New answers tagged

0

should I look for other papers that have same information and are available That too; but it doesn't replace reading the actual paper you're citing. Something else you could do is contact the authors and ask for a copy of the paper. or can I use sci-hub. Yes, I suggest you use SciHub. ... how fair is it to use sci-hub? It is morally and ethically ...


9

Note the inconsistency. The exact way of doing this will depend on the style or publication guide you are using. This idea comes from the APA Style Blog, where Timothy McAdoo suggests noting an unintentional typo using a footnote: Linn, L. (1968). Social identification and the seeking of pyschiatric1 care. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 38, 83–88. ...


12

Without sufficient reputation, I cannot post this as a comment; so here we go in an answer... I apologise! 'Beweis einer Baudetschen Vermutung' is orthographically incorrect, as 'Baudetschen' is an adjective and should therefore be written using a lowercase 'b' as 'baudetschen'. If this adjective, however, is derived from a name, it can be written as 'Baudet'...


2

For a research manuscript with a digital object identifier (DOI), associated metadata may provide a title. Alternatively, and for research manuscripts without DOIs, a publisher's table of contents, index, etc. may provide a title. The actual title assigned by the author(s) may differ, and a publisher's usage may vary, hence, there's no "official" ...


1

APA 7th ed. says use both dates. 1996/1999. Do this for works (same edition) that have been reprinted, republished, reissued, or translated. Check your style manual. As you know, the purpose of the reference is to (1) credit the originator of the idea, and (2) provide enough information that readers can locate the source information. One of the reasons for ...


1

The following online solution is (currently) free: https://reciteworks.com/check From the website: Recite checks that your in text citations match the reference list at the end of your work. Recite is optimised for those who use APA or Harvard referencing styles. Recite may be of most use to those who don't use reference management software like Endnote or ...


2

You will need to speak to your advisor about this matter, but if the paper is relevant to your research (and it certainly sounds like it is) then you are correct in your view that it should be incorporated into your thesis. If one week is insufficient to do this, I recommend you seek an extension for submission from your supervisory panel. It should not be ...


0

When was the paper released? If it is very new (few months old), then maybe it won't be considered a big mistake. (because it is "just" a thesis) But the evaluation of the whole thing depends on how strict your supervisor is. So ask them. Question: is there any minor difference in the hypothesis/experiment design between your thesis and the paper? ...


1

This is up to your advisor and any committee that is involved in accepting the thesis and or the completion of your degree. "Only four citations" doesn't sound like a good thing, however. If I were on your committee I would wonder whether this is parallel work, and hence fine, or if you should have seen this paper a while ago and adapted to it. It ...


1

If your Statement of Purpose is self-contained (in particular, it includes a list of references), you're free to pick your own citation format. Otherwise, you need to pick a format that allows the reader to identify the work you're citing. Using first author et al. probably doesn't help, because that author will likely have written many papers, moreover, ...


1

I don't see anything special. A caption fitting the journal style but saying something like "taken from fig. 2e in ref #" seems perfect to me. You are not cropping the subfigure. But even in that case, and even if the figure would be data, you just add "spectrum, plot, whatever cropped" from.... Obviously what you let out should not ...


0

Image manipulation becomes problematic when one can judge them as fabrication (that is, the data visualised were actually never obtained through the methods you describe) or as falsification (whereby crucial information are lost) [1]. It follows that 'beautifying' an image to make them more reader-friendly (e.g. by changing colors) or to add valuable hints (...


0

APA guidelines state adding the phrase "Adapted from". The relevant example shows: General Format 1 (Figure from a Book): [Figure] Note: Descriptive phrase that serves as title and description. Reprinted [or adapted] from Book Title (page number), by Author First Initial. Second Initial. Surname, Year, Publisher. Copyright [Year] by the Name of ...


1

I actually disagree that you should always cite the original source for exactly the reasons you give. Each subsequent paper provides additional context that can help the reader understand the importance of an idea. But it should be clear to a reader who originated the idea even if you cite a later work. "Master Kwan originated the idea of ... as is ...


1

Traditionally, PhD theses constitute a public proof of your abilities and therefore need to be published. (This is certainly true in the places in Europe I know, but a quick search revealed e.g. the same for Harvard, and I assume it is true for more US places as well). The traditional way of this publication process would be to print a certain number of ...


1

When I submitted the article to the journal, I mentioned in a cover letter that the same results/algorithms exist in my PhD dissertation. The editor made a mistake. Very probably an automated plagiarism check was performed without viewing the cover letter or examining the type of document the plagiarism check located. The editor thought your dissertation ...


-4

You could try pre-printing it and citing the preprint. Benefits are short time to `publication' (a couple of days, maximum, and only on a weekend) so very short delay to resubmission, moreover, the citation still counts for h-indices etc. I am sure that arXiv does theses as I have definitely read some there. A proper citation could simply be a sentence like `...


12

In my experience (Theoretical Computer Science/Mathematical Logic) this issue is typically handled by having the sentence "This article is based on Chapter X of the author's PhD thesis \cite{myThesis}." as a stand-alone paragraph at the end of the introduction section. Having just the plain sentence is consistent with the article having been edited ...


6

If the dissertation is "published" then cite it like any other work. Otherwise cite it by name and authors and mark the citation as (doctoral dissertation, U of the Universe, unpublished). It might only take a note or a short paragraph somewhere to explain how the present paper is related to the dissertation. "Builds" was just boilerplate....


3

Across most of the social sciences, the answer would be: No, the published manuscript should not cite its own pre-print. The pre-print is rather considered a draft version that happens to have circulated prior to its acceptance at a journal, where it transforms into its final version. This seems to be grounded in the paradox of the published preprint being ...


2

Even if its in the public domain its always good to cite where you get your information from, be that data, images, or whatever, even if its public domain When I use images that are governed by a license (including public domain, and "fair use") I identify the source, the original author/photographer/painter/etc, and the specific license that ...


13

No, you should NOT include this information. These designations are journal-specific and would provide little information to someone not familiar with each of the journal's classification schemes. For example, a short communication in one journal might represent a more impressive paper (because for some journals a very short paper might be, on average, more ...


6

No. The citation guides I know of do not distinguish between types of published contents in journals. They simply use the overarching term of an "Journal Article" (e.g. APA) and do not require one to note whether it's an Editorial, a Review, a Research Article or Short Communication (or whatever of the ca 45 labels there are - possibly with the ...


5

In my field, there is no distinction. Short and long papers are cited the same way. However this may vary by field. To find out if it is important to your specific field, read papers in your field. Do they make any distinction when citing? For example, after you've written your manuscript, take a look at all of the references you cited. How do they cite ...


10

I recommend using "peer-reviewed" rather than "published" for a paper on arXiv (or otherwise on the internet), because such papers are literally published, in the sense of being publicly available (even more than those behind pay-walls). The distinction that may matter is peer-reviewed (or not). The question of whether peer-reviewed ...


14

There is nothing wrong with citing paper, reviews, etc., which have appeared on the arxiv (and only on the arxiv). Go ahead and cite the paper. (If your paper gets accepted at a journal, they might ask you to update in case the paper has been published in a journal in the meantime, but in the fields where the arxiv is commonly used, journals and referees ...


-2

You can cite everything that you want, including arXiv contributions. However, you might want to look for alternatives. In case of review/overview articles you often will be able to find some and use them instead without risking plagiarism. In academia, peer review is the standard way to make sure a paper meets the necessary quality criteria, so peer ...


8

If you use the work and you found it only on arXiv then you must cite it there (or elsewhere) to avoid plagiarism. But, the publication process takes a long time. I suggest that you cite what you have found, especially if the paper isn't formally published yet and watch for it to appear. If it is ever going to appear it may well show up before your paper is ...


-3

The answer is a definitive YES. We live in the information age and fully connected to the internet 24/7, where everything is a web link address. One may ask the question differently: the web address is long and ugly. In such cases, the writer should try to find a more standard and commonly used address link. For instance, use links of type DOI when ...


1

Short answer: Because this is not yet a thesis or scientific publication, you may be able to cite websites instead of papers and books (your Q1 question). Other answers have already discussed the format of citing a webpage (Q2), and there are a few related questions on academia.stackexchange.com. However, there is also the long answer: You should try very, ...


5

The general rule for such things is that if you use the work of others for things not commonly known, then you must cite them. So, yes, cite web pages as needed and quote, formally, from them also when needed. But cite them even if you paraphrase things. You also probably need to do more than just include a list of references at the end of the paper. The ...


-1

You should cite any source of information. So yes, you cite web pages. Whether you should follow links on those pages to primary sources is a question for your instructor. Your bibliography software may suggest a format. If none i s given, provide the title of the page, the author (if appropriate), the url and the date when you last visited it.


3

From my experience: Q1: Include it as a regular reference (like an article) and if you find a published paper then exchange it. At our department we followed this strategy and published also our papers with references to websites. Also I personally do not like this strategy, it seems inevitable in some cases. Be careful to include only really meaningful ...


1

If you really want to write such a general statement: Look at the statement and think about what it means. The references should provide evidence that the statement is indeed true. So in your example, you need a selection of references that show that "Gaussians are widely used in mathematics & statistics" (sorry, it is as simple as that). This ...


15

Either none at all if you can assume that the most likely audience of your publication is aware of that as if it was a basic fact of life. Or recent reviews that provide a wide overview of Gaussians used in mathematics and/or statistics. I searched for TITLE: (Gaussian) AND DOCUMENT TYPES: (Review) AND YEAR PUBLISHED: (2015-2021) in Web of Science. The query ...


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