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8

I pretty strongly suggest that you don't claim a title of any kind unless it is formally conferred. That is, if you want your CV to be credible. But there is a difference between "University Guest Lecturer" and "university guest lecturer". The first seems to be a title, but the latter is just descriptive. You can certainly describe what you do in a CV ...


4

If your undergraduate program requires a Bachelor's Thesis, graduate school admissions committees might expect to see it on your CV. Completely omitting your thesis in your CV might raise questions. Your ability to do independent work is also important, even in another field. If your thesis work is not related to your graduate school field, I would mention ...


3

No, do not list the journal you submitted it to. Frankly, it means nothing: anyone can submit anything to any journal. Of course, you want to your CV to accurately reflect how much work you've been doing lately, but there's always a chance that the paper gets rejected in the in-between phase. A good enough compromise is to just post the arXiv info, when ...


3

Do not lie. You never know who is going to read your application. What if the committee includes a Russian person who is familiar with the Russian system and spots the inconsistency right away? I would write the actual job title and then describe the tasks you had there, emphasizing that they were research tasks.


2

A "lecturer" is usually considered an academic title. So if you are just giving an invited talk, that would usually be considered a seminar; if you are invited to teach an occasional 6-week long course, then maybe it could be justified to call yourself a "guest lecturer" for that period. Whether or not you "can" do this is somewhat subjective. You do ...


2

"Communicated" means the manuscript is submitted to a journal and is currently under review.


2

There's obviously not a single answer to this question. How many papers you have published may dictate to whom you send the CV, but how you write it is something different. You can always try to apply for a position as you are, or you can try to do a post-doc and get some more publications. Other than that, the CV advice is the same as any CV. Emphasize ...


2

I don't think it's improper per se, but I would not include them. These sorts of presentations are more akin to assignments for a class: they can improve your skills in terms of public speaking and also getting deeper into the material. However, you wouldn't put your course assignments on a CV, and I wouldn't put these presentations on a CV either. I ...


2

I would suggest a slight variation to how you can present such work: Research Projects section in your CV. Give a short (1-sentence like) info about each research project and your contribution right inside the CV and include a link to your website, where these unpublished papers/reports are available. Reasons: you want to show the research experience that ...


2

List it -- your CV should list all honors that would help convince others that you really are as good as you claim to be. Having gotten a fellowship is such an honor -- whether or not you actually take it or not is irrelevant for your purpose.


2

As a past admissions committee member for graduate studies (in a different discipline), one of our biggest concerns were which applicants had the independence, stick-with-it-ness, and structuring and writing ability to finish a degree. A thesis in any discipline is solid evidence of that and will likely be looked on favorably. From another angle, it is ...


1

My feeling is that unless you did phenomenally well (well within top 5%), it would not be of much relevance to those looking at your application (the likely effect would be this), and if you did do phenomenally well, then its inclusion could have the same effect as mentioning having an IQ score of 160 or more (something you'd probably not want to do, even if ...


1

The issue is that the items (a, b, c...) become too many (8 in my case). Or maybe I need to split them base on milestones (based on preprints and thesis results). Perhaps have a single list entry per publication. (Each list entry can highlight several points.) I have taken two projects-based courses, where the professors talk about details about each ...


1

There are two key elements of such applications, normally called the CV and the SoP (Statement of Purpose). Your CV details your past accomplishments and should probably be complete. Your SoP is directed at your future goals with some care given as to how the past enables the future. So, my recommendation is to include everything in the CV. This avoids any ...


1

Put it in for clarity, it's not padding. The point of a CV is not just to claim a set of knowledge, but to provide evidence of skills like research, analysis, self-motivation. Also, you never know where you are going to end up, some time in the future you may do research at the intersection of these interests (such as how the brain interprets music).


1

I would think it is fine, provided that you think the talks would be interesting to others outside your department. The heading you suggest is appropriate, showing that they were local. And, if you are interested in a career as an educator, primarily, rather than a researcher, they might be especially valuable. If you are able, in these talks, to focus on ...


1

On my resume, I put the official job title in the language of the country where the job was located, and a loose translation into English to summarize how I perceive the mapping. This ensures that all information is in your CV in a truthful way, while also providing the context to enable correct interpretation. So my resume says something like: 20xx-20xx: ...


1

I do not like it when people write unqualified statements. You say you have good time planning skills and good teamwork. How can you prove it? Did you successfully complete a complex project? Did you manage a team before? Did you collaborate with many people? You say you have a curious nature and good problem solving skills. How can you prove it? Did you ...


1

Focus on your academic skills. Stress the suitability of your background and your likelihood of success in any program. That is how you will be judged. For undergraduate admissions it can be a bit different (in the US, anyway), but not for doctoral study. Stick to business. The other things may save you when you are in the process, but that is a personal ...


1

First the difference between a GPA of 3.76 and 3.8 doesn't seem very big or relevant to me. Beyond that, in general I would not put the two numbers in the application. Put the GPA of your already graded courses, so the 3.76 and write next to it that it is preliminary and in particular does not contain your thesis grade yet, which accounts for 20% of the ...


1

Are your lecturing with a formal contract, or is it just a volunteer activity? Does your name appear on the course syllabus and on the university website? If yes, that would fall into the case of "professore a contratto" (even if just for a part of a course), and I would endorse the translation as as guest lectures. Otherwise, it would seem like an abuse ...


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