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23

This seems more like they have a need for someone to start at some date certain and that the MS needs to be completed prior to that. My suggestion, if you are worried about whether they think you are being honest with them is to put them in touch with your advisor who can give them assurance about your progress. I suggest this since you seem to be having ...


12

What kind of graduate program are you trying to get into? In pure mathematics and many parts of applied mathematics and theoretical computer science, no one cares about author order, and the convention is that authors are listed alphabetically. So, I’m not entirely sure, but I think you may have some misconceptions about the reasons for your advisor’s ...


10

The following is obviously an educated guess, so you have to be the judge whether it fits all the information you have: Your examiners found something of serious concern in your thesis. This could be potential plagiarism, data manipulation, etc. Otherwise they wouldn’t go through such extreme measures and wouldn’t have cancelled the defence already. The ...


9

No, I would not recommend getting a recommendation from a former student. You want recommenders who are familiar with you and are familiar with the requirements to do well in whatever you are applying for. In this case, professors who teach graduate students and who have taught you in the past will be able to make statements about how you compare to the ...


6

Sure, of course it does, at least on the margins. If they have one spot and two nearly identical applications save for that detail, they will probably go for the one with an accepted thesis. Now, it's pretty rare to actually have nearly two identical candidates, usually there are pros and cons to each and in the end it is a judgement call that can't be fully ...


5

After some decades of naively thinking that the point of an exam was the exam itself ... I've finally realized that the largest point is to give students a motivation to study/review/think. So the point is that the student knows, in advance, that questions will be asked. And that not being able to respond will be, at least, an embarrassment. So the student ...


4

Often there will be a committee, and not just one professor asking questions. In some institutions, any faculty member can attend and ask questions. The principal reason is to be sure you do understand the concepts you have presented, which has the added effect of reassuring them that you actually did write the thesis. They may also probe for broader, more ...


4

I don't have a truly similar situation, but it seems that something has come up. Something that needs to be dealt with seriously. One case I know of was parallel work leading to two very similar doctoral theses, presented simultaneously, answering an important question. The plagiarism question naturally arises. In this case it was worked out satisfactorily ...


4

Generally speaking, the purpose of a seminar is to "disseminate knowledge". Now, depending on which kind of knowledge is being "disseminated", there can be two types of seminars: research seminars and teaching seminars. Regardless of their type, seminars can be beneficial for two distinct groups: the presenter and the audience. Research ...


2

You are correct that seminar is often used for discussing research progress and looking for new approaches to research, but the term isn't universally used in that way. It can also mean a somewhat less formal course in which the students in the seminar present key elements related to the topic of the "seminar". The professor is there to evaluate ...


2

Unfortunately you are in a bad place, but you have to make the best use of the resources that you have available. I don't think that using a professor from a different institution is necessarily bad, provided that they can honestly predict your future success. You might also talk to the Head and see if there is something they can suggest. They have a ...


2

First: good for you for stepping back and thinking about what you really want to do. To answer your actual question, you can apply anywhere for any program that seems interesting. Whether you're admitted depends on many factors. Some programs might find your background a reason for acceptance, some the opposite. Whether you need financial assistance will ...


2

You are worried about why they did not explain the matter in the email. Actually, this is for your advantage. If there is a problem and if they explain it in the email, that makes the problem official. If they haven't explained in the email, that means they haven't made up their mind about how to deal with the problem yet. I sense compassion, and opportunity ...


1

It could be a good experience, as you are more independent, and thus has to take more responsibility. However, as the advisor is less familiar with the field, it is crucial that you do a thorough literature review first, to ensure that the problem you are trying to solve has not already been solved. Also, note that after a PhD, you are very likely (expected, ...


1

Your research background is definitely suitable for a PhD, even with your GPA (and being top 20% of your class is still a good thing), especially since you have publications. Assuming you plan to apply to schools in the US, I'm not sure what a 7.5/10 would equate to. This may be something worth asking prospective advisors at the schools that you apply to. ...


1

There could be many reasons as to why your advisor wants to be listed as the first author, i.e. for reasons of funding. There may also be certain conventions to consider here, e.g. that a prof. is expected to be listed as the main author, or that alphabetical order is used generally. The bottom line of what I am trying to say is that there may be very good ...


1

I can't know what the practice is at your particular university, but that kind of public presentation is common. Other faculty and students may be invited, and may come. The forum gives the student a chance to explain to the audience what they wrote about, what they learned, and why it's important and interesting. Unless there is some doubt about the ...


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