New answers tagged

6

Some people will agree with, and some will oppose, the idea that some things are so obvious they don't need to be cited. Here're two essays on Wikipedia about whether one should cite that the sky is blue. Wikipedia:You don't need to cite that the sky is blue It's pedantic. There is no need to verify statements that are patently obvious. It leads to over-...


2

Different institutions may have different expectations, but I think this example from Davidson College Library website is fairly typical: Information qualifies as common knowledge when it can be found in a significant number of sources and is not considered to be controversial. General descriptions of social customs, traditions, and observable world ...


-1

As I'm sure you know it isn't correct to just copy things from others. However, there are a couple of additional considerations. Something is really plagiarism only if it is copied without citation. Then, the author is claiming the work of others as their own. The safest way to avoid this is to use quotes, as you suggest, but certainly to cite. However, ...


0

Haven't used it, but I found this: https://codequiry.com/


1

You should concisely discuss this in your application. In the US, the Statement of Purpose would be the appropriate place for this (I do not know about the Canadian system). Since you have already completed a degree since being expelled (and are switching areas), there is no need for a lengthy post-mortem, and this shouldn't be a dis-qualifier. More ...


0

Independently of whether you like the treatment of the theory by A (maybe it's incomplete, low-quality or even partially wrong), you have come across the theory through A. At this point, it is a matter of integrity to give credit to A for this. Yes, the theory has been around before, and OP can develop their own derivatives, that is perfectly fine. It is ...


3

Honestly, there's too less info provided here for strangers on the internet to guess and come to a conclusion. I'd recommend talking to your research guides to look into the content and sort out the matter. After-all, it's a few definitions, and you have branched off to create fresh research on your own anyway, so your research isn't in danger. "Pick and ...


2

Self plagiarism is when you use your old work without citing it. It can be avoided with citation, just as you would if the original was from another author. So, in this case, it would probably be considered to be self plagiarism. However, you have another problem in that the professor may have wanted you to do something new, not to recycle work from the ...


3

Yes, they will be flagged by Turnitin. However, why don't you just cite your own research? In that case, it's not plagiarism because you cite your own work correctly.


0

If your own supervisor is plagiarizing your work, then that's a major ethics violation. Get the article retracted, and inform the Head of Department, or higher up, in writing of your concerns.


0

These kind of situations are always critical. Ethics gives us rules of conduct that in same cases we realistically neglect. I have no idea about what the boss and the at that time PhD student can do and cast on your current career. But as you already correctly have interphered with their plot of publishing the work of others under their names, go ahead and ...


5

In addition to the advice being offered to retract (rather than correct) the journal article, I suggest that you contact the officials at the university where you did the thesis. I imagine that the legal office at the university will be especially interested to learn about violations of copyright by their faculty. Should such information become "public ...


6

See note and caveat at the end. I suggest that you have a retraction done. You didn't participate directly in the preparation of the offending paper, so adding you as an author is a bit fishy. Moreover, adding you would connect you to people who seem to have no ethical boundaries. I'd guess that you don't want that association. If the retraction is issued,...


1

I understand your situation as I had gone through the exact same thing. Am sorry that it happened. Anyway based on my experience I would suggest you need to assess the extent of copying based on that you need to first try contacting the authors(if you want to maintain the relation request for the addition of your name give them time and wait for the reply). ...


-1

As I haven't seen either code, and as a university professor myself, based on what you have mentioned, I would recommend that you consult with the GPL licensing authority.... They can decide about the proper respond both legally and ethically


9

What that person did, was not just plagiarism, but also copyright infringement. They took a GPL licensed work (legal), modified it (still legal), published it, but not under the GPL license (copyright infringement), and claimed it as their own work (plagiarism). If you wanted to be nasty, you could tell the original author of the code about this, and if ...


41

With the caveat that I am not a lawyer, the answer is "no". You have: code A, which is GPL-licensed code B, which is a derivative work of A and not GPL-licensed. The GPL license requires that all derivative works are also GPL-licensed. As B does not carry the GPL license, it is a copyright violation and (depending on jurisdiction) it is probably illegal ...


0

The other answers (at this time) all take at face value that plagiarism likely or potentially occurred. While it may have, before pursuing a line of action predicated on this, I would as dispassionately as possible ask an Occam's Razor question: Is the timeline -- your application/interview, time to perform the research, time to write it up, peer review, ...


6

No, there's no "statute of limitation" on plagiarism. It's a lot like murder in that way. I've had people complain to me that they had their work plagiarized by papers that were published 10 years earlier - it happens and the likelihood increases with time as the papers are there forever. You report it to the journal where your work was published; that's it, ...


31

I strongly recommend to contact the editor of the journal involved and explain the situation. Yes, this may lead to a retraction or expression of concern, but that is still better than to sit on this information, and ( more likely than not ) someone else finding out. For guidance you can check the retraction policy of the publisher. Certainly the larger ...


5

Check if your institution have guidelines on plagiarism and follow them. If not, maybe discuss with some of your colleagues how you've been duped and recomend them to check their coauthored work. After all, your primary concern is about not falling victim of a plagiarism accusation in the future, so the best insurance for that should be some moral ...


3

The fact that you ask the question at all after all this time is impressive and speaks for itself. I would go with the advice given by @Wolfgang Bangerth although, of course, strictly speaking it would be the right way to report the issue and accept the consequences. Let's say you would have commited some sort of offence in the 'real world', like ...


59

Move on. In the abstract, of course, we should care about these things but, in reality, a paper that has been out there for 8-10 years has passed the statute of limitations. It is exceedingly unlikely that anyone will go back and check papers that old -- indeed, even if someone finds textual overlap with other sources, it will require quite a lot of work and ...


51

You should contact the official at the visiting student's PhD institution who is responsible for academic integrity. They should investigate the student's thesis for plagiarism, potentially leading to the revocation of the PhD degree. For the visiting student's publication, you should contact the journal and let them decide what to do. I would guess they ...


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