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3

It is probably best that it goes in the bibliography, which should represent a full accounting of the resources you draw on. It is an obvious place to put the URL of the web site. In general, it is better to be a bit formal in such things than informal, whether you literally need to cite it or not.


1

Just open with: This section summarises research by A et al. [1].


6

Sometimes (not often) papers will formally cite the package. This is more likely to work if the authors have published a peer-reviewed paper that describes the package; it makes it easier to cite/more likely to be cited. In the case of the tidytext package (which may or may not be the package you're referring to), you can find the citation info here. More ...


6

We could argue whether this is technically this is or isn't "the same source". More productive is to ask, "could relying strongly on multiple essays in the same edited volume be putting blinders on your thinking?", and the answer is yes. The use of multiple, genuinely independent sources ensures you have had to engage with different ...


2

Your question suggests that this was for a tutorial. Perhaps the tutor wished you'd looked around more, even though you found many useful separate references bound together. You can ask. I doubt that an editor would object that this was a "single source".


2

There’s no unique answer to this as citation styles (in text or in bibliography) are somewhat personal or institutional. Some good ways of getting guidance include Get one or more previous theses on the same topic and follow those models, Look up established journals in the field and use their models (if they have a common one). I personally prefer your ...


1

Clearly. The main purpose of a bibliography entry is to properly identify the work, with enough information that (at least in principle) your readers can find the work and read it for themselves. If the github.io repository doesn't suggest a citation format, make up something reasonable that serves that purpose. The precise formatting doesn't matter (or if ...


0

If your paper is already into Google Scholar, it id easy, anyway, eventually, it will (if not yet). You can cite like the following example: Robertson, Eric, et al. "Manipulation Data Collection and Annotation Tool for Media Forensics." Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition Workshops. 2019. Additionally, ...


4

There are at least four freely available databases which have this function. In random order: Lens: In Lens, instead of the default Sort by Relevance choose Scholarly Citations (highest) Microsoft Academic: In Microsoft Academic, choose SORT BY MOST EST. CITATIONS Dimensions: In Dimensions, choose Sort by: Citations ScienceOpen: In ScienceOpen, select Sort ...


2

You can use www.semanticscholar.org to see the extractions of the paper citing the specific article you want. In other words, you will see what and how other researchers use that paper, if applicable. To do so, you need to type and search for the paper you want. You will see a section called "Citations: Publications citing this paper," and you can ...


4

This journal (like many if not most journals) publishes articles online before formally assigning them to issues. Cite the issue date. Prior to most journals moving completely online, journals would formally accept articles and then take weeks to months before publishing articles. As online access became more common, journals would publish articles as "...


1

This is really just an opinion based on the comments here. I'd suggest that you leave it out of the publication, but inform the publisher's editor of the award. Ask them for advice about including it or whether the publication can add a note instead. For a less formal "local" publication or a report to a professor, I'd suggest putting it in. On the ...


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