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1

Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer. But what you suggest is fine unless the code has been patented. That is very unlikely, of course. Distinguish between using something (permitted - unless patented) and republishing it (depends on license). The only time in which you can't use something is when it has been patented but not licensed to you. I doubt that is ...


11

There are three issues: Is it a copyright violation? This depends on the license under which the original code was released. You'll have to read it. Is it plagiarism? No, you have credited the original author. However, you may want to make it more clear that it is really a relatively minor modification of their code. Your current wording, "developed ...


4

No, it is not unethical. If the original authors didn't want you to use the code, they would not have made it public. In fact they're likely to be flattered that you find their code useful/interesting enough to make use of it. Of course, you need to cite the original authors, since you're using their work.


7

If you use your friend's essay "as a guide", that means she'd already done the work on her essay by herself (and perhaps others), and consequently you were not "working on your essays together". The semester of separation just makes it more damning, but you could've done this in the same semester and it'd still have been basically the same problem. So just ...


19

I agree with everything Tom said, but I'd add that the in the meeting with the committee, they've likely already made up their minds. What you did was plagiarism and there is nothing you can tell them that will convince them otherwise. Do not be confrontational. Do not tell them that there's an interpretation of the rules that makes this ok. Do not try and ...


15

It sounds like you know what you did and have a pretty good idea as to why you are being called in. Whether you broke a rule, or pushed the boundary, regarding working together by choosing to work with someone from the past semester depends on the instructions given, the instructor, and departmental policy. You should be prepared to tell the committee what ...


57

When the instructor said you could work "together", they meant together with a student that hadn't previously completed the assignment. They expect both students (when working together) to contribute equally towards writing an essay from scratch. Basing your essay on another student's essay (that you did not work together on) is plagiarism. The best you ...


5

Adding to a few answers here, I agree that there's nothing wrong or unusual about this. My MS thesis lead to two conference papers and a journal paper. It's usually a good idea to publish papers from thesis work for at least three reasons: first, papers in well known conferences or archival journals are much easier for other researchers to find, so there is ...


0

How do I need to cite/reference the earlier version of this paper to avoid plagiarism concerns? From what the OP has written, I cannot see reason for plagiarism concerns. Releasing an early draft of a paper (even with different authors and a different title) and subsequently releasing an extended version does not constitute plagiarism. Nonetheless, it is ...


4

What I typically did in such a case was either a footnote at the title in the gist of A previous version of this paper appeared at XYZ Conference in 1201. or a mention in the introduction with the citation This paper is based on our previous work [ABCD+ '01]. Two side notes: If this is a paper and you submit double-blindly, you'd need to revise the ...


27

It's totally accepted to publish journal articles based on thesis chapters. For one thing, MS theses are not well abstracted or searchable. Even with Ph.D. theses, they are rarely looked at. Getting something into a journal article is doing the scientific community a favor. It's also good for you and your coworkers in terms of pub count. Consider the ...


10

If you treat the thesis (and the other paper) like you would any other previously published work, then you avoid self plagiarism. In other words, cite the thesis as the source of the ideas and quote from it as necessary. Since it is also likely that you hold copyright on it, though maybe not on the published paper, you can quote more extensively from it than ...


38

It is plagiarism only if you do not properly cite it. If you have not published the thesis itself, of course you can publish parts of it or summaries of it or even the whole thing unchanged. The requirement to avoid "self plagiarism" is to cite. For example, in the introduction write: This paper is taken from my thesis [title] done in [date] at [...


6

From what you've written, it seems plausible that your colleagues were also working on the scientific concept (or something similar), developed their own (similar) methodology, published a scientific paper, and attracted funding, which isn't misconduct. Establishing whether their review of your plans had any influence on their work will be difficult.


2

As a tertiary educator it is absolutely not your fault. All your students would have been taught not to plagiarise when they were in high school, perhaps even in primary or middle school. Your university or college would have a student handbook which would say that plagiarism is a serious academic offence. I personally wouldn't think it is even necessary to ...


2

Also consider whether you are perhaps 'forcing' them to do the tasks - e.g. by grading whether all the tasks are done instead of their skill (which admittedly is hard) when they don't have enough time on their hands. As a CS student I usually had more tasks to do per week than could be done in the time of a week, so having to prioritize was a given. One way ...


3

Could you have caused it? Most likely yes. One can certainly imagine something you did that made it more likely for your students to plagiarize; further proving that it is impossible for you to have caused it would be very hard. Should you feel responsible though is a different question. I will say no, you should not. Your students are (presumably) adults, ...


44

I suspect that in a group of 50 students there will be a few who want to cut corners. It isn't your fault, exactly, but there are some things you can do to make it less likely. If the number is small, you can deal with it individually in your office, of course. But you should consider why people feel that cheating of any kind is a viable option for them. ...


9

There is no excuse for plagiarism. They certainly know that they cannot just copy someone else's work (also not in parts) - especially if they want to become teachers by themselves! I like to give a few slides of the beginning of the term that make this very clear: If you copy then you will get a score of 0 for this assignment and I will watch all ...


3

Assuming you didn't actually publish it - you only posted a preprint - then the answer is no, it does not. However you will need to prove that paper is written by you and therefore not plagiarized. Submit the proof together with the paper, or you are likely to receive a desk rejection. You could for example upload the proof as a source file, and add an ...


2

I don't think journals actually use TurnItIn to check for this, the methods they use may be more or less effective, but if they do find out you published somewhere else, the TurnItIn saying it's not plagiarized won't help your case. Journals tend to not publish articles published elsewhere. However, their concerns here is being second fiddle to a competing ...


3

There are two complicating factors involved here. It may or may not be possible, but it depends on these issues at least. Even if it is possible, there may be some "risk". When the "organization" published your paper, did you assign your copyrights to them? It is possible that you did, and also possible that you retained all rights and just gave them a ...


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