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32

As a mostly theoretical physicist with some peripheral involvement in very large experimental collaborations, I asked essentially this question of an NSF program officer a couple years ago. The program officer said that, for now, it was not necessary to list all the members of huge experimental collaboration, only those that I had actually worked with ...


27

What you do is improve the proposal, so that the next time you submit it somewhere, the reviewers will not make the same kind of mistake. That's really all you can do. For proposals submitted to government agencies, there are generally formal appeals process, but those processes exist to protest against egregious conflicts of interest or other procedural ...


21

The document does not imply what you say. In a section "Potentially Disqualifying Conflicts of Interest" you can see that the NSF can issue waivers. This is typical. Conflicts of interests need to be reported when they reach a certain level, but they are not always automatically disqualifying. You might contact a program officer at a relevant NSF ...


19

It doesn't look amateurish. In most journals I know, the phrasing is not "this work was not supported by any funding" but rather "this research received no external funding". And it is a pretty common thing to disclose. At least in Germany, a lot of university PhD and other positions are funded through external grants. Any publication as ...


13

Your question seems misguided, it is not the research group that "handles" this conflict of interest. It's the funding body that will have to decide how to deal with potential conflicts of interest of their reviewers. To answer your question: the way large research groups "handle" this is by listing all their collaborators and co-authors ...


10

I think the purpose of (funded) research by undergraduates is to give the participants a taste of what real research mathematicians do: think in good company about interesting questions that no one yet knows how to answer. If a high quality paper (or any paper at all) comes out of this work, that's a big plus. But it's not how to measure the success of the ...


8

Overall, this would depend on the specific appeals procedures for the granting agency to which you applied for funding. I, personally, have only ever been involved with US NSF and Simons Foundation (either as an applicant or as a panelist/reviewer). In both these cases appeals based on disagreements with referee reports are not considered, e.g., NSF ...


7

IGDORE is based in Sweden and registered as a non-profit. From what they say the latter makes them eligible for certain Swedish and EU grants.


5

In my experience, most projects led by undergraduate students do not result in high-quality research papers, or even a paper at all. Undergraduate students can often work well under the frequent supervision of a graduate student, and I have seen many undergraduate students earn a second-author spot on a good paper. Some graduate students will be able to ...


4

Yes, travel grants belong there, in particular if there is no other field like "personal scholarships/stipendia" or similar. Also, you are probably overthinking this, as even if you find another more or less appropriate section and put your travel grant in both of them, it won't hurt you application chances in any way.


4

You're overthinking this, and in particular your concern that a lack of eligible reviewers would result in your application being tossed I think has the process the wrong way round. I don't work for NSF but I do work for a US funding agency. I don't know how NSF does it, but we are obligated to review compliant applications that are submitted. While the call ...


4

It looks amateurish to state that your work was not supported by anything. It is totally ok to just not say anything at all. Lots of papers are not supported by grants. That's likely also consistent with the journal requirements: the require you to list your sources of funding. The list just happens to be empty in your case.


2

No, it isn't reasonable to expect undergraduates to do high quality research on their own. They are too inexperienced and need to learn a lot about process as well as the topic of the research as they do. I think that funders recognize this and treat the funding as a kind of training, not a way to get the highest quality results. But, to manage the students ...


2

This is easy. You list your hundreds of collaborators as required. You can potentially go to jail for issues around this -- example: https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/01/us-charges-prominent-harvard-chemist-failing-disclose-china-ties -- and you need to avoid that. Be extra careful about making sure you get your foreign collaborators right. People are ...


2

I'm from a physical science field in the UK, so things could vary in different faculties. From my experience, new faculty at research intensive UK universities are usually required to apply for a New Investigator Grant during their first 3 years as part of their probation. Hiring committees will therefore be looking to see that you have plans which have a ...


1

For what purpose are you listing this? Is it your CV for your website, a job application, or something else? If this is a casual CV posting, then you can do whatever you like, and I've seen all sorts of things to make oneself unique. Funding agencies, at the other extreme, generally speaking, have pretty rigid formatting instructions (and often different ...


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