New answers tagged

2

Where there is an audience, there will be some recording. If not a full recording, there will be some who take photographs, voice notes, screenshots and the like. The organizers can never guarantee against these. You can only request them and hope the audience acts in good faith. Crucially, you are allowed to choose the topic of choice, so why not choose ...


5

You tell the organizers you don't want your presentation to be recorded. That's about it. I've attended talks where the speaker said "these results are preliminary, please do not share" which is similar. Although in your case I wonder why you are giving a presentation in the first place, if you don't want other people to know what your research ...


1

To answer the titular question: absolutely yes. Now when it is dealt with, the bigger issue at hand is that students don't understand your expectations and the reasoning behind them. Make sure they understand what materials they are supposed to use for their assignments, how and why. Similar to how students doubted the need to not use the calculator for ...


3

Yes, this is a form of plagiarism called close copying.


2

Yes. As a student, many institutions provide access to plagiarism checkers, which highlight text that may be dubious. I used a small paperback version called APA: the Easy Way, my father had once shown me a similar compact Chicago Style Manual. Here is a link to Worldcat's list of libraries around Washington DC that have a copy of the first one: https://www....


2

Regardless of whether it is plagiarism, think about the context: if a student does this in an assessment then all they are demonstrating is the ability to use a thesaurus. Assuming the goal is not to assess the student's ability to use a thesaurus, any coursework demonstrating only that ability deserves a very low mark. This follows regardless of whether you ...


2

From my experience, this is taught by high school teachers because they, themselves, do not understand plagiarism; at least, in the US. I wouldn't blame the students as they were never taught what any of this means: they were taught they have to produce the work required, and if they don't produce the work required, they cannot continue and will fail the ...


1

The key concept of plagiarism is presenting someone else's work as your own. Deception is central to it. If you copy a passage verbatim, that's not plagiarism if you openly declare it to be a quote. It might be copyright violation, and handing in a paper that consists of nothing but direct quotes is unlikely to receive much credit, but it's not plagiarism. ...


2

Types of Plagiarism It often helps to break down plagiarism into different types. That's what Harvard does, for example, breaking it down into six kinds. A lot of other universities use the same or similar categories. The beginning of the course is the best time to (re-)explain what plagiarism is (ideally quoting your school's own policies) to hopefully ...


14

The clear, definitive answer to your question Is taking someone else's writing, and changing some of the words, inherently plagiarism? Is YES, and you need to go no further than a dictionary. the practice of taking someone else's work or ideas and passing them off as one's own. The moment your students (or anyone, for that matter) tries to solve a ...


9

Changing a few words is the worst form of plagiarism. It's basically proof the student knew it was wrong and is trying to hide it (I saw it most often with students copying from a friend's assignment, but same idea). "I'm sorry I didn't change more words" is really shorthand for "I know this class doesn't matter and you don't care. Let me go ...


2

The easiest thing to tell your students is this: If you use someone else's work, cite them. If you don't, you're committing plagiarism. When this issue comes up in undergraduate work, it almost inevitably comes down to intellectual laziness. The student in not focused on school; s'he wants to slide through to a passing grade with minimal thought and effort,...


4

I don't think there can be a clear definition. The point is whether "changing a few words here and there" meets the learning objectives of the assignment. If not, then it is trying to pass off the the content of the passage that does meet the learning objectives as being their own work and ought to be viewed as plagiarism. Using a thesaurus or ...


28

Students sometimes believe or claim to believe that plagiarism is some highly technical, perplexing concept. While it is important to clarify what plagiarism is and is not to the student, in an actual discussion with a student who believes that they should have "changed more words", I find it helpful to start from an ethical principle that the ...


42

Is taking someone else's writing, and changing some of the words, inherently plagiarism? The most concise, clear answer I can think of is the following: Plagiarism is about protecting ideas, not words; however, the way something is written is often a (protected) idea. The writing's structure and organization, the details that are included or excluded, the ...


11

Looking at this definition of Oxford University, plagiarism is using other people's ideas without acknowledging them. Under this definition, even if you were to change all the words, or rewriting the whole thing in your own words, you would still commit plagiarism, as long as you don't give credit to the original source where you took the idea from.


0

It is not a question of proportion, or how many words: plagiarism is a qualitative assessment. It is largely a question is claiming as own the idea of someone else. Clearly direct copying without attribution is plagiarism, but consider the following examples. During a final exam, two students Charlie and Bob make the same sequence of conceptual errors on a ...


3

First, at the end of the day, in a course setting, plagiarism—or the acceptable level thereof—is what the professor decides it to be. But I think that instead of concentrating on the amount of words changed, the key point that needs to be addressed with the students is another: if you have to read and change the words to write your essay, it means that you ...


-2

I will contribute an answer for the worst case scenario, in which you quit your PhD with a bit of bad blood with your former PhD advisor. I presume that otherwise you wouldn't even be asking that question. The contributions by your PhD advisor would not suffice for their co-authorship if you were senior academics on equal level. If you are a PhD student in ...


14

The stuff that you list all falls into "advising research students", and in mathematics mere advising tasks are generally not considered to merit co-authorship. As such, a single-author paper is a reasonable outcome. On the other hand, just running with the idea communicated to you in person by your advisor on your own might be a bit rude. Checking ...


-4

I think you are asking the wrong question. Without an academic affiliatuon getting accepted for publication will not be easy. You may want to contact your professor for this reason.


-2

Yes, it would be inappropriate to finish and publish this on your own. You should contact your former advisor: they should probably be offered authorship of a resulting paper. If they decline (a realistic possibility) you are free to continue on your own. Also, their help may prove valuable. Having somone experienced to check and improve the paper before ...


0

If you write the docs and retain copyright to them, then what you describe isn't really plagiarism. Plagiarism is attributing the ideas of others to yourself. But, the similarities between the two will raise questions unless you cite the docs in the paper, which is a natural thing to do. Make sure you list yourself as author of the docs and all should be ...


0

This behavior is a serious breach of the academic code of conduct. If the document were submitted as a finished product the proper way to deal with the problem would be to refer it to the appropriate disciplinary body at your university. The minimum punishment should be failure for this work. But it's just a draft, and you are just an advisor. So it's hard ...


1

Since it seems you are a graduate student: This is your supervisor's responsibility. It's good you already informed your supervisor. Ask your supervisor to address the problem. It is also possible your supervisor or someone else in the hierarchy already provided you with instructions on how to address this situation. Do not make up a new method if an ...


4

Do not take this personally. These students are not teasing, duping or laughing at you. They are trying to take the easy road to a good grade. They did it in a very obvious way. Either they do not know that this isn't allowed, or they do not care. They wasted your time, sure, but they've wasted their own time even more. And they did not do this to you ...


-5

As others suggest, I would report this, but - depending on the circumstances, and if you want to help the author save face somewhat, you might contact them first. You wouldn't ask "Have you plagiarized this section from that paper?" But rather "I've been reading your paper X and believe that sections Y might be a verbatim quote from paper Z. ...


-9

In cases of academic misconduct where you are not personally involved, it's often better to go do something useful instead of filing complaints. There's lots of plagiarized papers out there that nobody's going to read. Limit your complaints to academic misconduct that involves you personally or has importance to research or safety.


-10

I would also try to check if the 2 papers are both graduate student papers where the 2 authors were graduate students at the same time for the same advisor. There are some subjects where the first 6 pages is boilerplate as things are getting set up. If the advisor tells the 2nd student to copy the first 6 pages from the 1st student's paper, that is lazy but ...


7

Yes, draw it to relevant attention. Not least because if its a mistake the authors should have a chance to fix it; if (more likely) it isn't then who knows what the implications will be, down the line, of dishonest papers. People could spend years of their life doing work, only to find its invalidated and wasted, because underlying material was unreliable. ...


53

Yes. Such a grave case of academic misconduct should have publicly visible consequences. Let the editor know; the journal should issue a retraction as the whole article can be deemed to be unreliable. As retractions can take a long time, it would also be useful if you comment on the suspicion of plagiarism on PubPeer. (The authors could respond with a ...


0

Post about your suspicion on PubPeer, a platform for post-publication review.


4

So article A copies from article B while prominently citing article B. This is technically plagiarism since the text copied from B is not clearly presented as a quote. However, this type of plagiarism is harmless if not beneficial to science. After all, the authors of A have rescued the old article B from obscurity and made it more easily accessible. You ...


0

Plagiarism is not about computer programs (or humans) counting the number of identical words and comparing them to an arbitrary threshold. "Plagiarism is the representation of another author's language, thoughts, ideas, or expressions as one's own original work." In other words: if they solve the same problem as the original authors in a different ...


5

There is a difference between plagiarism and cheating. Plagiarism is taking someone else's work or ideas and representing them as your own (no matter whether verbatim or with some modification to hide their origin). Cheating during an exam, on the other hand, is using any help or sources of information you are not supposed to use (like peeking at a hidden ...


2

Occasionally, when I've recalled an odd fact to support an argument and remembered more or less where I got it I've thrown in a partial citation like this: Snails are very slow (from course textbook "Introduction to Zoology") But I would imagine that a professor is more likely to be concerned that you were looking at the textbook rather than not ...


16

This is where different styles of writing and standard bump into each other in unpleasant ways. In scientific writing, we generally do not directly quote unless the exact words of the original author have some importance. The strong preference is to paraphrase and cite. That said, some assert fairly arbitrary rules, such as "four words that are the ...


41

The single citation mark at the end of the paragraph does not fully convey just how close your paraphrased text is to the original paragraph. It would make a lot of sense to assume that the reference is just the source for the numerical values in the last sentence. As such, the charge of plagiarism isn't absurd here, as one could consider you to be ...


2

No, citation is proof against charges of plagiarism. Plagiarism is misattributing the ideas of others to yourself. It has nothing to do with whether you quote or paraphrase. It is about the underlying ideas. So, if you say, more or less, that idea x comes from author(s) y, then you haven't plagiarized. You still need to consider copyright, however, and some ...


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