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5

is this academic misconduct? That depends. Your thesis is published, just not in a journal. It’s published as part of your alma mater’s repository and anyone can access it, your advisor in particular. Regarding the figures: it really depends on how they did it. If they copied them without citing your thesis that’s pretty clear cut plagiarism which is wrong ...


2

Plagiarism pertains to academic output, not administrative documents, so formally this is not an issue. That being said, admissions committees do receive all the documentation in a package for each applicant, and if I saw a package with two substantially identical letters, it would be a bit unusual. In some cases, especially for admission at the Masters ...


8

This will not be classified as plagiarism. A letter of recommendation does not pretend to be original, it is just a bureaucratic document that is supposed to give information on the extent to which the recommender recommends you.


1

I give an oral quiz to each of my students, not to find plagiarism but to assess understanding of the material. I pay close attention when a student of whom I believe to have "paraphrased" their entire paper. I'm a science teacher which puts me at an advantage. if the student can't comment on any of the challenging concepts, I find it suspicious.


2

It is very possible that it is unethical, but it would take a bit of analysis to clarify it. Your course professor is probably a good person to adjudicate it. I'd suggest that you take the problem to them, preferably in person. Using other people's work without attribution is plagiarism. Go see the prof.


0

Well, know this. you can't do anything if the student is just waving his head. you can only warn him/her to pay attention on their jobs; but you can't give zeros to them. because 'just waving the head' isn't a reliable reason. It may the student say I have neckache! (but in fact he/she is cheating) and you can't prove the cheating. you can only assign zeros ...


-1

There is an argument that cheating should be clearly and formally forbidden, but it is not important to enforce that. The reasoning is based on that the student does harm only to himself. While enforcing it is not fundamentally important, it may still be desirable to enforce it, but with lower priority when short on resources. The base assumption may or ...


1

Interestingly our university undergraduate guidelines definition of collusion only specifies working with another student. So I guess this would count as plagerism rather than collusion. I wonder however, if the rules for PhD students give a better definition of what is an isn't acceptable: It is acceptable for a student to receive the following support ...


0

If you state it accurately, then yes, it is collusion and maybe plagiarism if she presents the work as her own when it is not. I would think that the limits are also hard to discern. If the father reads and makes comments then it is hard to say how important those comments are. But it is probably difficult to prove without an admission. But the father ...


4

I experienced a related situation when I was supervising a written exam as TA: I caught a student cheating who actually (though probably accidentally) admitted cheating ("I couldn't read anything" - yea but already trying to read other's answers is cheating). When telling my prof, he decided to nevertheless have the exam graded regularly. His explanation: ...


31

Beer and Circus calls this the "student-faculty non-aggression pact": Faculty provide an easy class and don't look too hard into cheating Students happily take the easy grade and leave the professor free to do research I wouldn't say this is "the rule"; plenty of faculty do an awesome job teaching. But, I'm not surprised to hear your report -- some faculty ...


7

Edit: question has changed. You probably cannot do much now. Once I realized what was happening, I started assigning zeros to the offending students, in accordance with University policy. As a TA, you should have spoken to the professor about the situation before taking any action. Student misconduct is squarely in the professor's area of ...


5

The call for papers is normally written by the guest editors of the special issue, so they are probably the ones at fault here. If, as you say, that other journal is reputable, then its editor (i.e., the usual editor, not the guest editors of the special issue) probably doesn't want to be seen as complicit in such a disreputable activity as aping another ...


0

"First and foremost, I would like to thank my advisor's support and guidance. I also want to extend my gratitude to my PhD committee. Finally, I would like to thank the research funding from XXXXX. " These are very typical language used in the Acknowledgement part. Do the similarity check using any anti-plagiarism check software, and see if you'd like to ...


0

I really don't think acknowledgment is part of the academic work, and this part can be very personal and freestyle. I guess nobody really cares about this part. Plus the fact that many people use the same language in this part. All in all, I don't think this is a big deal


0

You could put this statistic background into an appendix of the paper instead of the main body. Give it proper credit and then nobody should get the mistaken impression that you claim this to be your own work.


4

I suspect you're overthinking this. I would just write something like: II. Related Work A. Statistical Model Our work uses a statistical model from X et al [44]. As this model is of fundamental importance in our work, we will present a thorough summary of their work in this subsection. ... B. Something Else.


4

Talk to your advisor. If you have compelling evidence they may be willing to stake their reputation and research collaboration with this group in order to get them to at least acknowledge your contribution after the fact. Again, you need to be prepared to hear that your advisor will be very limited in what they can do apart from trying to straighten things ...


1

Here's a little more detail on Turnitin's process. It's a little too much for a comment, and offers some hints as to what's going on. Turnitin (produces a "similarity score" using a black-box algorithm, but the marker can see duplicated passages, and in many cases their sources*. In the reports I marks, a similarity score of around 20% is common for ...


1

But what would be your response as an instructor if a student did this? I can't speak for other academics, but I would have no problem with this. Unless there is an instruction in the assignment to the contrary, I do not think it is reasonable to expect the student to refrain from looking at outside materials. (Indeed, one would usually regard it as ...


2

This is something you should ask the instructor in person. Especially if the instructor is a reasonable person, they will want to know that you had no chance to complete the assignment. Ideally you tell them before (some profs have office hours), or at the latest when you hand in the assignment. Tell them what you did. Then they may decide to accept, reject ...


2

This depends on the rules of the course and has no general answer. For some courses and for some assignments within them, this would be expected. In others, forbidden. Only the instructor can give you guidance. But, you did the right thing in citing it. You were honest. Also, you learned something, which was the point of the assignment. But perhaps you ...


7

I am a professor. Even if you don't have any "hard" evidence that you wrote it yourself, one thing that would be convincing to me, if I was on this committee, was that you knew the material you handed in. E.g. you could take an oral exam on the material. So, make sure you really know what you handed in and why you wrote it the way you did. And as written on ...


4

From turnitin.psu.edu: False Positives A false positive, that is a paper with a high similarity score that is not the result of a student committing plagiarism, can occur for the following reasons. If a rough draft is stored in the Turnitin repository, you may get a false positive for a final draft. If a student submits a paper to ...


5

In addition to other excellent answers, I suggest you use make the following argument: Rare events are likely in large populations ... to explain why it is reasonable for your version of events to have occurred. The panel would be thinking: "It's extremely unlikely for independently-written reports to have such a high degree of similarity - @Ballislyf ...


0

The other answers seem to have summed up the main part. I'd only add that, depending on where you are, threatening a lawsuit might actually be a good course of action as well. Where I'm from (in Eastern Europe) many professors would probably drop the whole thing if you get them to believe you will actually sue the university as it's not worth the trouble and ...


16

I've read the above answers, and they seem to give pretty good advice, but I have some more for you that isn't about procedures of college, but on personal etiquette and experience when being questioned by those who have authority. In the military we say, "He who yells first has lost the argument." When you go into this, have your facts ready, and find ...


13

You don't have the option of resubmitting the reports -- and haven't since the day you handed in the reports. If a hearing process has been started, it will be finished. 68% similarity is a high number, and unlikely to happen by pure coincidence. I suggest you examine your process of writing your lab reports with a fine tooth comb, and be ready to convey ...


14

Find an advocate to support you. Some universities have an office (ombudsman) for this. In other places a student organization provides help. You may even need a lawyer if you are able to afford one. Another professor who trusts you might be able to help. Papers were similar. It happens. I assume that whoever did the previous work had the same teacher, ...


25

Firstly, use version control. It's quite likely that you've produced your report in either MS Word, Libre Office or Google Docs. All of these programs store old revisions, although Google Docs stores all of the revisions while Word and Libre Office only a limited number. If you're able to produce evidence of partial work, it'll be clear you've produced the ...


59

In this kind of hearing, evidence will be paramount. "I know I did not cheat" isn't sufficient - that's just a denial. You need more, e.g.: Can you show that you could not possibly have known about these 2 reports? Do you have drafts of the report, preferably with time stamps, as you were writing it? Did you work with anyone else? If so, can they vouch for ...


1

When compiling a dissertation, copying parts or entire sections from published papers is perfectly fine and standard behaviour. If a section is (mostly) identical with a published paper, it should say so clearly at the start. If the paper is submitted, but not yet published, you could either just treat it as published, and cite the submitted version; or ...


-3

Since you have the publisher's permission to use the words of the original you can quote freely. But make sure that it is a quote and that you actually cite the original. Simply reusing the words without quoting will confuse any future reader. You avoid self-plagiarism by quoting the work as you would any other. You avoid copyright infringement by getting ...


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