New answers tagged

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If your full name, or initials with last name is common in your field, there might be some inconvenience. But otherwise I doubt that uniqueness has much value. I share a full name with another prominent researcher but in an entirely different field. It is sort of funny when the search turns up both of us, but it is obvious that we are different people. ...


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Seems like relatively easy problems to solve. How do you compare the quality of two researchers when they are in different fields of research? Are there any other means to evaluate the quality of research? Compare to the median in their field. For example, search up the metrics of ~10-20 researchers in the first field and calculate their median h-index. ...


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Reliance on any single index has many confounds. And these flaws are amplified when you attempt to compare academics across disciplines. That said, there are more thoughtful ways to make use of metrics. Here are some of the main things that should temper your use of h-index: Proportion of first-author or lead-author papers (e.g., 1st, 2nd, last author): All ...


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Usually, web sources have an author and a publication/creation date as well. These you can add in-text, and then put Author, Year, Title, website and retrieval date in the reference list.


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How to cite browsing the list of bibtex entry types, we find: masterthesis A thesis written for the Master’s level degree. @mastersthesis{CitekeyMastersthesis, author = "Jian Tang", title = "Spin structure of the nucleon in the asymptotic limit", school = "Massachusetts Institute of Technology", year = 1996, ...


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Should I Cite the Book from which I read the Chapter ? Yes, doing otherwise is surely plagiarism. If Yes, Then How ?, Because the Topics would be Spread over a Range of Pages. You could open with: The following paraphrases A, B & C 1. I know about Research Papers that this will be Considered as Basic Knowledge and Would'nt be cited. The phrase Basic ...


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Assuming it isn't formally published, then the citation would probably include the university instead of the publisher. Otherwise the same. Links are always a problem since they are subject to disappearance. It is good to also include the date that you last referenced it there with any link(s). And yes, you need to cite it to avoid various plagiarism issues.


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Plagiarism is one thing, and I support your view on this situation as paraphrasing data. But a more important reason to add a citation is to let the reader know where the data is coming from (and how the data was collected). This is immensily important for the reader to understand and analyse your presented data correctly. In my mind, we should always write ...


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Section 12.18 of APA 7 states: To write a copyright attribution, state whether the material was reprinted or adapted (use "From" for reprintings and "Adapted from" for adaptations); provide the title, author, year of publication, and source of the material; indicate the material's copyright status...; and provide the permission ...


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Just to add a little to the other answers (which are good): don't worry about it! As long as you cite at least one relevant source (the one you directly used) you have a lot of leeway as to which historical papers to cite. I like to do a couple things: Think about who might review your paper and cite them. You can even recommend them as a reviewer. Cite an ...


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Have you ever looked at NIST Refprop? I think they offer options to incorporate this purchase package into other software. I am not sure the specific properties you are looking for would be included though.


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You can have work under multiple licenses on a single repository Typically each file would have its own copyright heading, and on your LICENSE or COPYRIGHT file you would state "Project Foobar. All files under src are copyright 2020 by Alf, available under MIT license (see file MIT-License.txt). Contents of dataset folder are made by NIST, published at ...


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Their copyright page seems fairly clear to me. It even goes into what to do if you create derivative works based on it. That said, best practice would be to include the download as part of the code. Most platforms have the ability to retrieve a url, for example, if the data is available that way. Also, note that Github is not really intended to store ...


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Definitely no. I think you know this, but for the benefit of future readers of this post: The purpose of a citation is not to provide a diary of the author's thought process, but rather to acknowledge the prior work done before yours and trace the logic and evidence from which your work follows. It helps no one to know what story you were reading, or whether ...


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I only fully realized how the article’s thesis related to its conclusion while I was in the middle of reading one story...However, it wouldn’t make sense to reference the story in my review, since I didn’t take any information from it, correct? You needn't cite the story, but you could mention it in the acknowledgements, especially if the story hinted at ...


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Let me reframe your question somewhat, in a way that hopefully leads to a helpful answer. It is widespread to think that the purpose of the "literature review" section of an article is to describe "the state of the art of the field, to give a background and show familiarity with related works", as you say. But I would argue that that even ...


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For your readers, not important. Very often, later reports or review articles are better than the first report in terms of clarity and completeness. If you did not even need to read that first report when doing your research, then probably your readers do not need it either. For the academic career game, mildly important. Depending on the field of research, ...


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Google Scholar might show the two versions as separate articles, but you have the option to merge them in your profile. While merging, you get an option "Select the best version of the article.". So, selecting the newer version here should ensure that the correct arXiv version is linked to. Citations also get merged when merging articles. It is ...


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I got an answer from APA Style on twitter. They say to use the group name that appears in the byline, and make sure to capitalize "Writers". Source: https://twitter.com/Zupancia/status/1309502673406881792


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Uproot and Awkward Array both have Zenodo badges, which link to a page that has a lot of ways to cite the software (copy-paste to BiBTeX, etc.) awkward-array uproot The papers are conference proceedings that emphasize different things, not all of which are the software itself. (One of them covered user feedback in a series of interviews, very different ...


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You can cite the paper using the arxiv number and add a link to the github repo in a footnote. As a basic example: Methodology In this work, we make use of the uproot package* for array calculations [1]. * www.github.com/scikit-hep/uproot Bibliography [1] Pivarski et al., "Awkward Arrays in Python, C++, and Numba", arxiv: 2001.06307


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I would citate it like this: J. Pivarski et al. *Awkward Arrays in Python, C++, and Numba. CHEP 2019 proceedings, Jul. 2020. However, this is the publication place where it is supposed to be published but not very sure about it. However, it should work for other academics to find the paper.


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