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151

Do not do this. At best, you will appear merely stingy; at worst, perhaps financially abusive. (I also suspect your university would not even allow it, but I think that's not as important because it should not be done anyways) I strongly, strongly advise you to reconsider how you think about students. It seems you are thinking about them like employees you ...


49

I'm not going to answer your career questions, but just the title whether universities are run like businesses: Over the past 20 years (with longer roots), universities have largely been stripped of the substantial state contributions that have financed operations before then. It used to be the fact that states funded the majority of university expenditures ...


23

In Sweden, non-government funding of universities is minor — whereas there is pressure to get external research grants, and some tuition fees (but only for students from non-EU countries), these factors haven't had much effect on what sort of courses are offered or what academic criteria are set. There is an ongoing discussion about worry that the general ...


20

You should ask your advisor. They will be able to tell you if your funding comes from a grant, and if so, they can give you the details you need to report (e.g. oftentimes a grant ID number is required). If indeed your funding is coming from a research grant, then it may very well be important to disclose this. Not only for the journal, but it may also be ...


17

I have to guess on this one, but can imagine that they haven't mentioned it because they haven't thought of it. I also imagine that they would be somewhat upset to learn of it unless you make provision for it in the grant application. The reason for my speculation is that few grantors are so rich that they don't much care how their, perhaps, limited funds ...


14

Not a good idea, and here's a take from a behavioral point of view, taken from this article In Haifa, Israel, there were a bunch of day care centers, about a dozen of them, and the kids came in the morning and the parents picked them up in the evening. And as is the case, some parents came late. And they decided that they were going to impose a fine on the ...


13

While it might sometimes be possible to convert the funding from a PhD to a postdoc position, in general I don't think it's a good idea to apply as a postdoc for a PhD position. That being said, you can always contact the PI and ask whether they would have another position for a postdoc. Often, there are many more projects advertised for prospective PhD ...


11

No, this is not a concern. Typically individuals who receive endowed professorships already have a long record of applying for grants. You could, as the donor, attempt to negotiate some other situation if you wished. Typically endowed professors only leave their job due to retirement or death. If you have really endowed the professorship with enough money,...


11

In the US, the job market is so terrible right now that it most likely will not be your choice. I would not be surprised if the number of tenure-track hires in pure mathematics in research universities in the US over the next year can be counted on my fingers. While the current situation is due to COVID-19, there is not much or a reason to expect the ...


9

As with many parts of becomes a group leader and teacher, this is just something you are expected to be able to do. I was never given any training, it was just expected that I was clever enough to work it out! "allocation rules, accounting rules, and can be audited to insure compliance too" is usually handled by central admin who are professional ...


9

Beware of setting targets. If you set a target, and an incentive for reaching it, then meeting that target becomes the most important thing. Graduate students should be doing research, writing papers and writing their thesis, in addition to the background reading. But if you pay them to read papers and write summaries, then that becomes the most important ...


8

The answer to this question will vary significantly based on the laws of your country, policies of your institution, and your contract with the grant funder. Although your profile specifies that you are not in the United States, some readers may find value in an answer specific to U.S. law and practice. I recognize this won't directly apply to you. Mea culpa ...


8

In theory it sounds fine, but I think you will encounter a number of practical problems. By paying for summaries you are incentivizing students to skim the paper and whip up a summary with minimal effort. I'll go ahead and assume your students are not so unethical as to hand you fake summaries, but I think it's evident that you will need to define quality ...


8

Let me focus on the headline question: Is a professor who's never had to write a grant application disadvantaged in the job market?. I'll leave aside your admirable intention to provide funding. To do their job, a professor needs many skills, but acquiring them takes time and effort. Not all of us are (in my case, were) excellent teachers or even researchers ...


6

You are massively mistaken in your assumptions. Generally, the experts know the rough reputation and standards of the publication venues in their area. If they are not familiar with a specific one, then looking at the recent papers and the editorial board, or asking colleagues will typically be preferred to a binary check of whether or not that venue is ...


5

Posting my comment as an answer. It probably refers to awards or prizes you may have been given over the course of your career, but if you're still uncertain it would be best to get in touch with Leverhulme and ask.


5

Where I'm from (Ontario, Canada), our current provincial government has implemented something of an outcomes-based evaluation of funding for university programs. This basically translates into "how many people get jobs once they graduate from your program", although it is more nuanced. In some sense this is frustrating and anti-academic, because ...


5

I'd argue that you're not funding them for the work they've already done, but to produce more of the lectures you found useful. So, why not enter into a conversation with the person making the talks directly about this? Ask them if there are upcoming talks they'd like to make, and then see if you can help fund the making of those. This would then be very ...


5

Does it make sense to apply for such a position even if you already have a PhD, in the hope that they might also consider a post-doc instead? Yes, in general, this makes sense, because there is a chance that the position can be converted into a postdoc position. Whether that's indeed the case will depend on the nature of the funding. In some cases it will ...


4

The other answers cover a lot of different perspectives which are quite important. I am not in academia any more but I have always closely watched the related issues. Firstly, try to understand, why the funding agency is funding you? What are their vision and specific purpose of this fund? Is it to help you as a new early-career researcher or is it to help ...


4

It seems implausible that your plan can work: You can't hope to draw more than 5% off an investment per year, so even a moderate income of $50k (or equivalent in your country) will require you to accumulate about a million dollars. It seems improbable that you will be able to sock away this much money in 5-6 years, post-taxes, unless you have a pre-tax ...


4

My experience may be anecdotal, but in my personal experience it is all learned informally during grad school and postdoc training. Many folks who eventually go on to become faculty win smaller grants (or even travel grants) during their postdoc time that give them a small amount of money to be in charge of. In China, where I'm most familiar with the money ...


3

By far the hardest part of managing funding is getting money in the first place. In order to get a meaningfully sized grant, you need to produce a fairly detailed budget, with good justifications for every kind of expenditure. However, once you have gotten good enough at preparing the budgets to land a grant, it is largely (and to some extent rightly) ...


3

It does not just effect the academic staff as support staff are cut. Workshops are closed and all the knowledge of how to make instrument/jigs is lost. Students could just go and discuss a job with a technician; they now have to create CAD drawings and get them made outside. The engineering company has no idea if they will work or not they just make to the ...


3

I would share my perspective, though I am not from humanities but from CS. Though you have multiple questions, the answer to all of them is actually fundamentally common. But before going into that, I do not know what index funds are and earning enough in IT in 5 years so that after proper investment, you can retire is an assumption, which with high ...


2

You don't have a scholarship (they're awarded by universities), you have a grant or an award, I'm unsure of the precise distinction, I suspect grant is more appropriate, since award suggests competition


2

From your description, there is too much overlap. One option is to figure out how to split off pieces of the project that can be done in parallel. I’ve currently got a CAREER award that focuses on a core theoretical topic, a standard NSF grant (with a collaborator) that focuses on how this theory interacts with non-ideal physics and measurement, and am part ...


2

If the errors are of a type easily caught by a spellchecker, it will look like you were careless. Everyone develops reading fatigue so repetitions of small words and/or forgetting some small words are usually not lethal. Making incomplete sentences is more worrisome. It is doubtful your application will be rejected because of small typos. If your project ...


2

Typos are always detrimental. Especially in a short submission they will stand out and broadcast to the reviewer that you are not careful or did not take the submission seriously enough. This is true in other areas as well. I vividly remember as a kid watching a friend's dad flip through resumes of job applicants for his company. He would immediately throw ...


2

Your institution (and specifically at the school level if you are organized into schools) will have rules about who can submit applications as a PI. It is generally accepted by NSF that if you have PI rights you can submit to their call as a PI, unless the solicitation requires you to hold a specific position or other qualifications. You should check with ...


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