If you need help with online teaching or other challenges in academia arising from the COVID-19 crisis, we have prepared this FAQ to get you started.

New answers tagged

2

Scopus is quality-curated, i.e. getting indexed by it is not meaningless. However, it is not as selective as the Science Citation Index, which remains the gold standard. Therefore you are better off publishing in a SCI-indexed journal if you can. Arguing with your professor is unlikely to be a good idea in any case - they have much more experience than ...


2

If a journal wanted to impose such a rule they would most likely state it plainly. But I think that is very unlikely. It isn't the qualifications of the authors of a paper that make it important, but what the paper actually has to offer. Of course, editors like to know that the authors know what they are writing about, but that is the job of the reviewers to ...


0

There is unlikely to be a written rule stating the requirement of a PhD holder in the journal policy. There are two possible explanations for this action: (1) The editor felt the need to desk-reject based on reasons other than author qualification (relevance to journal for instance), and simply asked for the title so that the rejection mail would address ...


2

No. You can see the decisions of papers submitted to your journal, but not to other journals, even if they are by the same publisher. An employee of the publisher with access to both journals might be able to, but not the members of the editorial board.


-2

If both journals are in the same publishing house then both editors have access to the same database of records so yes. Editor B probably searched the database for your name as a first step and the result of editor A was listed... Only a guess but possible.


0

If the papers were suggested by the reviewers, there are high chances that those papers were from "reviewers" and they wanted to increase their cite count. In my experience (non IEEE Access), I cited those papers and the paper got accepted. No need to cite additional papers (OTHER THAN THOSE OFFERED BY THE REVIEWERS). I think because the contribution you ...


-8

Well, by your own words, they want your paper to go through their peer-review before being unleashed on the world. On the one hand, they think it will make Arxiv, and the world, a better place. But more than that, they want to prevent headaches, drama, and confusion, whereby a hypothetically crummy version of your paper co-exists in this universe with a ...


5

Waiting for them seems like a lost cause. Unless you have signed some release or given them copyright, the paper is yours. You can submit it as you like. But submitting it minutes after notifying them of a withdrawal might be hasty. A few days wait is suggested. But they don't seem to have a very good record of corresponding with authors.


-1

I think the comments and changes should have been accepted and then sent to the reviewers for them to appraise as necessary.


58

what is the logic between allowing preprints, but not author-submitted papers? There is no logic behind this. It is part of the culture of publishers who want to restrict access as much as possible, so they can profit from selling closed-access research. If it were just up to publishers, I don't think IEEE would allow preprints, either. But they make an ...


1

An acknowledgement would be proper: Researcher X was previously funded in this research by Z. It keeps it clean. While the company may no longer exist, its principals still do. In general, acknowledging liberally is preferred over being stingy.


1

It is definitely possible, and I would actually encourage students to do so if they intend to pursue an academic career. I had the privilege of having incredibly supporting mentors, and published the work for my BSc thesis as a first author in an IEEE journal (not even a member). The bio explicitly stated my BSc status. Being thrown into research like that ...


0

I routinely use the Open Science platform (see https://osf.io/) for things like model code, simulation results, data dictionaries, supplementary figures and all the other extraneous materials that are needed for reproducing results. I haven't submitted to IEEE but I have had no problem with any of the journals I do submit to. The way it works is that you ...


2

TL;DR It shouldn't matter that much what their degree level is. Your affiliation will probably make the most difference, to the extent that it makes a difference. When I was an undergraduate, I had a job as a research assistant in our chemical engineering department. We did not have any graduate research assistants at the time in our group, and we ...


15

I published multiple papers with my BSc and MSc students. Some loose observations: It is easier for you, the advisor, to write the manuscript, even if the student has already written their thesis. Proper scientific language with very concise and controlled wording is a matter of exercise. Your student might have not enough of it, even if their thesis is ...


12

I have several (3) papers published in good math journals, where the research was done jointly with either a BSc level student or below. I expect three more papers where my former master student is a coauthor, where one of the papers is the continuation of his masters thesis. There are no issues whatsoever, in my experience, only quality matters. I suggest ...


-2

Nobody cares about the degree of the student. Often in the US, you don't even have the whole comma Ph.D. thing* and people just figure the asterisked (communicating) author is a PI, professor, with Ph.D. and the others are postdocs or grad students (i.e. pre Ph.D.) But they could even be other PIs in a subordinate role. Really unless the reviewers or ...


34

But according to our university licensing, consulting does not lead to any authorship for the mentor. You may want to consider double-checking what exactly that means. It's highly likely that your university does not forbid you to be co-author of a paper written under your supervision if you contributed intellectually to the paper, which is the case if the ...


24

Journals do not care about the credentials of the authors. They care about the quality of the paper. A low-quality paper by a BSc student will be rejected, just as a low-quality paper by a full professor will be rejected. [You can find other questions on this in the forum.] The main point here: they will not accept a bad paper just because it is written ...


0

I don't agree with @Buffy that it was a lapse! It was bluntly unethical. If you are in a situation where you don't need your advisor's approval or recommendation, you might want to consider filing a complaint to the ethics committee of your university. Of course, contact him first and demand that he will add your name. I am just a MSC student, but I don'...


4

This kind of question ais a "catch all" in case there is something you wanted to add that did not fit in any of the other questions in the submission. If there's nothing you can think of that was not already covered in the rest of the submission, just leave it blank. I have now submitted a number of papers on submission sites that use a question like this, ...


3

Well, if you don't have anything to say to the Journal Office, then the logical approach is to just leave the field empty. And if you there was something you wanted to say, then that's the place to put it! A typical thing people might want to put there is that they think that a particular editor would be a good fit for the article you're submitting. Another ...


3

Don't obsess over it. Dear Editor is fine unless you have already corresponded with them. In fact, if you direct it to an individual by name it might well be handled by someone else - especially in a large organization. Eventually you may get the name of someone who is responsible for managing your paper. Then you can be a bit more personal.


6

It doesn't really matter who submits it, since it's just an administrative procedure. What matters is that the authors and co-authors are properly listed in both the manuscript and the submission system. In every submission system I ever used, you have to define who is the main author and who are the co-authors, and there's usually an option to register ...


4

It is common for more junior researchers to submit papers, since the submission procedure is an administrative procedure which more senior researchers don't want the burden of. Before submission, it should be agreed upon where to submit. It is also useful to establish which authors want to be included email communication, if supported by the venue.


0

What a journal will publish is up to them. So, whether is is a problem is up to the editor(s). There is an advantage to readers if the two articles are in the same journal, but also if you just publish a single long article. I doubt that it matters much for your reputation whether the two articles are in the same or different journals. Having two papers ...


2

Post-deadline submissions, at least within optical communication, are also intended for "new and significant material in rapidly advancing areas". From the OFC 2020 website: Postdeadline submissions are not an opportunity to submit a paper after the published deadline, but are intended to provide those with late-breaking work an opportunity to submit ...


1

Scientific publishing and peer review, no matter what anyone tells you, is very unfair. Therefore, double-blind vs. single-blind (or open) peer review really depends on which choice you think tip the scales in your favor (or at least tip it less in favor of rejection). The pro of double-blind review is that nobody will judge you based on who you are, your ...


5

Generally speaking journals have multiple issues on some schedule from weekly to annually. A paper can be submitted at any time. The review process will then proceed and the paper may be revised on recommendation of reviewers. When the paper it ready for publication, an editor (managing editor) will schedule it for some future issue. So, there is no real ...


2

I will start from the bottom; No you should not worry. Without knowing your field, a PhD topic needs several months to get well defined (even though, things can change after) after reviewing state-of-the-art. So, I think you cannot say anything about your status and it is logical that you don't have any submission. For the other questions: I've looked at ...


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