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0

Mine took about four weeks with PeerJ for the article to appear in both databases. But I think this has more to do with the journal. Journals like peerJ covers wider disciplines are indexed in many subdatabases in WOS for example. Other discipline specific journals thus might take longer.


1

The H-index is largely a function of how many large projects you are involved in. Without having a large number of co-authors who all write papers, it is impossible to be competitive. Unfortunately, Google Scholar considers this the only measure of scholarly success. AdsAbs also offers normalized citations as a measure, where the number of citations is ...


7

In addition to writing papers that others will want to cite, another important factor is simply the number of publications that you have- if you look at the profiles of researchers who have h-index numbers of 30 or more, they typically have total publication counts of 100 or more with a highly skewed distribution of the number of citations. Another issue ...


50

Write papers that people will want to cite. In particular: When you come up with a new concept/technique, write a good explanatory section, so that people will refer to your paper for in depth explanation. Make something useful, like a piece of software or a benchmark that people working in your field can use. Write a paper that people using your work can ...


7

The most sustainable and rewarding "tip" is to do good work which is interesting to your peers, and present it well. All other approaches are merely tactics that will only get you so-and-so far. I still include some of them in this answer, since they might be useful to increase your h-index to 10 in a given timeframe. Self-cite. While a citation record ...


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