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1

If your goal is simply to timestamp the content, then you can create a hash and make that public. That is, you compute a MD5 or SHA hash of your pdf and tweet that, put it on your wikipedia page, or attach it to another arxiv submission. This provides proof that your document existed at that time, without revealing the contents of that document. At a later ...


1

arXiv will keep every version on the website, so people can always go back and see what version 1 or version 2 looked like, even when the paper is on it's 5th version (for example). These are some places where you can put your pre-prints, and then replace them without a version history being visible to any outsider: Academia.edu ResearchGate Mendeley ...


0

Such papers can certainly be accepted by the arXiv system (which does include some very minimal "refereeing" by volunteers, but only at the approve/disapprove level if not also for changing the listing for example from "general physics" to "chemical physics"). However it is frowned upon to submit incomplete work on arXiv. It is ...


2

You can have this functionality without even trusting the hypothetical public server with any of your data treasure. Free public timestamp authorities (which follow RFC 3161) allow you to timestamp your article so that it is cryptographically provable that the article existed before a certain date (when you requested a timestamp from that particular public ...


8

I suspect the relative merits of different approaches depends on discipline and maybe geography, but in my area (interdisciplinary with applied mathematics and business most prominent, North America), a preprint, on ArXiV or elsewhere, should be essentially complete within the scope the authors have chosen for it to have. So you could upload a preprint which ...


1

If you use someone else's work, academic honesty requires you to cite that work. Licenses and copyright are completely irrelevant. If you redistribute someone else's work, then the license is important. That is a matter of law, not academic honesty. The ArXiv license does not permit you to redistribute work unless you are ArXiv; attribution is irrelevant. ...


5

The website you are looking for probably doesn't exist and if it does it's moot because no one will check it. Then if another paper comes along with the same ideas, people will read that paper, not yours. Moreover, even if you have proof, i bet few people will actually care that you came first. (And, pardon my harshness, deservedly so, because you purposedly ...


4

Figshare, for one, has the facility to apply an embargo to an item such that the material (e.g. an attached PDF) itself is not visible to the public, though the content description is. The timestamp is in the History section near the bottom of the item page. It looks like it even allows generating a private link for reviewers to access the material, but I've ...


10

Focusing just on the mistakes angle. Don't worry about having mistakes in arxiv papers, its a preprint service for a reason people know they are not full reviewed papers so my contain mistakes (not that fully reviewed papers don't also contain mistakes). You can always update the version in the arxiv when you realize a mistake. I usually update my papers ...


33

Basically, if I understand you correctly, you want proof of priority without publishing. Well, this problem is well known from middle-ages and renaissance where people wanted to be able to prove they have the earliest solution without revealing what it is (so that if someone finds it, they can prove they were there first). They often used anagrams, today you ...


4

Below the download options for each article (i.e. "pdf", "postscript", etc.) there is a link in very small print labeled "license".


8

It might be best to upload a new version that's essentially a note explaining that there's a flaw in the original. Then when you patch the proof (if you patch the proof) you can post the latest version. Since the flawed original will be there in any case, this keeps all the corrections in one place.


22

No, this is impossible to determine definitively because there is no complete list of publications. The correct solution is for the author to update their ArXiv submission with a citation. The practical solution is to use Google Scholar to search for an article with the same text. You can also ask the author, who will know if there is an authorized ...


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