Hot answers tagged

11

Do not mention anything related to the master thesis being flawed or of poor quality. It is supposed to be a degree rather than a big contribution. The situation would vary depending on the selection procedures. Perhaps nobody will even have a glance at it, especially if you have already two papers. Those would be probably scrutinised in more details, or at ...


9

Since you have been less than perfect in research so far, it is imperative that you only apply to graduate programs where your work will be judged by people with imperfect research histories. Lucky for you, that describes everyone. No need to dwell on or emphasize past work that you can imagine improving on. If you have interviews you can be prepared to talk ...


7

I meet with my supervisor nearly every week This sounds like a good level of engagement. Some people may prefer more frequent contact, some may prefer less (and it may vary by stage of a project), but I'd say "nearly every week" is a pretty solid middle ground. Whenever I ask the supervisor on things I don’t understand they never have an answer ...


6

I can't answer for pure maths, as that is not my field, so what I say might not apply there I guess, but a PhD is a PhD. The first thing to note is that formal examinations and theses test very different things. The test at the end of a PhD is a thesis, not a formal exam (in the sit down and take a paper sense). Thus, your performance in a thesis is more ...


6

Actually, it might be essential to do so. Especially if you draw on or extend their work. You need to cite anything you use, of course. Moreover, a literature review, if it is to be complete may need to draw on things that are "visible" even if not formally published. You may, however, need to make it clear that some such things haven't been peer ...


4

Questions along the lines of "what goes where" in a thesis, especially a master's thesis, have a standard, simple answer: ask your supervisor. This is because there are many, many different conventions for writing master's theses, even within the same discipline, even within the same institution, so all that practically matters is whatever is ...


2

If the thesis is relevant, then yes, you can certainly include it. If the thesis disseminates important and original findings on the topic you are surveying, then you should definitely include it. I once read a peer-reviewed book-chapter by a professor that cited a master's thesis (the thesis was neither by the professor himself nor by a superstar).


2

Given that a start up is a business and your education is elsewhere, it would probably do you well to get some specific knowledge of business and the regulations that typically govern business. An MBA might be appropriate if it is focused on entrepreneurship. Economics is probably not what you want, being a more theoretical course of study. Marketing might ...


1

You are assuming that TurnItIn makes a decision on plagiarism. It just finds sub-strings of a submission in other publications. Their existence might be indicative of plagiarism, but it is subject to human interpretation. I cannot guarantee that some instructor would not look beyond a TurnItIn score, but I with many other professors would not think such ...


1

Since you clarified that the "official topic" is research and career progression, I would just let it come up naturally. After you have clarified your general interest in the topic and in doing a PhD., there is an ideal spot for something like: "But of course, before I can do that, I need to finish my master's here by writing a thesis. I ...


1

Since, the literature review part is to give the reader a clear understanding of the field that you're working in. It is however required that within the literature review part, you do provide the pre-requisites of the subject you're targeting (so that you can maintain coherence among the sections). Therefore, that's where the theory part would fit-in I ...


1

Speaking for the milieu familiar to me, mathematics in the U.S. (probably some people would label the work I do as "pure", as opposed to "applied", despite its applications... but, nevermind, let's go with the cliched labels... I'm well acquainted with them, as inaccurate and misleading as they may be.) And, having been on grad admissions ...


1

Ian Sudbery's answer is excellent, but here's something more. A general aspect is that students tend to think that things are learnt by being told. This runs counter to most educational research. Discovering things for yourself as required while working with a bigger scope (thesis topic) and applying them in turn with more freedom to make own decisions is ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible