34

It is really hard to see how it would hurt. A very few might question whether the person actually needs a degree to verify what they are already capable of, but most know that the degree is necessary for advancement. I think it more likely that a degree could be expedited for such a person, though not all requirements would be waived. I also think that a lot ...


31

You should not be afraid of asking. For example: Dear Prof. X I am wondering if the results of our work this summer would be worth publishing. I think they could be interesting to the community because [...]. Do you think it would make sense to write a paper about them? But you can do it in any other way: the format is not so important. To debunk your ...


22

(I am a postdoc in research university in the US, regularly supervise undergrads and phd-level students) The most important part is to be brief. Nobody has time or energy to read more than few sentences. If they have time for any student they will likely talk to you in person to figure out details. If they don't have time for students right now, they will ...


14

There is no special format or no special etiquette for this. Just ask. Straight up. But don't forget the follow up questions if they say no. Why? What do I/we still need to do to make it worth publishing? These are completely natural questions for a newcomer to research. If this is a cross-border collaboration then you might also ask who else might be ...


11

If the research papers are solid research papers, the friend should try some fast-track PhD, maybe in Europe, like take the rest of the current unpublished research, add a little more and write a thesis and be done after 1 year. Going through a full PhD program looks like a serious waste of time for them.


7

I originally posted this as a comment, but I think it's closer to an answer and seemed to satisfy the OP. I think the value you will get from publishing this paper, will far outweigh the "costs" of Having an ongoing, difficult argument with your advisor about an opinion that doesn't have a black-and-white factual answer (you are very unlikely to ...


6

But he is currently worried whether too many publications will harm his chance of getting admitted into graduate programs. Yes, for Computer Science. If an undergrad student in CS tells me that they have 25 papers, then I can definitely tell all of them are rubbish, even if they are not in predatory journals. After becoming a 1st year PhD student (10+ years ...


6

The case study is a qualitative research method in several disciplines, mostly in the social sciences.1 A research paper that builds on this method might also be referred to as a "case study".2 1 See e.g. Gerring, J. (2007) Case Study Research: Principles and Practices (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press). 2 See e.g. Hooghe, L. (2005) ‘Several ...


5

I think Andrew's answer is already really helpful, and I simply want to share that when I disagree with my co-authors, I found it helpful to frame the problem as anticipating reviewers' critique. In other words, you can frame it in a way that you are on the same team as your advisor, and you are really just trying to do your due diligence to address ...


3

I worry that you have the wrong idea about the SoP and will lose a chance to use it properly to advance your candidacy. The SoP isn't about what you have done in the past. It isn't about giving extra emphasis or explanation about things in the CV. The SoP is about the future. What do you plan to do, both in the program you want to enter and thereafter. Make ...


3

A "case study" can mean several things: A small[*] piece of original research that was published as part of another research paper or review. For example: a paper describes a theory and subsequently applies it to a small and well-defined subset (a case) of possible applications of the theory, thereby providing anecdotal evidence that the theory is ...


3

This is perfectly fine and very consistent with your state of education. It is a good thing to show and illustrate your accomplishments! However, keep in mind: this changes with time. While it is 100% ok to highlight low-tier accomplishment (non-peer reviewed publications, publications on topic you have only worked on in an early and very short time, student ...


2

You describe the adviser's opinion as "very unpopular", from which I infer that he has overstated the importance of his work previously, and that other people in his field know about his tendency to brag. If that's true, then I think you have nothing to worry about. When they see your name along with his on the paper, and then they see his familiar ...


1

such a suggestion could look naive, or worse, he might think I am in it just for a publication... There are several good things to be said about looking naive when asking this kind of question that may involve a substantial commitment by your professor to see it through: you may receive a more complete answer, where your professor takes some time to lay ...


1

Absolutely do proceed with publishing. Moreover, if you plan on extending your little collaboration, think of the following - you both have some ideas and something you deem important or true. Arguing these points furthers research, but you both ought to approach that with some constructive ideas. Argument of "I think this is true" - "Nah, ...


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