New answers tagged

2

3/4 days after the submission, the status changed to "under review" and till now the status remained unchanged. I am in a hurry and need to get the final decision as soon as possible. If you are in a severe hurry, then consider whether or not you can post it to an e-print repository such as arXiv, bioRxiv, ChemRxiv, or even GitHub, or your own ...


11

You cannot speed up the process. Everyone’s in a hurry to get their stuff published so your own situation is repeated with pretty much every submission. More importantly, what are the odds the manuscript will be accepted as is, with no revisions? Be ready to quickly make revisions, and be sure to address all concerns of the referees, and this will speed up ...


1

The email address listed in a publication (per clarification in the comments) does not matter at all, so long as you can read email sent to it. Most of the email you will receive will be from automated systems. I use a unique email address for each publication. These unique email addresses receive many requests for money from fraudulent journals. Exception:...


0

There are several possible reasons for a pre-submission inquiry, including at least: You are still in the process of finalising the manuscript. Adapting the manuscript to the journal’s requirement for a submission would be a considerable effort. This should rarely apply nowadays. The journal has on a long decision process involving multiple editors for desk-...


6

Congratulations on finding the proof! I have looked into your comments and also your MSE post. Here are some remarks: you are mis-attributing the field of your result. It is not 'related to algebra'; modern algebra studies general, abstract features of structures. Neither is it related to operator theory as your tag suggests. If I were to name a field, it ...


0

The OP stated in a comment on another answer: I have posted the result on MSE, see the latest question about Faulbaher's formula. It looks like the question they are referring to is: Faulhaber formula from geometric series and operators? As far as I know, academic journals generally do not accept work that has previously been published elsewhere. According ...


1

Even if the result is not new, if your proof is short (and, by definition, does not require more than what a high-schooler knows), then it might be possible to publish in say American Math. Monthly, or similar. They accept short, nice proofs.


3

You wrote the editor last Friday. The time that has passed since you asked that question is a whopping 1.5-2.5 working days, depending on the exaxt time at which you sent your message. This is a tiny amount of time in the calendar of many academics. Buffy is right in suggesting waiting at least a week.


7

A particularly challenging aspect of writing a paper is the introduction. At least in my field of research, I expect this to contain a reasonable overview of related work. Context ist very important to appreciate the value of a paper. The standard is that this needs to be provided by the author, not by the reader. This was a major challenge for me for many ...


3

Congratulations! Even if your paper contains errors, the mere experience of writing it and submitting it for evaluation by others is hugely valuable and shows superb skill and dedication from you! Please don't stop! I'm not clear if this is something you have already written, or is still unfinished. I am not a published researcher, but I have many friends ...


3

I was in your same position in high-school, and not to come off as discouraging, but the results you have most likely do not settle the “famous” open problem you’re interested in. In high-school, I believed I had proved P=NP by coming up with an algorithm that solved an NP-Hard problem. I even typed the solution and emailed it to a few Professors who, ...


17

I'd recommend not trying to submit a paper to a journal without guidance from a more experienced academic. That academic doesn't have to be a professor; anyone with more experience with the field than you should be good. You've contacted the professor, which is a great start. If they don't reply, you can/should also talk to your teachers. Since you're fresh ...


11

Anyone can publish a paper, regardless of age or affiliation, provided that it meets the (rather high) standards of a journal. The standards will include things like understandable writing, but more important is whether the paper solves an "interesting" question in a "novel" way. "Interesting" can mean new and important, or ...


3

Someone at the journal will make a judgement as to whether it is in fact an improved version of the same paper, or if enough has changed that it's a different paper. This is a judgement that can only be made by someone in your field who understands your work. We cannot judge this, and the judgement cannot be made using some automatic rules. If you think it ...


0

I'll give a specific example of a fairly high-ranking robotics journal (no affiliation). Robotics and Automation Letters (RA-L) is a recently-started journal of the Robotics and Automation Society, which is coupled with flagship robotics conferences (IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), the IEEE Conference on Automation Science ...


6

When a journal is set up on ScholarOne, one piece of information they provide is an EO email address. When you filled out the form, ScholarOne sent the email to that address "on behalf of" you. There is no direct way for you to view this correspondence through the system. You could contact the EO office again, and ask for a copy to be forwarded to ...


2

Institution usually refers to the institution that the work was done at, or at least who pays the bills for that particular author most of the time. For many authors this is the only institution they are affiliated with, so it really makes no difference. Affiliation refers to other organizations that the author is affiliated with. For instance, say I am a ...


2

In my field (physics) we put both affiliations and we do not necessarily specify which is the current one, which I guess is not very smart. This would probably be acceptable Leo Yoon$^{a,b}$ ${}^a$Previous affiliation, ${}^b$Current affiliation Email: leo.yoon@affiliation.current.edu So they know where to find you and your former institution gets proper ...


4

Most of the work was done at affiliation A and your adviser for that project was at affiliation A, and now you are at affiliation B. I disagree with Buffy's answer, which is to list your affiliation as B rather than A. The most common approach is to put affiliation A with a footnote that says: "Present address: affiliation B", or to put both ...


2

Generally your affiliation is the institution with which you are currently employed or a student. University A is a "prior affiliation", unless you still have some formal relationship with them. Your dissertation/project/manuscript may need to acknowledge A for any support for research leading to a paper, but your affiliation should be B. The ...


3

This kind of error won't affect acceptance. Chances are you'll simply get to fix it during copyediting/typesetting. An eagle-eyed production editor might notice you are changing nontrivial aspects of the paper and confirm with the editorial board that the change is OK, but if the error is as simple as you describe, there's nothing to worry about. If you had ...


0

This entire situation is strange: to start with: you submit a paper that apparently lacks a good introduction with motivation for the research, a conclusion, and references the reviewers did not notice the lack of references, a big and obvious problem with the paper (but hopefully easy to solve) the reviewers did not comment on the lack of presence of a ...


3

I think Tom R's answer is idealistic and doesn't match what I learned when I interviewed several established researchers about why they submit to X journal instead of Y. Impact factor. Love it or hate it, it still factors in the minds of most people. Scope. Some journals are simply better than others for certain papers. The two journals you mention are ...


10

I think impact factor should be almost at the bottom of considerations of how to choose a journal. If you want to read more I suggest this nature article. The first test should be to make sure you are submitting to a journal of good standing. For example you may want to ask is it a predatory journal. Once that's out of the way then I think the most important ...


1

It sounds like he's too busy but doesn't oppose the idea of having the paper submitted. I suggest that you define the timeline yourself, while giving him the chance to "opt out" of it: Dear Prof. X, thank you, again, very much for your feedback and advice. Since I have addressed all open issues, I plan to submit the article on <date in 2 or 3 ...


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