New answers tagged

3

The head author’s insistence that you contributed is irrelevant. One simply cannot make someone a coauthor without their consent. I suggest that you reply to the chain of emails with something along the following lines: Dear [ACM editors], Thank you for your assistance with the issue of the coauthorship of [paper]. My colleague [head author], cc’ed, is ...


17

Is re-using an idea from a research proposal considered as self-plagiarism? No: You can re-use ideas from research proposals which you haven't executed upon, i.e., ideas that you haven't advanced (e.g., because the research proposal was rejected or that part of the proposal was never addressed or ...), they're still fresh ideas.


0

There is an academic offense usually called facilitation (or something similar). Basically helping someone complete an academic assessment is considered on par with cheating, and an offense as serious cheating. Certainly where I work a person can be accused of facilitation even if the second party is not in the same class or even in the same university. ...


1

I'm still not sure that I understand the entire scenario, so this will be a bit hypothetical. If you write something but it isn't published in any form then, later, you can simply copy and publish any part of it without citation or further comment. It isn't self plagiarism to use your own unpublished work. Assignments in a course might, however, follow some ...


0

To answer the literal question: probably the U.S. university would not hear about it at all, so, ... "no, nothing would happen here". Even if a U.S. university did "hear about it", I don't think there are procedures in place to do anything about it. So, yeah, probably any (routine/typical) academically unethical stuff a student here does ...


-1

Given that student A won't personally gain anything from doing this (only hurting student B), I think it is wise for A to wait at least till he graduates (and better, gets a job). If B were to report A then A's university wouldn't do anything since A already graduated. The reason for this is that it would be too much hassle for A's univeristy to try to take ...


9

If I understand this correctly, you were under the impression that proper quotation of sources means to have them in your bibliography (and nothing else). You then quoted from those sources without quotation marks and footnotes to the reference quoted. I’d explain that to them, apologize, and ask for a good source how, in the future, to quote according to ...


-2

Since you are a first-year student, the bar here is pretty low. Still, your professor has threatened to escalate this to a formal academic misconduct matter (presumably based on an allegation of plagiarism) and so you should note the standard Miranda advice used in policing: anything you say may be used against you. In view of this, you should immediately ...


8

You seem to assume that the academic honesty rules at a university will always stipulate that dishonesty only counts as being against the rules if it occurs at that university. That is a dangerous supposition to make. Many universities have academic misconduct policies that refer broadly to collusion, cheating, and other forms of misconduct, without ...


2

It is possible that A would face discipline if it became known, especially if everything became known to A's university. Academic dishonesty is independent of borders. There are no US laws for this, however. Honor codes don't have a "cross border" exception. And saying that "A did not violate any discipline of his university in the US" ...


0

As far as I remember (it's about 20 months since I last used Turnitin), the only way Turnitin can check for plagiarism in which the source is another student assignment is if that other student assignment has been placed in the repository. So you can either choose to keep your students' assignments out of the repository, or check for student-to-student ...


2

Plagiarism isn't just about copying words, it's about failing to credit sources, especially those contributing intellectually to some work. Of course, I'll change sentence structures and words in my talking and tell in a different way as much as I can You can't take something you've read and just reorganize the sentence structures and call it your own work....


1

Textbook writers regularly synthesize information in the way you suggest. Some information is common knowledge. When they take ideas from particular sources they credit those sources, whether they quote directly or paraphrase. Not doing that would violate copyright in many instances. Without more detail it's hard to advise you. I suggest you look at several ...


14

I wonder whether the committee member is not so much concerned about plagiarism per se as whether you actually understand your advisor's work. An undergraduate thesis is supposed to involve, at least in part, the student gaining a certain level of mastery of prior literature (as well as building on it.) This sort of understanding is usually conveyed in a &...


2

It is possible that the reviewer has a misconception. It is also possible that you do. Rewriting things "in your own words" is not a guard against plagiarism, which isn't about copying "words" but about misattribution of the source of ideas. The proof against plagiarism is to make it clear where the ideas came from by using citation and ...


12

If nothing else, if your paper gives the impression (by skimpy biblio) that you are not acquainted with the mountain of work on public-key crypto in the last 40-50 years, people will likely not even want to look at it. There are toooo many cranks who think they have a terrific idea, but are ignorant of the actual literature. So, in this year, it would be ...


19

While you say that your work is completely original, it is unlikely that nothing you have written relates to previous work. If this really is the case, then the paper is certainly missing vital information. A cryptography paper is not just a description of an algorithm. There are many important things that need to be discussed: What is the problem that ...


5

While I sympathize with your concerns, let me give some background, and possibly a solution. First, a good student exercise that leads to insight is an extremely valuable thing. Text book authors often will vet their exercises with real students to assure that they lead the faithful student to the right conclusions, and preferably to insight. In some of my ...


62

It depends what you're actually saying in the paper. If all you're saying is "We invented cryptographic algorithm X.", then you may not need any citations at all, but that would be a really uninteresting paper. A more interesting paper might say "Cryptography is necessary in the modern world because A, B, and C. We invented cryptographic ...


30

Most of the contents are completely original. How do you know with only two references? Show your readers and reviewers that your work differs from what has been done before. Show them that you know what has been done. That's what references are (also) for.


111

Citations aren't just about avoiding plagiarism. They are more about embedding your work into a scientific context. Every paper should explain in an introduction section why this work is relevant, and how this work differs from previous approaches. It is extremely rare that an approach is so novel that there is no meaningful prior work that can be ...


4

If the work is truly yours, and if you understand the state of the art and how we got to the present in the field and the work doesn't, in fact, plagiarize, then you should submit it. Reviewers will give you feedback on it. But, a warning. Plagiarism won't necessarily be caught by an AI system, since it is about ideas, rather than their explicit expression. ...


1

IIRC, Turnitin has a configuration option to ignore matches in the reference list. You could suggest that the editor switches on that option.


2

Overleaf is indeed slightly more insecure than Dropbox, Git or e-mail, because it has one additional avenue for attack: you can get illicit access to a document stored there if you obtain the 24-digit hex number that appears in its URL. Clearly the probabilities to guess one at random are minuscule, but there are in theory some exploits that could help (...


1

First, the use of the earlier material may have been plagiarism or not. If the methodology was "common knowledge" then it need not be cited. Second, if sections were copied, verbatim, without citation, then it is still an error but one of copyright violation, not plagiarism. Copyright is about words (actually "creative expression"). ...


0

I think you need to do two things. First, and I don't know whether it will save you or not, talk to the professor and explain that in your past education you never learned the rules expected in your current situation and that what you did would likely be acceptable. I'm assuming that is true, of course, and don't really know the details of the education ...


2

I think you will need to provide more information before anything else can be determined. However, a few pieces of advice can be given First, try to read up on the plagiarism guidelines of your institution. Reach out to teachers and/or colleagues to get a better sense of how plagiarism works where you are. It is essential to familiarise yourself with the ...


25

A wide range of Academicians and Researchers have been using overleaf for a long time now, none of them have complained of anything as such other than some suggestions of improving it. I've personally never had any issues with overleaf since it is much more convenient to have a common platform for collaboration. Also, being insecure about an idea/paper being ...


58

Overleaf is unlikely to be a problem To plagiarize your work, someone would have to find it very valuable hack your Overleaf account (and know it is there they need to hack) or that of your coauthors or you would have to have shared it publicly finish the research before you do, which typically means they would have to have superior or in any case solid ...


5

Just be honest: Be clear who contributed what. (And follow institutional guidelines.)


0

The answer to this is going to depend on country and disciplinary norms. But in my field (molecular biology/genomics) and country (UK) this is perfectly fine, normal even, as long as you are clear which data you generated, and which was generated by your collaborator.


1

Nice, you have another citation to show! Great. :-) Is that plagiarism? No. They built on what you published and referenced your work. Is it fair? Depends. I can imagine it's a mixture of Perhaps they read your paper a while ago when they started out with that research and mentally incorporated it into their idea of a general canon of prior art, and made it ...


1

Based on your example it sounds possible that the authors actually do consider the "completely standard step" to be completely standard. In other words, they could've done the step without your paper to guide them. As an elementary example, say you need to compute the derivative of a complicated function. You could work your way through it, or you ...


12

I agree with the other answers, in that you should probably let it go. But I think it would also be helpful to point out a broader lesson that I learned through similar experiences: take your frustrations as opportunities to get better. Like you — and most researchers — in my early years I was particularly anxious for the recognition that I felt my hard ...


2

Let it go, you won't be able to get a published paper changed in retrospect. But if you review papers, keep this in mind and ask the authors to give proper credit to cited work. This would be the right point to change misleading texts when changes are likely.


69

I agree with your assessment that this is misleading behavior on the part of the authors. I have run into this kind of behavior myself, including from authors who were famous researchers (and who were famous because they actually did very good work and not because they were good at misleading people about doing good work). It seems like it’s just human ...


22

It isn't plagiarism to suggest that your work is less relevant than you think it is. It is only plagiarism if they use it in any way without a citation and then give the impression that the ideas in the work are their own and not yours. But, if they are clear about whose ideas are whose, then you should let it go - as plagiarism anyway. Saying misleading ...


0

I am afraid that the reviewer was right. Be aware that direct quotes (which, yes, must have the quotation marks or the indented separate paragraph) of more than a dozen words are rarely if ever necessary. You should have paraphrased. Now as for your old mentor. S/He may be upset, but since you were just an undergrad, s/he should have caught the plagiarism ...


0

Do not copy parts from the internet. You can always paraphrase and there is always a paraphrasis that suits your context better. It is odd that you should talk about not being able to "check for plagiarism" when you know that you copied. I get the impression that you are perhaps trying to hide behind not having had enough time. I am not trying to ...


-1

Turn it over to the "module convener" "course leader" or whatever it is called at your institution.


0

In general (not related to plagiarism specifically, focusing on the "not answering" part), my suggestion is to decide yourself, inform them on the decision, and follow through with it. As an example: I work in IT, and often I need clarification from some stakeholder about some requirement for a software we are developing. I know from experience ...


0

I would proceed with the following in mind (paraphrasing the Berkeley Course on Physics): Ideally, every part of a course, including exams (and in your case for sure homework), should provide an opportunity for the student to learn something. In your case, they should learn about the subject matter and about plagiarism: They should do their bloody own ...


1

You should note that it was "cited by" if you didn't go back and read the original source. You have no idea if the person citing the source did so correctly or took it out of context. "Cited by" tells the reader that you have not read the original source, and that is important information in nearly all cases.


2

First, all the other responses explaining that you need to check your institution's formal policies about plagiarism apply. It is possible, if unlikely, that one of the two teams submitted original work and the other team copied that work. In this case, only one of the two teams has plagiarized. (The team who did the work probably should not have let the ...


1

How should I proceed from here? As all the other answers have stated, you should contact an academic to learn what are the appropriate steps in your institution. While no University I know of is really lenient towards plagiarims, the steps (and your freedom to decide them) vary a lot. Like, where I studied, academic plagiarism was technically a felony - ...


7

It seems that you have already tried to convince him, and it has been unsuccessful. I don't know what else you can do to convince him. I would say that if I found plagiarism in any part of the work, the entire work, as well as the authors become suspect. It would very likely be automatically rejected. My advice to you, is to stop working with him or, if you ...


4

How should I proceed from here? The other answers address this. Is it OK for students to ignore the instructor's emails on such an important issue? Yes, unless your university has a policy saying otherwise. Normally there is no obligation to defend one's self against accusations. If the accused is either obviously guilty or obviously innocent, staying ...


7

The correct course of action is strongly institution-dependent. The most important things are to remain polite and not indicate you have reached a conclusion when communicating with the students, to keep a paper trail of all communications with the students, and immediately advise to the appropriate authorities. Where I work there is an official form to ...


6

I dealt with this exact issue in the last fall semester. The best practice likely depends on your institution's rules. At my institution, we have a distinction between academic sanctions and disciplinary sanctions. Academic sanctions are those applied purely by the instructor, with the effect of lowering grades on a particular assignment or course. The ...


41

In the case of suspected plagiarism you have to follow your institution's formal rules. I'm sure your university has those. This might not seem a helpful answer but it is the only correct one. For example, the course of action outlined in another answer (while perfectly sensible) would violate university policy at my institution and get me in real trouble if ...


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