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9

It sounds like you need to consider three distinct issues: Trade secrets / copyright: Is the data truly yours to publish? I am not a lawyer, but depending on location, type of employment and contracts / NDAs you may have signed, the simple fact that you took the readings and acquired the data might not make you legal copyright holder. What you may need - ...


6

Email your supervisor: Ask them whether they'd like to co-author a paper derived from your thesis. Move forwards from there. You needn't write the paper before getting your supervisors input. You should ask for guidance whilst writing the paper. I have the option to publish it without naming my supervisor or the organization. Actually, you don't. ...


4

I agree with @Buffy's comment. As a retired professor, he might have little incentive or capacity to take on a new student, which means making sure there are enough funding, guidance, as well as lab space and equipment, etc. However, he might refer you to a suitable professor and help you as a co-advisor in the long term. This is what usually retired ...


4

In my experience, it will have minor to none implications. Job interviews barely talk about failed exams, if they even pose a question about your studies at all, they focus on what you put your focus on. You could check your Pr├╝fungsordnung or get in touch with the Studienb├╝ro, if they actually include the amount of failed attempts in your Abschlusszeugnis. ...


4

This is a peculiar situation. Your supervisor did not honor your agreement, but at this point she has nothing to gain from continuing to be involved with your thesis, and being angry about that isn't going to help you in any way. Realistically, do not expect any more input from her, and move on. Getting someone else to look at your thesis could be useful, ...


4

First off, no - this is not okay or normal. Advisors should meet their advisees on a regular basis. I'd say every other week is the boundary of reasonable (unless of course there are other circumstances like sickness, parental leave, long vacation or sabbatical etc.). While there are mitigating circumstances (this is 2020 after all), your advisor has a ...


4

I think your potential writer (1) gave you good advice: look for a professor first. However, if they can write a strong letter for you then certainly it's better than nothing; your second choice may not actually be a choice if they never respond. I think if you were submitting at least 3 letters of recommendation, it would be less of an issue for one of them ...


3

X attended with me class A (grade A), class B (grade B), [...] and class E (grade E). Or your preferred variation of the above. However, you can also repeat the grade statement several times, possibly adding for each class details about the student's participation.


3

I e-mailed her 4-5 times in February-March and got no reply. If she did not reply to your e-mails or otherwise advise you when she was technically your advisor, why would she reply to them now that you have graduated? I think she has effectively ended your relationship. I do not know whether she had good reason for this or if she is just lazy, but either ...


3

You will, as you say, need to omit redundant sources and severely limit or omit unreviewed sources. With those caveats, more is generally better as more research suggests more learning. Yes, professors notice. However, your paper must include your own thoughts and analysis. A cut-and-paste paper, where every sentence includes a citation, is not plagiarism,...


3

I would ask them now if they could imagine writing a letter, either now (outlining the reasons why they took you as a student), or close to Dec 1st. But I would phrase it in a way where it is clear that you don't expect them to do it, since they don't know you well yet. This way, your prospective supervisor can choose whatever they prefer - either they are ...


2

Here's just an outside impression. It doesn't look good to me that your motivation, your love for your subject, is affected by the fact that most students around you are weaker. Actually this is a situation in which "the best" regularly are, just by being the best. And if they are really the best, it will not drag them down. Why do you even care ...


2

I love it when seminar talks give you a good sense of the line of reasoning in the literature that led to the question at hand, and when their research appears to be in conversation with other work. Though I've seen plenty that don't really do this much (and just give the standard broad intro that doesn't do more than say what all the things they are going ...


1

If your goal is to work in the software industry, then a thesis on that subject would be more helpful than one on electronics. And vice versa: if your long term goal is to work in electronics, then a software-oriented thesis isn't as helpful. That doesn't mean it's not helpful at all. Anyone completing a master's degree is showing that they're smart and ...


1

If your advisor is happy and the local job market is aligned, then do which ever you want. For longer term goals it might be different. But your employability is probably determined by what you have done recently.


1

they have no restriction intakes , Why they do that ? Caveat: I'm in germany and in a STEM field. Many European countries have rather open admission systems for university, in particular if the program is not overcrowded. These programs in turn tend to have high failure rates at exams. The philosophy behind this is that everyone should get their chance, ...


1

In general the answer to the question would be yes, and many people do so, both by staying at the same institution and by changing universities. But there are caveats. It probably isn't the norm, and there may be local traditions, say in Brazil, that suggest it is a poor idea. But you would probably already know if that were true. There are many reasons to ...


1

It's all about time management my friend. You need to learn how to adapt and the first step to start adapting is to set your timing schedule. A time schedule for the day with clear tasks, for the week..etc. You need to start working out or at the very least walk/squat for 5 minutes from time to time while you are doing a task for every 30 minutes, it will ...


1

A Master's in Mathematics is presumably what is necessary for a PhD in Statistics (check with universities you'll apply to): There's no need to switch. It'll cost time and money. Instead, change the classes you'll take as soon as possible. Bureaucrats are looking to tick-boxes: They'll presumably be looking for a undergraduate-, postgraduate-degree, or both ...


1

There are a lot of issues here. Whether you get good letters from maths professors is up to them and your relationship with them. Only they can answer that, so you might pose the question to them. Not writing the thesis may impact on that, but only they can say. As to whether a switch gives you any advantage in application to a US doctoral program, it also ...


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