New answers tagged

1

I totally agree with the other answers, you should definitely report this. An aspect of the situation which I think other posts did not mention: you don't actually know that two-thirds colluded. The project is a group assignment and the students work in teams of 3-4 members. This year, four out of six teams submitted identical assignments (the only ...


3

Yes, absolutely without question. In fact, I've seen situations where the majority of the class cheated. It's not pretty, but it's been done before. This isn't playground hair-pulling or petty vengeance, academic integrity is sacred and it's right to report it.


3

A few things: it is important to report it, even if there is no punishment past "they have to redo the assignment and not collude" (which is more work for you of course) - reason being, there are serial cheaters and they "get by" by apologizing profusely if caught no matter what they do, it will likely be more work for you OR you will be ...


1

I see you've already taken action so this comment is late. Something for you and others to consider maybe is: You are correct this work should be graded zero. However maybe you could give them an opportunity to remedy their error? Reject the plagiarised work, and give them a stern talking to, explaining why you have rejected it, and explaining that they ...


7

I know you already reported this (which I think was the right thing to do), but for future readers, let me take another angle on this. Specifically, I'd like to focus on this paragraph: Moreover, I expect that the committee will rule that all students get a zero - both the ones who copied the answers, and the one(s) who provided them. At least this was the ...


-4

...copying an other team's assignment is wrong. tl;dr; It might help you decide what to do by considering deeply what you mean by "wrong". AFAIK, there is nothing Biblical (or Koranical, or [insert totally objective moral dogma here]) that governs your behavior in this specific scenario. Will reporting them to the university office create a ...


17

Something doesn't add up: Obviously, the students didn't think what they did was forbidden because they didn't try to hide the fact that the papers were identical. Probably, because they were supposed to cooperate to begin with, they falsely assumed it's OK to cooperate across groups. As with most misunderstandings the fault may not be exclusively on one ...


-2

If 2/3 colluded and they were all international students, then that is proof that this was due to misunderstanding. When I had to do experimental work at university, the set-up was that we had to work in groups of two, a report was to be written and we would be be graded based on the report. But it was then one report per group of two students, the grade ...


22

Yes, you should report them. It's the official policy, and it's also the right thing to do. It helps you by spreading out the responsibility for the failures (or whatever). Given the academic level and introductory anti-cheating module, it's overwhelmingly likely that these students have been cheating through their entire academic career, and have grown ...


70

The way I see it, my employer pays me to evaluate my students’ knowledge of the material I taught them. I am ethically bound to give only grades that reflect my honest assessment. In particular, if an assignment is turned in that I know to be plagiarized, I cannot in good faith give it a grade of more than zero. The student who submitted it has not credibly ...


103

You should. Dura lex sed lex. Not reporting it sends the message that plagiarism is OK if enough people do it. The grim consequences you envisage (like departmental disapproval) might not come to pass - after all you can't control if your students decide to cheat. Conversely, I would feel disturbed if the instructor passed cheating students to avoid high ...


194

In our school, we are expected to flag cases of suspected plagiarism and collusion to an internal academic offences committee. There's your answer. It's your job to report the offense.


0

Unless you are doing a historical examination of a theory, you don't always have to cite the original source of an idea. Some ideas have entered the literature to such an extent that authors may just give some key citations to major works, which may not have been the original works on the topic. Academic papers will sometimes briefly discuss the genesis of ...


2

You don't need to cite things that are "common knowledge". But this depends to a pretty big extent on the audience. If you were writing for me, you would need to cite it since this is the first time I'd be likely to see the term. If you were writing for a psychology audience it might be different (I can't judge, obviously). However, while it may ...


2

There is no need for a plagiarism checker on the author's side. Just follow the rules outlined by the institution/publisher, and that's it. Really! It is perfectly normal for plagiarism checkers to catch some text as potentially plagiarised. This is not problematic, as the checker is only there to help the grader or the publisher to detect plagiarism. For ...


1

If you cite their work, then it isn't plagiarism. You just make clear what things, especially ideas, came from them and which are your own. Plagiarism isn't about reuse, but about misattribution. However, you may have to deal with copyright as well which will limit how much of what they say can be part of your paper. But quoting brief passages (with citation)...


2

This exact situation happened a few years ago, and the result was: This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal (https://www.elsevier.com/about/our-business/policies/article-withdrawal). This article has been retracted at the request of the Editor-in-Chief of Results in Physics, the original authors and journal, IEEE ...


0

I won't speak to citation style, which is irrelevant for questions of plagiarism. But if you cite everything you use then you aren't plagiarizing. Plagiarizing is about attribution and by citing you avoid it. However, you also have the problem of copyright if you are taking too much from a single source. And "too much" can mean both or either of ...


6

Precisely as you state the issue, I agree with Bryan Krause, but there is a possible subtlety since these are grad students. There are some situations in which research assistance for details of statistical analysis might be appropriate. One way to sift the bad from the good is to ask the potential client whether you can ask their advisor for permission for ...


10

Yeah, it's wrong. A very similar scenario is a tutor doing a student's homework for them, rather than helping them learn how to do it themselves. It's probably unlikely you'd face any punishment for doing it, but ethics apply whether consequences are present or not. There's nothing wrong with giving some guidance, but it's pretty apparent if someone is being ...


2

You can just share it. Perhaps mention it as a result "in parallel" or "independently". You don't need to point out that you did it first or that they didn't cite you (this looks petty), just point out it exists and it's similar. Cite yourself, too, of course. Readers can follow the two citation paths and see that yours was indeed first, ...


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