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35

Generally, there is nothing wrong with sending e-mails to professors which demonstrate some interest in their research, also in Germany (where I work). It could help you get in contact with research groups you are interested in. However, it could also happen that you will get no response. One reason is that most students starting with a Master´s program ...


26

You might already know this, but just to be sure, keep in mind that the US and the German system are structured differently. In Germany, Master's and PhD are almost universally distinct, successive programs. I.e after you finish your Bachelor's, you apply for a Master's program, where after two years of coursework (and a small thesis at the end) you get ...


4

I wouldn't expect your degree in computing from three decades ago to have much impact on your application for a postgraduate degree. You can confirm by contacting a perspective university. (I doubt university websites will be particularly useful, since they probably won't consider your situation.)


3

IMHO you probably have the wrong impression of the master application workflow in Germany (which you already said might be the case) You are confusing two things: Enrolling in a program [as in "How to do it"] Finding a professor to do research with [If you're looking to see if a certain program is for you then ignore everything about point 1] For the ...


3

As Buffy's answer says, BSc in Physics, or its variants, are OK. However, if you want to have an official English equivalence of your title, ask to the student's office the Diploma Supplement, which is a bilingual document (Italian and English) aimed at better describing your academic qualifications in an international context, explaining also some details ...


3

If this is for formal use then state it exactly as it appears from your university and give any translation that is logically correct. But BS in Physics or BSc (Physics) or Bachelor of Science (Physics) or similar would all be universally recognized in the English speaking world. For informal usage (i.e. no legal implications whatever) then either of your ...


2

It seems as if you have done all you could. If they won't accept supplementary material, then they won't. I'm not sure about the comment on not reading letters, though. It seems like it would be a flaw in the system as long as the letters are in (readable) English. If you get past initial screening you can raise such thing in interviews or in future ...


2

Within the UK all degrees will have entry requirements for a course, and I expect this is the same throughout Europe although I suggest you check for yourself. As I dont know the exact situation for the entry, ie university or country, I will answer in general terms. Typical entry requrements are based on a progressive points system, where your previous ...


2

Anecdotal answer: I did pretty horribly in my first higher-level, bachelors mathematics courses, partly for health reasons and partly because I had never been challenged like that before. I also performed horribly the first year of graduate school (equivalent to first year of masters in Europe). I had to learn (not re-learn, but learn for the first time) ...


2

You raise a number of issues here and so this is only a partial answer. Generally, it is a bad idea to fight with an instructor. They set rules and you are pretty much required to follow them. Hopefully the instructor has reasons behind the rules, but normally they have the authority to enforce them in any case. So, in the case of having smartphones ...


2

In Europe, to be admitted to a Master's program, there are normally quite formal requirements. In particular, you need a Bachelor in a to-be-defined field. If your Bachelor is from another university, or in your case even another country, someone will have to approve its equivalence. That's usually not the professor's role (though their support might help ...


2

To make the answer formal, yes, you should ask him. This is best done in person, and one of the best approaches is just what you say here about his skill and your common interest in a topic. Let him know that you think he is the best person around to do this, and you won't have a problem, yourself, if he can't be at the graduation. What you need is his ...


2

I would suggest that you ignore the rankings from any general ranking site. They look at a lot of things that are probably not relevant to you. In particular, they are probably not focused on MS programs. Instead, look at the program you would be in and what are its offerings and its requirements. Look at the faculty in any specialty you are really ...


1

None of my first three (UK) degrees formally name the subject at all: Bachelor of Arts, Master of Science, Master of Arts. And in due course, I hope, my Doctor of Philosophy degree will be similarly silent (and I think it should be: why should research degrees be shoehorned into some librarian's classification system?). You just have to explain in your CV ...


1

It is a bit risky to cite papers having seen only the abstract. You might be able to contact the original authors in some cases for more complete versions. But, the safe and approved way to get access to papers that aren't easily available online, or available only by conflicting with with ethical considerations, is to go to your local library and ask the ...


1

To be accepted in any masters program, you're going to need at least one professor that will look at your application and say "yes, I'd like to supervise this student". Normally, the admissions committee would be inspired by letters of recommendation from your undergrad profs, but in your case you'd be better off with letters from your current employer ...


1

There are some options in the UK, such as the Open University. I'm also interested in learning more about History, and found some interesting looking courses at the University of Oxford's Continuing Education department. Perhaps you, and future courses you apply to, would be able to gauge your interest and ability if you did one or more of these modules. ...


1

(1) To what extent should I describe this implementation also in the thesis? For example: Should I mention what programming language I used? Should I have any actual code in there? Your thesis should demonstrate that you have satisfied the (marking) criteria. I'll elaborate if you provide that criteria. (2) Should I describe analytic geometry, i.e. well-...


1

We cannot update submitted applications with new SOP or CV or other information. Unfortunately, this means that you will not be able to update your application due to the regulations of admission. Thus, overthinking it will not help but to make you uncomfortable. Regarding to your situation, there are two possible scenarios I can think of: The ...


1

There is a power dynamic in the application process that any applicant needs to be conscious of. There are only a small number of positions for a large number of applicants, which grows to be a very large number at elite institutions. In other words, there is a significant power imbalance to the detriment of the applicant. The consequence of this is that ...


1

A PhD is just vocational training for researchers, so if a company is not looking for a researcher then the PhD should be a disadvantage; you are not going to hire a carpenter if you want a plumber. In practice, it is a bit more complicated because the PhD has the undeserved stigma as "highest" level of education. So a PhD could still get an advantage even ...


1

Harvard University uses SM for its Master of Science degrees. Please see https://www.seas.harvard.edu/news/2017/06/harvard-launches-data-science-masters-degree-program.


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