New answers tagged

3

I doubt that any plagiarism checker will help you here. First, the 30% rule is not a standard measure, and it is difficult to judge in any case. While it may be a standard for some journal, it isn't 30% of the "words" that is important, but that the new work adds new "ideas" and/or "results" that an editor or reviewer would ...


19

It doesn't look amateurish. In most journals I know, the phrasing is not "this work was not supported by any funding" but rather "this research received no external funding". And it is a pretty common thing to disclose. At least in Germany, a lot of university PhD and other positions are funded through external grants. Any publication as ...


4

It looks amateurish to state that your work was not supported by anything. It is totally ok to just not say anything at all. Lots of papers are not supported by grants. That's likely also consistent with the journal requirements: the require you to list your sources of funding. The list just happens to be empty in your case.


0

Personally, I would advise against submitting these two papers simultaneously, precisely because you still seem to be (relatively) inexperienced in terms of getting papers published. You could quickly get into a number of tricky situations, for example: (1) You submit both papers at the same time for different journals, but then you receive from both ...


2

This depends on the policies of the specific journal you are submitting to. Most journals will permit authors to upload preprints to such websites without any issues, but it is always good to check the journal's policies to be sure. This is what Academia.edu has to say about this issue in their copyright policy: Do I own my work or article? Do I have the ...


1

It's just three sentences but it's quite revealing: They invited 11 reviewers At least two reviewers agreed to review the paper One of them has already submitted the review The other has a review due date that's sometime in the future, and the editor believes that the reviewer will actually submit a review Your editor isn't having trouble finding reviewers ...


3

The main reason journals (actually publishers) do this is purely selfish - they simply want to keep your paper within one of "their" journals. I am almost certain for example that the two journals you mention are published by the same publisher. Papers are sort of currency in publishing since the number of papers published per year is a key metric ...


1

The practice of asking an author to “transfer” a manuscript to another journal for consideration for publication has been used in the medical field for quite some time. It can occur (fairly) often when there exists a “cluster” of journals managed owned by the same group. An example is the American Medical Association, which publishes the Journal of the ...


3

You have two lines of text, and that's really all there is: You can try to parse tea leaves, but you will never know. So sit back and relax: the decision will ultimately come, whatever it may be. To be more to the point, the editor really just says what is happening: They're having difficulty finding people willing to review the paper. One could come up with ...


2

Whether or not a paper has to go through another round of reviews is up to the discretion of the editor. "Minor revision" and "major revision" are gradual, not categorical distinctions and have no guaranteed bearing on how the next round of revision must be treated.


18

It means that in the time interval from when the preprint was uploaded and now, the paper has been revised and this revised version has been accepted for publication at the journal. In other words, the revision and acceptance have already happened, though the journal may not (or may) have published it yet.


6

"Accepted by X" means the revised article has made it through peer review and will be published by journal X, unless some very unusual and unforeseen circumstance arises (for example if it is discovered there is a major problem that invalidates the entire paper which was missed by the referees). The accepted version may still be slightly different ...


3

For your question, it can be inferred that your paper was submitted to one of the research journals published by the American Physical Society (most likely one of the Physical Review journals). So what I am going to say here will be, in part, based on my specific knowledge of the APS journals. However, most of this answer could be applied to a much more ...


7

I find nothing odd that assigning the handling editor takes a few extra weeks for some papers. Finding the correct editor to handle a paper can be harder in some case than others. It is better that the journal takes time to get that assignment right. I had a paper go out to referees and then months after submission it was given to a different editor who ...


3

Is your collaborator employed somewhere, at university or in industry? If so, he surely has co-workers, and their e-mail addresses and phone numbers can be found somewhere in the internet. Try to get in touch with one of them. Call or e-mail his secretary, a postdoc, some other co-worker. At least one of them certainly knows why he does not answer and might ...


6

I am wondering if a call is not an option. You can also call the reception at his/her institute, one of the students, etc. The fact that the deadline for a paper you both wanted out is approaching gives you the right to try every way to contact him, in my opinion. This would also let you know if that person has problems of a sort, though their nature might ...


1

What are good ways to improve graphical skills? Practice and show your work to a colleague who has good skills (in your opinion), asking for their criticism. Is the graphical abstract even important? Not for researchers, afaik. I have never heard anyone complaining about a graphical abstract of a paper they found and were unable to understand due to ...


2

I do not think there is a recipe for a good graphical abstract, but there are definitely some things to avoid. The key concepts of graphical abstracts are: They are graphical, not textual. They are abstracts, which means they are small and brief, not complete. Measure the size of the abstract on the journal website and design accordingly. Top things to ...


2

I agree with Buffy but let me add: I think nothing good can come from resubmitting to the first journal after rejection, but something bad could. If the editor had thought you could further improve the paper and fare better in a third round of review, they would have suggested another revision. Rejecting a paper is a final decision. Arguing with an editor ...


36

(Promoted from a comment.) As well as agreeing with other posters that you might as well start working on revisions yourself, I would strongly suggest that you contact the editor now rather than waiting for closer to the deadline. You can indicate your uncertainty, i.e. that everything might be OK (co-author responds to your queries, revisions get made, ...


1

I personally would start to write the revision. Maybe the person is just on vacation? If your co-author did most of the wrting (as you said), I think it is in his/her interest to get this article published. Basically you have these two outcomes: Your collaborator answers before the deadline Your collaborator doesn't answer before the deadline So think ...


7

Certainly you can start on revising yourself while you continue to try to reach the other person. If you reach them you can give them what you have done and continue from there. Perhaps you can reach them through a third party if you know of someone, perhaps someone they work with. Doing nothing seems like the worst option. But if you have to send in your ...


8

I'm not sure you can get a definitive answer here, but my suggestion would be to let the paper stand on its own and just submit it to a different journal without further comment. I don't see anything wrong with making a suggestion to an editor, but suspect that it is likely to be rejected. If you give them full context then I think it is even more likely to ...


3

A conflict of interest is when you (the person with the conflict) has an interest in the results that counters or competes, or appears to counter/compete, with the desire to discover the truth. The fact that the co-authors are siblings, doesn’t in itself, cause a conflict of interest. In fact, I find it rather difficult to come up with a hypothetical ...


-1

In your particular case, your work got accepted at an IEEE conference. Congratulations. IEEE has a relatively extensive website on author ethics. It doesn't seem to mention affiliations at all. Obviously, what you put into the paper should be correct, though. But what is the role of putting the affiliation on the paper? After all, you speak for yourself, not ...


31

There is already an assumption that authors working together have some level of positive relationship - whether colleagues, advisor/advisee, or relatives. These things need not be declared, because they don't influence the content of the work besides all the authors standing by it (which is a minimum requirement for even submitting the paper). If a sibling ...


3

Circumstances can differ, but generally, unless you're in a sort of time trouble to get it published, it's never wrong to try a higher-impact journal first. In the worst case, you paper will be rejected by editor (and not sent for peer-review), which means that you won't lose too much time and will be able to submit it elsewhere. Of course, it does not mean ...


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