New answers tagged

1

If I understood correctly, you are using a certain piece of software that allows you to read papers. If this is the case, you can cite the paper just as you would if you had read it via another source (e.g. online, or even the print version). For example, it's not necessary to cite Google Chrome or Adobe Acrobat Reader every time you view a pdf using one of ...


2

Sorry, currently you cannot...


3

By my understanding:* You've presented some work-in-progress at a workshop, without proceedings. You have a conference paper accepted and you've been invited to make some minor revisions. The workshop presentation is built upon data used by the conference paper, but the methodologies are different. The workshop presentation drew a conclusion that you're ...


0

For something like this it is unlikely that you would be expected to cite the original source. Cite what you have found. An exception would be in research directly related to studies of sourcing and such, but I doubt that is your need here. Some things are lost in the mists of time, of course, and others are apocryphal.


8

The impact factor is not the right measure. The impact factor counts the average number of citations a paper receives in the two years after publication. But in most papers, most of the references given are for papers (substantially) older than two years, and consequently they don't count for the impact factor of the journals cited. That means that the ...


1

I suspect that this phenomenon has two main causes: There is a delay between publishing a paper and having it cited. If you look again at those papers, you might be able to get a sense of the distribution of the time between when each cited publication was published, and when the citation occurred (i.e., when the present paper was published). It is highly ...


6

First of all, you cannot assume that citations follows a normal distribution. I'd wager that it is rather skewed, with many papers receiving few or no citations, and a few reaching several thousand. This, however, does not help you too much, when you look at the citations of your own work - which is most likely not in the latter category (so few papers are......


1

It seems you want to cite sources that suggest social network sites such as Facebook and Twitter have been studied more than others such as Instagram. The quote you provide seems supportive, so you can cite it. When citing, be careful to ensure that your claims are supported by the authors' work. E.g., in this instance, favour phrases such as suggest, hint, ...


1

If you take others work then you need to cite it. Otherwise it is called plagiarism.


6

You should stick to one citation style in one document. But mentioning author names or publication dates in the text while using a numbered citation style is no problem: It was first shown by Heston in 1949 that the model is complete [4]. An easier proof can be found in [5].


3

No, you should be consistent. One exception: When using superscript in-text citation, when you use the citation as part of a sentence, it is no longer a superscript. Example: It was shown that the model is complete.1 An easier proof can be found in Ref. 2.


0

According to the 6th edition of APA: When using the exact words or a close paraphrase or summary of a source, a page number must be provided as part of a complete in-text citation. However, some publications (such as websites) have no numbered pages. To help readers locate the words being cited, include one or both of these elements: Paragraph ...


0

Often times, it depends on the journal requirements. For instance, looking at the journal of Weed Science, they actually give an outline to how they want these kinds of articles to be cited: Hassan MA, Yang M, Rasheed A, Jin X, Xia X, Xiao Y, He Z (2018) Time-Series Multispectral Indices from Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Imagery Reveal Senescence Rate in Bread ...


1

You could cite it the way you would cite R packages, example: https://www.r-bloggers.com/how-to-cite-packages/ Or you can check out how it is cited following different citation benchmarks using Google scholar. See here on Yihui Xie's page Or you can indeed cite it as a website, as @ff524 added.


-1

For me, I think that the use of references should not limit the creativity of the Doctorat candidate. Rather, they should be that springboard that get them produce more than what they get as intake. Numerically, I expect to have each single reference to be equated with two pages of the candidate's work as a maximum. This would mean that a dissertation of 300 ...


1

My approach is to select my folder and then manually select the items that I want to export to Overleaf. That might be the entire folder, in which case I can press Ctrl + A to select all items; or it might be most of them. I then select "Export Items" and upload the resulting .bib file to Overleaf. You can see an example here (selected all but one item I ...


1

I don't know what ResearchGate is doing, but Google Scholar shows many many more citations: https://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&as_sdt=0%2C6&q=walter+rudin&btnG= For example, "Principles of mathematical analysis" has more than 10,000 citations. "Real and complex analysis" has more than 16,600. "Fourier analysis on groups" has 3,500. These ...


2

This answer will be a bit orthogonal to the question. But Rudin's place is due to more than the number of papers written and citations. According to the Math Genealogy project, Rudin produced 24 successful PhD students and has 125 "descendants". These numbers are pretty big. Some of his students were, themselves very productive. A professor can be a ...


0

The answer to your question in the narrow sense is "yes". However, I'd like to answer what I perceive as a gist of your question. Because the short answer to that is yes, but. Software or method? Basically, the situation as I infer it, is: You have some problem. Typically it emerges from some applications, such as biomedicine, material sciences, chemistry, ...


1

SoftwareX: SoftwareX aims to acknowledge the impact of software on today's research practice, and on new scientific discoveries in almost all research domains. SoftwareX also aims to stress the importance of the software developers who are, in part, responsible for this impact. To this end, SoftwareX aims to support publication of research software ...


28

Yes. Software can be published as an open source tool with a peer review process. Several tradition-styled academic journals exist. Given the OP's profile, here are some journals that publish R packages, genetics tools, or environmental software: The R Journal Journal of Statistical Software Environmental Modelling and Software Molecular Ecology Resources ...


7

Sure it's publishable. You write up a paper detailing what is in the code, how to use it, examples, potential problems, and so on. Here's an example, and here's the Github link to the source code.


42

Yes, Open Source software can be published. What's required varies depending on the venue. There are general journals that focus on the software process. The idea is to encourage better software development gets the credit it deserves. Examples of journals with this approach are the Journal of Open Research Software and the Journal of Open Source Software. ...


0

I can't exclude the possibility that the author reads a paper-based version. It's absolutely this one, for sure. I cite a 1948 paper in the Journal of Navigation in many articles. It is not found online anywhere, not even in abstract form. So in those articles you see a citation like the one you point to, the original cite with no PDF or URL. In case ...


-1

I recommend the following actions: Make a reasonable quest to find the article, including contacting a library. However, I do not feel hard-to-find papers deserve too much tracing effort, unless your purpose is to be exhaustive. If the paper seems to be very important/relevant, cite it in the text by explicitly referencing the source of the reference, e.g. ...


0

I would suggest pursuing an Interlibrary Loan to get the article from another library. These can take a couple of weeks to come through. As others have noted, librarians are remarkably capable of hunting down copies of sources that are tricky to obtain.


5

Apply the principle: "When in doubt, explain your choice." You'll need to devote a sentence or two to say where you've actually found the point you're citing; where it cited from; and the fact that it the indirect source is difficult to obtain. If you do that - everyone will understand: What the reality is. What you did. Why you did it. ... so there's no ...


-2

I'm going to go against the grain here a little bit. I will preface my answer by saying I don't know anything about your field, so everything I've found is based on the information you provided. Yes, cite it, even if you can't find it If it were a relatively recent paper (~5 years old) or is controversial, you should absolute not cite it if you have not ...


2

You should ask the organization specifically what is appropriate. It might be fine, but I know of other such international collaborations in which it is specifically forbidden to claim authorship. The work is attributed to the committee as a whole, by name. An additional reason for not doing this is the question as to whether it is a creative work on your ...


1

Do you know any of the authors citing the papers? You can email them and ask where to get the paper or whether they can sent it to you. If you have an adviser, ask them. Maybe they know about the paper or one of the authors citing the paper. If you know from current or former members of your group citing the paper, you might find it in some repository or ...


1

It is a bit risky to cite papers having seen only the abstract. You might be able to contact the original authors in some cases for more complete versions. But, the safe and approved way to get access to papers that aren't easily available online, or available only by conflicting with with ethical considerations, is to go to your local library and ask the ...


55

If you absolutely can't find the original work, a viable solution is to reference the original work "as cited in" the secondary work (e.g. Smith, 1960 as cited in Doe, 2000). Many style guides contain explicit instructions on how to do this. First a caveat: yes, you should generally do your best to find and read the article that you want to reference, ...


72

I would definitely try contacting your librarian at your university library. University libraries collect physical copies of papers and they might have this one. Librarians are also a lot more versed in navigating the various search systems and they will probably be able to find this paper, if only as a hard copy. It is also possible that your university ...


27

Don't cite it without reading it, but get help finding it. You can consider asking a librarian for this kind of help.


2

Yes - the style is determined by the publication venue. As someone who works with a bibliographic database (Mathematical Reviews / MathSciNet), I find brief citations systems that use last name + initials "quaint" at best. Yes, a human can possibly sort out whether A.B. Smith refers to Alan Brian Smith or Alice Beatrice Smith. However, if both are ...


2

The guidelines to the venue you are submitting to must be your guideline. After all, the title of the paper is what distinguishes one author from the other. And this information is present in the bibliography. For the in text references, neither University of Leeds nor The University of Melbourne has any suggestion for such situation. However, both use the ...


5

In this case it seems like the only change between the 1995 arXiv version and the 2004 one is that some missing figures were added. You can see this in the arXiv comments field (Also note that v2 is still dated 1995). Therefore you should go ahead and cite the published version. If in the future you find a published paper with unpublished addenda then you ...


7

I think best practice is to include the arxiv identifier for any paper you cite anyway, so the bibliography will include both the publication info and a link to the arxiv. In that sense you don't have to choose just one. If it's say in the introduction and you're writing "The stabilization hypothesis was introduced in [BD]" there's no need to specify which ...


Top 50 recent answers are included