186

How infeasible is transitioning as an early-career faculty member? I transitioned as a postdoc back in 2013, so I did it. Whether or not it's a terrible idea depends on many factors, and just plain luck. I don't have experience in industry, so I can't comment much on that. But I'm sure it's the same situation: it depends on many factors, and plain luck. ...


85

Getting a rejection sucks. There is not much you can do about it. My wife and I have talked about this a lot and as candidates the only thing we wanted to know was how close we were and how we stacked up against the people who beat us. When sitting on search committess we have had various levels of success trying to inform candidates in the rejection letter ...


70

Assuming they liked your presentation, and consider putting you on the shortlist, but are not sure at which position compared to some other candidate; now, reflect, which impression this makes. You made a nontrivial mistake which is also quite costly. You ask them to cover that mistake of yours. Even if they would be willing to do so (and assume it would ...


67

I suggest contacting the department that hired you (the department chair and/or a few colleagues you trust) and explaining the problem. If it is a good university in a developed country, it is almost certain they would have all kinds of resources (both formal and informal) that you are not aware of to help new faculty members with issues related to their ...


62

There is quite a bit going on here. First things first: you seem to suggest that it is a code of honor among academics to never write a weak or negative recommendation letter or to omit all weak points in a letter. I think that's too strong. Indeed, when people suggest declining to write letters, I think they are mostly thinking of letters for students of ...


57

I suggest dealing with the situation by revising your (misguided, IMO) definition of “failure”. Even if it is, as you say, “ineluctable”, that you will fail to land a tenure-track position this year, you will still be a highly qualified and highly successful person with excellent career prospects. To refer to this as a failure is itself a failure - a failure ...


52

While its not mandatory to wear a suit for a faculty interview, it doesn't hurt, and may actually be expected in certain disciplines. Best to ask around beforehand. I've never heard of a dress code for student visit, but something semi-formal doesn't hurt. As a general principle, it doesn't hurt to be more dressed up than necessary. The reverse can often ...


49

I am the chair of the faculty recruiting committee in a Very Good Department at a Big Research University. I read research and teaching statements. I need to know that you have a compelling agenda for your future research; your letters won't talk about that at all. I need to know that you can describe and motivate your research agenda well enough to ...


49

I would tell it like it is: You have a two-body problem and a 2.5-hour commute that you need to solve. As soon as you say those words, everyone will understand.


42

There are two issues at play here depending on if you are formally part of the hiring process. If you are formally part of the hiring processing asking questions about the family life of a job candidate, man or woman, is treading on thin ice. Even if the information is not meant to be discriminatory (e.g., as a search chair you might want to be helpful and ...


42

Rebecca Stones has already given a great answer that got my upvote. But allow me to offer some personal perspective based on my experience here in US. I transitioned about 20 years ago. The world is a much less hostile environment for trans people today than it was then. I think you will find academia, at least here in the US, to be an especially ...


39

In general, don't attribute inaction to malice or fraud when it almost certainly is just due to laziness, disorganization, or incompetence. University bureaucracies, especially in some countries, can be unbelievably slow. Sadly, three weeks is often not a particularly long period to go unreimbursed. Be patient and persistent and this will almost certainly ...


37

In many cases, they might think it is clear from the job title. In the US, job titles with the words "Lecturer", "Instructor", "Adjunct", "Visiting", "Clinical" are almost always non-tenure-track. The job title "Assistant Professor" is usually tenure-track, though with some exceptions: "named" assistant professorships like "John Doe Assistant Professor" ...


37

The rules differ from country to country, university to university, and department to department. On a practical note, I would not want to be in a supervisory role towards a family member. In that role I need to be able to make unpleasant decisions, like tell someone if (s)he did a bad job, handle complaints, or even discontinue employment. That is hard ...


37

Most people who TA don't have an option as it is what pays the bills and allows them to study. It is less valuable if you can pay your own way. But it isn't entirely without value. I once held a full fellowship for study (multi year), but it still required that I spend one of those years doing the equivalent of a TA. The feeling was that it is valuable ...


36

Unless you're already eligible to work in the US (e.g. as a permanent resident), you'll have to answer the second question with a "no." The three aspects of US employment/immigration law that you need to know about are that Newly hired employees are required to prove that they're eligible to work in the US by filling out an I-9 form and providing the ...


34

This situation should not actually arise if you are handling your faculty job search properly. If you accept an offer, you should withdraw all your remaining job applications. Otherwise either you are wasting their time in considering you for a position you won't accept, or you were insincere in accepting the previous offer. If you aren't comfortable ...


34

I don't know how mathjob distributes candidates' applications to schools, but I doubt anyone cares. I put all applications I get for my job postings into a folder in no particular order and never look at the order of application. Someone has to be first. Go ahead! Apply away!


33

Presumably your interview is doing a good job screening out the individuals who you feel "don't know the subject" and you are trying to screen them out prior to the interview. I think a reasonable screening tool could be a a phone interview. You should probably conduct between 10-15 phone interviews to find the 6 candidates you want to interview. While I ...


33

I think you should avoid giving their full names, as opposed to just their first names unless they give permission for it. Better, using an alias for the students protects their privacy but doesn't cost you any thing in the telling of the stories. Alice and Bob, as usual. But some readers might actually wonder whether you were too personal with the ...


30

I think you tell the chair of the department some version of what you've told us: you're very excited about joining the institution (very important to say that first!), but you don't feel like the the salary is appropriate for the position, and you would find it much easier to accept the offer if the salary were increased. Negotiating over salaries is quite ...


30

I'm serving on a hiring committee this year that received roughly 180 applications for a tenure track position in mathematics. All of the members of the committee reviewed all of the applications. Most could be very easily eliminated from consideration (PhD not completed yet, PhD in a field other than mathematics, wrong area, etc.) Although I got through ...


30

I would not tell anyone anything until you have accepted the position (ideally with a signed contract). Leaving a position on short notice leaves your colleagues in a bind to cover your teaching and leaves your graduate students (and possibly lab personnel) at risk. If you are given an offer, you may be able to negotiate solutions to these problems (or the ...


30

I can only repeat what @DanRomik said in his comment. Tenure track jobs at good universities are rare. There is no guarantee that you will get such an opportunity again. I understand that the situation is inconvenient, but it is not impossible. In particular, many problems can be solved if you're willing to consider spending money. For example, don't buy a ...


29

Please don't do this- you'll only be wasting the time of the search committee members. Furthermore, you'll be doing something that is dishonest, and you do should not get into the habit of lying to people. If it becomes apparent early in the search process that you aren't truly interested in the position then the committee will probably not invite you ...


29

You've gotten solid advice from your advisor. At the math departments at many research universities, it is very rare to seriously consider an applicant straight out of a PhD. However at most teaching jobs this is not rare at all. These are rules of thumb, not absolutes. Eleven years ago in my department (UGA) we hired someone straight of a PhD program. ...


29

This means that the entire search has been placed "on hold" or even cancelled. This does not indicate any judgment on your abilities or suitability for the position, but instead reflects internal problems (for instance, funding challenges or a change in direction). It may also indicate that there were no suitable candidates found, or not enough applications ...


29

I think that it would be unwise to include a copy of an offer in another application. But whether you inform them of the existence of an offer is a bit more subtle. I doubt that anyone will rush to hire you just because you have another offer. They will evaluate you on other things as usual. So, at best, mentioning the offer initially gets you nothing. ...


28

I'd mention it during an on-campus interview. In my department, we don't factor "the two-body problem" into an initial evaluation (i.e., do we bring someone for an on-campus interview). So it's up to you about mentioning it in a cover letter or not. I don't think I have ever read that in a cover letter in chemistry, though. During an on-campus interview, ...


28

Yes, but it is rare, for most schools. It is usually frowned upon, however, the top schools have to hire from somewhere so it is common for them to at least swap graduates. My anecdotal evidence is that low ranked universities also tend to hire a higher proportion of their own students. A notable exception is MIT, where 39% of the CS professors received ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible