in a repository, for the reasons you give. You can do it provided this is not explicitly forbidden by a copyright statement on the reports. If the copyright status is absent or unclear, do it anyway, the worst that can happen is that you are asked to remove a report. (This once happened to me after I posted ...


3

There are a few solutions: Use a different dataset for your paper. For example, if you design a new data clustering algorithm but cannot use the company data to evaluate your algorithm, you may find alternative datasets that could be OK to use just for the purpose of writing the papers. I have done this for some industrial project. Some companies may accept ...


3

If during submission, you clearly state that this is a translation of paper X, then I don't see an issue. It might however be a good idea to inquire with the journal beforehand whether they do publish translations of already published papers; not all journals might do that. Also, you need to check with the journal where the English version has been published ...


2

It depends on your co-authors' personal preferences. 1.) Industry affiliation: They could ask their employers in industry whether they may name the company as their affiliation. They are, after all, employed there, and it is likely that the employment at least partly facilitated the research. I see two additional benefits to this option: (1) The employer may ...


2

Listing a former affiliation as if it is current is not right. Listing an employer as an affiliation may run afoul of their rules. Permission may be required. And if they didn't support the research it is good for disambiguation purposes but no other. Listing yourself as an Independent Researcher is correct in almost all cases, though your employer should ...


2

Go to your profile page. Click on "Edit profile". You will be redirected to the "Author Feedback Wizard", where one category is called "Review documents". Scroll down and click on "Search missing documents". Find your paper and confirm - if you cannot find it, perhaps make sure that the publication is indeed ...


2

If you want to be a scientist (and I suspect this applies to Computer Science) then you must learn to do some graphic design, or have enough money to pay someone to do it for you. Admittedly there are some fields of research where nobody uses graphics. But in the fields where I work, >90% of papers have 3+ graphics. One of the reasons for the graphics ...


2

I think the reviewer was overstating the need. They are often helpful and sometimes essential, but not in every paper as you have seen. But you might want to explore drawing programs more fully. And most composing systems from MS Word on up permit you to add graphics, sometimes by just cut and paste. Most graphics programs will create standard file format ...


2

Similar to Anonymous Physicist, I think graphics are important, although I think "casual reader" is not the right viewpoint. Academics have to read lots of papers. But there are many more papers than you really have time to read. You have to learn a method for evaluating whether a given paper is really worth spending serious time to read. A good ...


2

Search for the paper on google scholar in the "Search" field. In the search results, it will say "Cited by" below each hit, and if you click you can see the citations. Moreover, once you see the list of citations, there is an option "Create alert" on the left which allows to create an alert alerting you when the paper is cited.


2

I sometimes used to supervise undergraduate dissertations through the process of agreeing an NDA with an industrial partner company. The university's internal IP team would usually carry out the initial drafting of the NDA. The university IP team's draft would invariably subject students and academic staff to restrictions onerous enough to be damaging to ...


2

Online sources are "liquid". Some have thus suggested to "freeze" them as durable PDFs and to make them available in a repository as supplementary material (I might have seen this suggestion here). This ensures transparency and replicabilty. So, I would say: Yes, the approach you think about seems fine. There should not be any legal ...


2

It would depend on the policies of the preprint server, but I'm not aware of any that would accept a "preprint" submission from someone other than the reports' authors. A better long-term approach would be to contact the British Medical Association and ask them to register their own DOIs for these repots. They already register DOIs for their ...


1

Whlie user151413's response is correct regarding Google Scholar, one could add some other possibilities (as your question seemed open-ended), such as the following: Altmetric / Dimensions Find the relevant Altmetric page of the publication and click on "Alert me about new mentions", which includes scholarly citations as tracked through Dimensions. ...


1

I am in a bit of a dilemma about whether this deserves a separate answer, as it is similar to the first suggestion in Phil's answer, but I do think it is slightly different. In any research field, therefore also in Computer Science and Machine Learning, we should strive to offer theories and approaches which generalise well to (m)any conditions and data. So ...


1

There are several questions hidden within this one. The first is whether you retain copyright after the abstract appears. If not, and if the figure is fairly substantial (in the information conveyed and in design elements) then you may need to seek permission from the copyright holder to reuse it. And you will also, then, need to cite the abstract. This is ...


1

I'm very much alive, and have appeared as a co-author on a paper published 6 years after my contribution. Delays can happen for many reasons. In my case, the work I did was a crucial early step, and the group couldn't take it further. By the time they could, I had moved on, but my contribution was still enough to warrant authorship. This was in a field ...


1

This situation can happen, just like some professors have been caught putting the name of their son or their wife on their paper in the past. Generally, the editor will not verify if authors really contributed to a paper because it would be hard to verify. Hence, journals adopts some simple mechanism such as requiring that authors disclose what are the ...


1

Can someone guide me on how is it possible? There are several ways that some people use to publish more papers per year: Some split their project in several ideas that can be published as separate papers to make as many papers as possible. For example, in CS, they may publish an algorithm in a conference paper, and then an optimized version of that ...


1

There are a lot of paper databases out there you can use to find some papers to read: ACM: https://www.acm.org/ arXiv: https://arxiv.org/ Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.com/ IEEEXplorer: https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/ ScienceDirect: https://www.sciencedirect.com/ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/ But not all the retrieved papers from these ...


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