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33

One possibility is that if you did want to do a PhD later on, you'll find it much harder to get back into a one if you dropped out of one already. Also, I've found there are usually many more positions available for master's students than PhD students at a University. For a Masters's, space is usually limited by space in lecture halls, while PhD's are hard ...


17

I suspect that there are a lot of factors. One is that there are a lot of universities in the US that have masters programs, but no doctoral program. Some of their masters students just continue on from a bachelors at the same place. A second factor is that there are more needs out there for education and "mad skilz" than you might expect. Programs ...


11

Professors do much more than just teach. Their job mostly consists of research, and a PhD is in fact a bare minimum requirement for a position as an assistant professor. It is expected that person has published significant work in their field, for instance. If you get a PhD in a foreign language, you don't just spend the whole time learning how to speak the ...


10

I just retired and started an MS program. Why didn't I apply to the Ph.D. program? Admission to the local Ph.D. program is highly competitive. The MS program, not so much. The requirements for the MS degree are not onerous, no prelims, no qualifiers, I only have to find one other referee besides my final project advisor, i.e. no putting together a thesis ...


7

Consider the example of Stanford. It is significantly easier to get into the MS program there than the Ph.D. program. So, if you can only get admitted to the MS program, and think it will help your career enough to be worth the money, then you might choose that route. I think companies will sometimes pay for all or part of a master's degree. Other ...


6

In addition to the other answers: People pay for expensive masters degrees because they have been tricked by clever university marketing. This is the same as other expensive unnecessary purchases, like oversized, inefficient vehicles. Many people think you have to pay for a PhD. Many masters programs exist only to generate revenue.


6

While you have to cite every source that you reference properly, you defenitely don't have to discuss every source in the literature review. Some sources you cite might only be needed for little things like an equation, a standard used for testing, or a confirmation of an hypothesis you make, market projections, single statistical results, etc. Other sources ...


5

Just going to add another perspective here for people pursuing a masters degree while working. It may be more financially advantageous to pay for a Masters instead of quitting for a year to work on a PhD. Just to give an example, let's say I'm offered a $33k/yr stipend to pursue a PhD. One option would be to quit my job to get a PhD, but drop out after a ...


3

You’re overthinking this. If an academic position description says that a PhD is required, then a PhD is, well, required. Your friend does not qualify, sorry.


2

First, don't expect a hard boundary between the two concepts. It is a matter of more or less of one or the other. So, the "exactly" in your title can only be approximated. While research in industry is now only occasionally anything beyond product research, it wasn't always that way. Some places still do research much like is done in academia. And ...


1

I am not sure if using sir/madam is usual in France. That's Indian subcontinental style. Usually, in western countries, supervisors are addressed as Dr. . So, first of all, I would ask you to make sure of this thing. In the first paragraph, instead of saying France has lots of researchers, I would say more about the institution and/or the supervisor. This ...


1

For smarter peoples, getting into a PhD program with the intention to leave with a Master's degree (MPhil maybe?) is, simple put, not profitable. We're not even considering the fact that PhD positions are scarce and require significant devotion and perseverance to. PhD programs usually spans across 5 years or more, and it's rare that you can "quit as ...


1

It's not bad at all That sounds like a nice piece of research to me. You tried a new method to do something, and found out it doesn't work as well as the existing methods. Useful stuff. Write up your results and be honest about the outcome; see if you can explain/hypothesise why your new method didn't work as well as you were hoping. That research will ...


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