New answers tagged

2

when I find some reference and want to check how "good" it is w/o having to read the thing. No. There isn't. You can not check how good a reference is without reading it. Or at least, any method of doing so is some balance of effort vs accuracy, and any method that gave you a sufficiently reliable measure is as much, or more work than reading the ...


2

You can use www.semanticscholar.org to see the extractions of the paper citing the specific article you want. In other words, you will see what and how other researchers use that paper, if applicable. To do so, you need to type and search for the paper you want. You will see a section called "Citations: Publications citing this paper," and you can ...


0

Supposing the person has a fairly unique name (within their discipline), you can search for the name. Google scholar will typically start with the highest cited papers first, more-or-less. Then you can count papers they are an author of. When this count matches the number of citations a paper of theirs has, you have the h-index, up to an unknown error margin....


8

Assuming the question is about status and not quality: Job title is a strong indicator of status. The meaning of each title typically depends on the country. For the US, as an example, named professorships have the highest status, followed by professors and associate professors. The status of the university is also a strong predictor of status of the ...


3

Talking to some other students who went through this before me, I have heard that one should take a class with the professor before asking them to be one's research advisor (I thought this was BS and tried reaching out to profs, but got stonewalled - this seems to be systemic in my uni/dept). Well, take it from a professor's point of view. They received an ...


4

The best signifiers of status in a community will be being invited to give (plenary/keynote) at the (top) conferences for that community, and to win the prizes and awards that community bestows. Having many highly cited papers will often correlate with that (publishing papers other people are interested in contributes to gaining status, high status makes ...


-2

Use Scopus, because: Sure it's maintained by Elsevier, but it also includes non-Elsevier papers. Even if it does not have data from the last year, papers published in the last year probably have not have had time to accrue enough citations to change the h-index of well-established researchers. Alternatively you could use a database such as Google Scholar ...


2

No, finding the H-index from Google Scholar of someone else who does not have a profile does not seem to be possible. While I could not find a source that confirms this, there is no mention of such an option in the help pages of Google Scholar, and the wording strongly suggests that seeing those metrics at an individual author level are one of the benefits ...


2

Incidentally, to answer the question in the title, "scholarship" and "peer-reviewed publication" are substantially different things, somewhat like "understanding" and "novelty" are not at all the same, though loosely connected. In mathematics, in the U.S., for example, "scholarship" is not much rewarded by &...


2

Albert Einstein Just yesterday this article was published with the title "Albert Einstein the mediocre: Why the h-index is a bogus measure of academic impact." Check this out: "let's examine the case of Einstein, who has 147 articles listed in the Web of Science database between 1901 and 1955, the year of his death. For his 147 articles, ...


Top 50 recent answers are included