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From a student's perspective: Don't do time crunched tests that don't really help anyone. Do a project or smaller quizzes. Especially in online classes, tests are the most agonizing task that create SO MUCH anxiety because there is so much that can go wrong that is out of our control. Most students also do better on a honor policy, to trust most students ...


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Yes, the use of unattributed material, or use of quotes without indicating they are quotes even with attribution, is plagiarism. If it's just a few sentences in a long dissertation, it's plausible that some of it was due to lazy note-taking, like copying the words of others into an intermediate document and not realizing months or years later that they were ...


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(I agree with the comment from UJM.) Since she was "curating" the journal, I guess that means it was a special issue, and there are other, permanent editors. You can approach them. I think if you do this carefully, there is not a great risk. What I mean by that is to focus on yourself: you have concerns that your paper is damaged by this. Don't ...


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When writing a mathematical paper, it is often a good for readability idea to dissect the proof of a big theorem into a series of lemmata. In all likelihood, some of them will end up being sufficiently localised and technical that no one has ever stated or proved them in the same form. Some, on the other hand, will be very general observations which have ...


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Ask yourself a simple question: Did you plagiarise? Assuming the answer is no, there's no need to check whether you plagiarised.


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A neat way around this would be to say it is easily/ readily shown ... That way you make clear that this is really only a step along the way and make no claim to novelty and it is a common hand waving technique. You could even relocate the bulk of the Lemma to the appendix if you feel that the workings don't add anything. Though I'd ask if it is such an ...


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I am basing my answer on some assumptions: Those results are really well-known; Those results can be found in a standard literature on the topic; You need those results, as you (as a decent mathematical thesis would) begin from the definitions and need to lay some ground work, but your actual contribution is later and definitely not here. I would bring the ...


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Perhaps, they may be best classified as 'mathematical folklore'. Let me suggest that citing it as 'mathematical folklore' would be incorrect. Based on what you have said in the question, you have proven the result (you know it to be true) and you also are not aware of a proof in the literature, although you believe one exists. However attributing a result ...


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For completeness, no it is not plagiarism to state a theorem and prove it without knowing whether that theorem is available already in the literature. Plagiarism is the purposeful appropriation of someone else's words, claiming that they are your own.


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You do need to make some effort to find in the literature a result you think is known, but after that what you propose is common and I feel is fine. I do it sometimes. In such a situation, I tend to say ``the following is probably known, but we include a proof for completeness.'' Even if you find the all your background lemmas in the literature, it might ...


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I'm not sure where you heard that you should only cite "credible" sources. Credibility is a judgement call, best avoided. You should always cite things that you have found and used, even if they were ill formed when found. The ideas are those of others that you have developed further. But the idea didn't originate with you, so you are open to ...


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If a statement of purpose or a letter of recommendation is so generic that it could legitimately have been written about two different applicants, it's a pretty bad one to start with. I honestly don't see the point. And to answer the question, no, to my knowledge, there is no such database.


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