90

Let's see: You wrote a paper of sufficient writing quality that it was chosen for presentation at a conference and publication. None of the peer reviewers noticed anything wrong with it. None of the people in the audience questioned it. Your supervisor saw nothing wrong with it. You gave an excellent presentation. You found a flaw in a paper that had ...


36

Relax. You're not the first person to make a mistake, and people are not likely to know that you had been celebrating (besides, even if you were ... so what?). The fact that you found the error yourself is furthermore a good sign, since it means you're taking your work seriously and subjecting it to the scrutiny it deserves. Take a look at this. The first ...


14

Yes, and there are a lot of reasons for errors. There is also a large machinery for keeping errors out, but they fail regularly enough. Sometimes the error is a misunderstanding by a copy editor. In printed work, even by the printer's employees. But the biggest issue is probably how hard it is for people to proof read their own material. I struggle with ...


12

There is one other thing you can consider doing, after getting agreement from the conference committee. You can put a note in the paper for publication, noting that you have found a serious error and explaining the nature of the error. Don't bother with apologies and such, but just point out where the paper is wrong. This assumes, of course, that you don'...


7

Your list of accomplishments is still very impressive, and I would moreover add that this is extremely common, even for very established researchers. I don't know your field, but in computer science my empirical belief is that the majority of papers contain mistakes; usually minor and hopefully simple fixes, sometimes more major fixes that don't invalidate ...


5

To the best of my knowledge, you would need to somehow indicate both but a similar question has been asked and answered before: What affiliation to put on an academic paper for alumni authors? You have to acknowledge that part of the work was performed when you were at your university. I had a similar situation where I did part of the work when I was at ...


4

You are overthinking it. A simple note is all you really need. "The paper needs to be withdrawn as we have found a serious error that we don't believe can be corrected in time for the conference." This won't have been the first time that a paper has been withdrawn. It is a matter of scheduling sessions for the program committee but some of the members are ...


4

If the suggestion of Andreas Blass doesn't work for you, then include a note somewhere saying that the professor is late in assigning grades to the class as a whole and that questions about that should be directed to the chair or the dean. Give an email address for that person as well as the name. You don't need to accuse the professor of anything and ...


3

Others told you already that it is not uncommon to have mistakes or errors in papers. I go a step further: consider that scientific work means being right at the edge of what is currently known. Honest mistakes will happen every so often, and maybe more often in science as a consequence of venturing into the unknown*, and without any particular fault of ...


3

I agree with the other answers, but think that it's worth considering what it's worth to have your contribution out there for others to benefit from--the whole point is to make each other smarter! As perhaps an extreme example, if this were medicine, and your imperfect paper could jump start others in saving lives, then surely it would be moral to make the ...


2

One way is to try to ask him to help on the part you are normally doing alone. I'm not sure which way such request would work best (you may just tell him that you need some help and all other participants are busy with their own stuff, or it may happen that you both want to go to a movie and you just tell him that you cannot until you get something done, but ...


2

It sounds like this question is about undergraduate research. If an undergraduate student does not want to participate in research, that's fine. They're welcome to have other priorities. Other students have no responsibility to deal with a student who is not participating. If a student is trying to get credit for participating in research but does not ...


2

No work is perfect; mistakes are everywhere: There's a reasonable chance the equation contains a typo, especially since a different, presumably correct equation is used elsewhere. You can confirm in various ways. I suggest you start by looking at publications that followed the thesis. You may find the author has already corrected errors. Next, you could ...


1

Transcripts do not indicate pending investigations (and in some places that might be illegal). You do not need to worry about that. Incomplete grades are indicated on a transcript as incomplete. They are not indicated by blank spaces. The only possible explanation for a blank grade is that the instructor did not assign a grade. There is no benefit to ...


1

I don't know any specific expectations in Canada but I doubt the expectations about research experience are very high when applying for a Master. Also you seem to assume that informal experience doesn't count, but it probably does: for instance you could do a small project, e.g. reproducing state of the arts results for a problem of interest and analyzing ...


1

It is the institution where the work was primarily conducted. You can add a note/comment that ‘author x is now at y’ but officially it would be the former in most cases


1

I don't understand the basis of your worry unless you signed a non-disclosure agreement as part of your internship. Don't assume that everyone hearing of your research, even in some detail, will immediately want to (or could) try to scoop you on a publication. People generally are more honest than that. But it is, I think, fairly easy to discuss research ...


1

When were the C's? If there were early on in your undergraduate career, then it's less of a thing to worry about and it'll help that you had an upward trend afterwards. I got into an REU at a very top school in my field this past summer after a terrible junior year (2.8 GPA both semesters). At the REU, one of the guys on my project team noted they had one ...


1

You have two options. First option: decline to be the author of the paper, second option: write and submit the paper as first author. In the second case, the paper will go under review and the reviewers and the editors will decide if it is a good publishable result. Personally I would choose the second option in a high-medium ranking journal. In this way, if ...


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