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9

Note the inconsistency. The exact way of doing this will depend on the style or publication guide you are using. This idea comes from the APA Style Blog, where Timothy McAdoo suggests noting an unintentional typo using a footnote: Linn, L. (1968). Social identification and the seeking of pyschiatric1 care. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 38, 83–88. ...


12

Without sufficient reputation, I cannot post this as a comment; so here we go in an answer... I apologise! 'Beweis einer Baudetschen Vermutung' is orthographically incorrect, as 'Baudetschen' is an adjective and should therefore be written using a lowercase 'b' as 'baudetschen'. If this adjective, however, is derived from a name, it can be written as 'Baudet'...


2

For a research manuscript with a digital object identifier (DOI), associated metadata may provide a title. Alternatively, and for research manuscripts without DOIs, a publisher's table of contents, index, etc. may provide a title. The actual title assigned by the author(s) may differ, and a publisher's usage may vary, hence, there's no "official" ...


1

If your Statement of Purpose is self-contained (in particular, it includes a list of references), you're free to pick your own citation format. Otherwise, you need to pick a format that allows the reader to identify the work you're citing. Using first author et al. probably doesn't help, because that author will likely have written many papers, moreover, ...


-1

We are all living in one world. Giving names is different. So are Chinese names given in Singapore different from mainland Chinese names. If the family name precedes the given name, the original order of names is used in all kinds of references. There is no need of a comma since the order is not reversed. Also, everyone has to cite the full name as there is ...


13

No, you should NOT include this information. These designations are journal-specific and would provide little information to someone not familiar with each of the journal's classification schemes. For example, a short communication in one journal might represent a more impressive paper (because for some journals a very short paper might be, on average, more ...


6

No. The citation guides I know of do not distinguish between types of published contents in journals. They simply use the overarching term of an "Journal Article" (e.g. APA) and do not require one to note whether it's an Editorial, a Review, a Research Article or Short Communication (or whatever of the ca 45 labels there are - possibly with the ...


5

In my field, there is no distinction. Short and long papers are cited the same way. However this may vary by field. To find out if it is important to your specific field, read papers in your field. Do they make any distinction when citing? For example, after you've written your manuscript, take a look at all of the references you cited. How do they cite ...


0

I agree with you. It would be great that simply by placing the mouse over the reference to an equation or graph, it would appear in the form of an overlay. It is exasperating to have to go up and down in search of an equation and then recover the reading point. In more than one occasion I open the same document twice to avoid it, in one window I read, with ...


3

Sometimes it is easier for the reader to understand a image if it is reused Not really. You can go back and forth when reading a text. I see no advantage reproducing an image within the same document. What is the original reason for forbidding this? It is not strictly forbidden. I would call it common sense. The fact that you do not see images reproduced ...


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