New answers tagged

-1

Just use the standard BibTeX way out: "Last Names as you Want them Written, First Second Third Name". I.e., "de la Carrera y Cajal Rodríguez, José Miguel Antonio" (very much made-up Spanish name).


2

Arxiv metadata and fulltext have been made (more easily) accessible in 08/2020. https://blogs.cornell.edu/arxiv/2020/08/05/leveraging-machine-learning-to-fuel-new-discoveries-with-the-arxiv-dataset/ https://www.kaggle.com/Cornell-University/arxiv The full set of PDFs is available for free in the GCS bucket gs://arxiv-dataset or through Google API (json ...


2

arXiv automatically ingests publication metadata from many journals and some other sources. So the DOI might be automatically updated for you once your article is published. For a major journal like ApJ, I would expect that to be the case. If that turns out not to happen, then you can update the DOI and journal reference metadata on the version of the paper ...


6

The arxiv has a dedicated field where you can add the DOI. (Note that this will not create a new version.) In addition, most journals will allow you to upload the final accepted version (that is, the version with the corrections you did following the referee comments, but without any copyediting done by the journal), so you can additionally upload that ...


4

There are two options: Upload the revised version that you submitted to the journal (i.e. the one which got accepted finally). But, don't upload the post-produced pdf that you got from the publisher (and did not compile yourself from a .tex); this is not allowed by most journals. Further, you might want to look at the journal's statements about arXiv ...


3

The cs.LG category has a broader scope. As per arXiv's category taxonomy, the category descriptions are: stat.ML (Machine Learning) - Classification, Graphical Models, High Dimensional Inference and cs.LG (Machine Learning) - Papers on all aspects of machine learning research (supervised, unsupervised, reinforcement learning, bandit problems, and so on) ...


7

No, you shouldn't replace the old paper with the new one. Replacements are supposed to be revisions, not "very different" papers. The replacement that you propose would not only revise your contributions; it also looks like an attempt to erase your coauthors' contributions. The change in authors would almost certainly raise a red flag with the ...


-1

Putting it online usually cannot hurt, but do not expect many people to read it. I would only recommend against putting it online when you know larger flaws. Minor flaws should be not big problem, because people know that a masters thesis is one of your first works and probably not perfect. And they probably know that their own master thesis is less ...


2

In my field (cosmology), plenty of researchers and professors post lecture notes on arXiv, and of course many people write and publish review articles which don't contain any new results. So there's no requirement of novelty to post on arXiv. Whether it looks immature largely depends on the quality of your writing. A poorly written review will not be read, ...


-1

Check out this paper: B. Gipp, C. Breitinger, N. Meuschke, and J. Beel, “CryptSubmit: Introducing Securely Timestamped Manuscript Submission and Peer Review Feedback using the Blockchain,” in Proceedings of the ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries (JCDL), Toronto, Canada, 2017. https://www.gipp.com/wp-content/papercite-data/pdf/gipp2017b.pdf


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