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13

No, this is not a problem. Everyone has papers on their CV which have few citations, including older papers. If this were true for all your papers, in particular even all of those which are several years old, this could be an issue - but this does not seem to be a problem at all in your case. (Note that the distribution of citations vs. papers is somewhat ...


10

There is nothing in the statement ``(an Academic CV template is available here)'' indicating this is a required format. I would assume that most applicants would not use the template. I suspect the template is there to help applicants. Does it have a place for hobbies? If not, probably you want to not list hobbies. It does have a place for ``...


7

Doing this does convey useful information: it signals that the individual has made a conscious decision not to post their CV online. If you come across this statement when looking for someone's CV you know not to waste more time searching. I think this is the real reason people do it, rather than any concern that people might otherwise not think to send an ...


5

Re-formatting the application pack for each vacancy is a huge waste of time. Some parts of it, such as the cover letter, may need to be adjusted to match the requirements of the vacancy. Other parts, such as CV, Publication List, Research statement, Teaching statement, etc, reflect your current profile. A University which asks these documents to be re-...


5

I suspect that most of the applicants will use the template. I also suspect that the search committee will expect all applicants' CVs to be in the same order. If it were I, I'd use the template, omit entirely the things that aren't applicable in your case, and very briefly address those in a cover letter.


5

There are no formal requirements on how GPA is calculated and reported in one's CV unless you are filing an application to a particular company that has articulated such rules (which I have not heard of). Such rules usually exist during the admission process to the universities (especially many caveats and intricacies are present for grades conversion in the ...


5

Academic CVs can get quite long, listing conferences presented at, committees served on, etc. It's easy to see that some people would feel that the whole world doesn't need such a detailed record of their life. Actively ask another researcher for their CV, I think it's more likely a non-academic would need this sort of thing. Here are some ideas why you ...


4

If a publication is either published or accepted at a journal, list it under your "normal" publications - if you want, you can choose the caption "Peer-reviewed publications". If it is not published yet, write "accepted at $JOURNAL", or similar. If the paper is still under review, or otherwise not published at a peer-reviewed ...


4

You may get a small bump by being a good answerer on the technical stacks, like Physics or Cross Validated. I've heard MathOverflow in particular has a decent recognition among mathematicians. Especially if you are applying for a teaching position, showing a good track record wouldn't hurt, even if only 1 in 25 people have heard of Stack Exchange (which ...


4

Short answer: privacy. When you're not looking for new opportunities, why should you expose your life to everyone who visits your website? Of course there are differnt views at that. Making the CV available on request is one of them. In addition, it may not only be a concern about actual visitors, but an option to stop all kinds of bots from indexing your CV....


3

I probably don't have the best perspective, having been out of academia for a few years, but as far as I know, anyone who cares about citation metrics will be using a standard widely-inclusive data source (e.g. Google Scholar) to get their data. So as far as the metrics are concerned, it doesn't matter whether you put any given paper on your CV or not. More ...


3

Unlike an American industry resume, an academic CV does not have a length limit. It would be appropriate to list all your teaching experience.


3

If: the person specification for the job calls for skill X; and you think to yourself "I demonstrated skill X in StackExchange post Y"; and your StackExchange history doesn't contain anything likely to be offensive or embarrassing (given your user name, check the recruiter isn't a descendant of the house of Valois) then it might well be ...


2

specific sections, such as contribution to the department, contribution to the faculty, contribution to the university and to enterprise They're all standard for academic CVs and if the institution has included them on its template they reflect the criteria against which your application will be assessed.


2

Just call it "Research Experience." The fact that you happened to earn course credit at the same time you did the research is irrelevant to the needs of employers.


2

Work in Progress is good and it is good to have such a section. You can also annotate each paper title with the expected time to (or of) submission. "Submission expected in December 2020", for example.


2

I am applying for a Ph. D. program after a 10 year career of secondary classroom teaching - I have held several positions in that time should I cut some of these teaching experiences out to make my CV fit one page Rather than cutting them out, why not list them, but omit descriptions, e.g., 2018 - 2020 Department Head, School, City 2012 - 2018 Senior XYZ, ...


1

I personally have several links in my CV: Links to my publications. This allows for a reader to quickly find my publications without having to search. A link to GitHub. This allows for a reader to see the code that I have produced. A link to LinkedIn. This allows for a reader to interact with me on LinkedIn if they so choose. A link to my Math Genealogy. ...


1

It's conceivable, e.g. if you are a headhunter or someone who isn't an expert in the field but is looking for someone who is (for example, a publisher looking for someone to start a new journal; a journalist looking for someone to interview). That said, the number of hits one gets for just having a CV on one's website is likely to be much larger than the ...


1

Yes. I'm not aware of the term "funded" having a strict or legal definition. If you got paid every semester, then it sounds like you were fully-funded, and it's fine to say this. As for what employers want, I'm sure this varies widely, but I doubt that being "fully funded" by itself will count for much. If you had to go through a ...


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