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6

I think that is pretty unlikely, as long as the professor is honest in what they say. I'm assuming, of course, that these letters go to various places, not all the same. But, if everyone is applying to the same university and gets the same letter, few will succeed. But that is at least partly because the number of open slots is limited. I think this should ...


2

It's fine for the professor to use an email address and letterhead from the college where the professor works now.


2

This is location-dependent, as education systems vary widely across different countries in Europe. For example: in Germany, taking an extra semester to do internships, research work or stays abroad is quite common, and is generally seen as positive if the experience acquired was good. In my experience, grades are more important than the time taken to ...


2

Usually there is a scheduled time and an expected number of credits for a degree. A BSc normally takes 4 years, with a given number of classes. This is because the ability to absorb the material in the allotted time is part of the evaluation of the student. Ordinarily that is. But you mention health issues. If you had some major life altering illness then ...


2

While a professor would be better, a lecturer should be fine, especially if they hold a doctorate. You want letters from people who know you well enough to make a prediction about your future success, and so a lecturer with whom you have interacted may be a good choice. The letters need to speak both about your past accomplishments and about your potential ...


1

Unfortunately I expect this is a mistake on the university's part. Many people apply for postdocs in the final year of their PhD, so perhaps they misinterpreted your CV and thought you were in that category. There is likely to be a requirement in the formal job description that candidates must have, or be near to completing a PhD, so even if you were to ...


1

In engineering, the two most important skills are: The ability to sit and think about a problem. The ability to calculate. You can get very far with just being able to calculate, as that is often a major stumbling block for many engineers. In other words, they have good ideas but can't formulate a corresponding mathematical problem or solve it. Go find ...


1

There is no reason to panic. A 1.x grade in Bachelor is good. Master's programs in Germany in Electrical Engineering tend to be less mathematically heavy that Bachelor's. They also tend to leave you enough free time, which some students use to work for money and you can use it to revise the basics in Mathematics and Physics. You do not need to start from ...


1

I've personally encountered this problem before, albeit in one of projects for my engineering PhD (which I haven't completed so take this with a grain of salt). What worked for me was to actively poke around the current topic and try to find a new direction which has a reasonable connection with the original thesis topic while still being appealing to me. ...


1

This is certainly a question you need to explore with your supervisor. What they would accept or recommend is certainly important. What an experienced researcher would do is one of the following, maybe both. First, they would be likely to consult with colleagues (not unlike your supervisor) and explore viable alternatives. But, assuming that they have a ...


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