New answers tagged

1

Almost certainly, but you need to take a couple of precautions. It is likely that you gave up copyright to the summary article so you need to assure that you don't infringe that copyright. The easy way for that is to let the editor of the original know that you intend to submit and get assurance that they don't object. Perhaps they will issue you a specific ...


4

Just ask for an update and an estimate of when it might appear. There isn't any special form for that. But "future issue" is pretty nebulous. For a print journal there are issues of finding a proper "fit" for the paper depending on the topic and even the page length. And yes, you should answer emails. You've been assuming what they should ...


1

Yes, use again the same superscript as before. Here is a random example from JAMA Network Open (this paper at p. 5). Note the repeated use of 1 or 24:


1

If they permit it then feel free to do so. The worst that would happen is that the update is rejected and the current version is published. Especially so, if they say "option to edit". Of course, an edit that would seem to require another round of review or that changes a major result will have serious issues. But a "minor mistake" ...


2

If you’re asking about publishing a paper using papers downloaded illegally, it’s nearly impossible for anyone who reviews your work to know whether the papers were illicitly obtained. It’s not illegal (the cops won’t come after you), but conducting research using illegal sources almost certainly violates your university’s code of conduct. If you’re ...


2

I think you need to consult a lawyer for this, but it isn't the publishing that is illegal, per se. How you acquired certain information might have legal implications, and how you quote and cite might have ethical implications, of course. But both of those are independent of publishing. Republishing copyright material is illegal in a lot of places, but I don'...


1

The conference's important dates precisely mention both dates, namely the first and the second submission rounds. Although I understand your worries, I do not explicitly see on the CfP that the two overlap. So I would suggest you to move as you planned. But! In any case, since those sensitive matters are not well defined, you can easily send an e-mail to the ...


2

Yes, they are still in print. The issues through 2019 can be found here.


4

I suggest that you add your remarks to the figure caption. Its purpuse is to help making the figure understandable. A footnote reference in the figure can easily be overlooked, so I would not recommend it.


2

arXiv is a public repository/a preprint server for research papers (that are either under review or currently being worked on. There are other such servers hosted by publishing houses as well like Elsevier's SSRN or MDPI's preprints. In accordance with your question to the following paragraph: On a related note, unrefereed on-line pre-prints are not assumed ...


4

There are a number of explanations, but the most likely two are carelessness or a non-native English speaker who is assistant to the editor. In a lot of places like, for example, NYC the workforce is composed of people from many lands. And some high end journals may have a widely distributed (world wide) staff. So, some awkwardness with the language can be ...


0

Yes, of course. But before asking, make sure to thoroughly check their website to ensure they have not already answered your question; For example in the "Aims and Scope" or a similar section. Most journals have one. If even after reading this section you are not sure, ask them. I have done this several times. It will save you at least a couple of ...


0

Absolutely! The term you are looking for is "presubmission inquiry" and they are fairly common, even encouraged. For example, Current Biology writes: The editors strongly encourage authors who are interested in submitting work for potential publication in Current Biology to send a presubmission inquiry prior to any formal manuscript submission. ...


2

Worrying about other people publishing your paper isn't something you should do. One, it's not in your control, that'll happen if it has to happen. Two, even if it does, there are always other parameters which can differentiate the paper. This conference says you can post it to Arxiv, so go ahead! But I don't really think it'll stop someone else from ...


2

These things vary with the conference, but it is likely that you can make the change now if you contact the program chair or other conference official. There will usually be a later date at which final versions are required for accepted papers. But if the paper hasn't been accepted yet, then contacting them might prevent a rejection. In any case someone like ...


0

I recently attended a seminar by an editor opening a new journal in an established (and high-profile) series of journals in my field. She highly encouraged authors to contact the editors of the journal before submission- the goal of the journal is to publish research that fits the scope of their journal- if you're not sure whether your paper is a good fit, ...


0

As others wrote, you don't have an obligation to ask the potential referees for permission to suggest them to the journal. However, I don't think asking for permission is problematic. I asked some people for permission. Some of them agreed, some of them refused, saying my work is beyond their area of expertise or interest or that they did not agree with my ...


25

The exact times when preprints go online depending on when they are submitted are documented in detail on the website. There is also this site showing the time until the next deadline.


6

It's acceptable to ask, but make sure you have a concrete question that doesn't amount to "is our paper going to be accepted" (because answering that question entails the full peer-review process). For example some things you could ask about are whether your paper is within the scope of the journal, or whether the length is appropriate. Do note ...


14

To give you some context, out of my 13 journal papers I asked the editor twice. Once it was a regular issue, once it was a special issue. Once the paper in question was accepted afterwards, once it was rejected and landed elsewhere. I wrote typically something along the lines of: Dear %editor_name%, I am considering to submit my paper "On the ...


8

It is fine to do this although prior research is usually an implicit first step: if you request is not serious, you may not get an answer. A good start is by looking at recent back issues to see if material on this general topic has been published in that journal. Another good sign is that some of the cited literature in your work was published in your ...


7

First, you should check available materials on the scope of the publication. They might answer your question. But, you can ask, and it isn't creepy. But, if the editor is busy, or your email is too detailed, you might not get an answer. I suspect that editors get more of these requests than they'd like, actually. The editors of many (most, perhaps) journals ...


17

As an author, you should never ask someone's permission before suggesting them as a reviewer. This prevents a situation where a reviewer thinks you are offering a bribe. While this is unlikely, you should not leave any room for confusion. There might be rare exceptions where you are required to ask for permission; I encountered this once and it was a waste ...


13

It's not necessary. Firstly the editor might not use your suggested referees; secondly, if they do invite them then they will be writing to them themselves, so you writing to them first does nothing. After all, if they agree to referee your paper in response to your email, they would still have to agree to referee your paper when the editor invites them.


32

No. You do not need consent from them. There is no convention to do that. Usually, the whole peer review process is an anonymous one, with the selection of reviewers occuring at the editors' full discretion. The editors have various channels to find suitable reviewers, and they usually do not tell the reviewers (nor the authors) how they came across them.


8

As you probably have observed by now, by reading articles, people generally do not write steps down explicitly when those steps are considered "obvious." This trend is not special to proofs by induction. In fact, this is true at any level, but what is considered "obvious" to an audience of people holding a PhD or with significant progress ...


4

If you are writing for professionals, then the paper, itself, should probably conform to what you have seen in print. That is, a more natural written style. But, for your own work, an outline form may be best in the early stages so that you have more confidence that you don't miss something and that each piece of the puzzle is complete and correct. I think ...


4

Manuscripts should be submitted for double-blind review without acknowledgments, which are added after acceptance in the camera-ready manuscript.


1

Ask your supervisor what steps need to occur to get the paper published. Request that a timeframe be established for each step. Clearly state how much time you are able to contribute to the project (total and within the next month). This is not a hostage situation. This is an all-too-common disorganisation or negligence situation. It can be hard to tell ...


3

What is most appropriate and would give your paper the best chance of being taken seriously by the research community, is if it conforms to the writing conventions of the field. The writing conventions of the field do not include having a list of theorems. Therefore, I’d advise you not to include such a list. Good luck with the paper!


6

If you really don't care about the paper then A seems ok as long as the paper isn't published without you. But you could nudge the professor and then decide what you want to do. If you get unreasonable demands then you can back away which should prevent the paper being published (ethically, at least). But it is possible that your worst fears won't be ...


1

Yes: Figures can generally appear anywhere (except the abstract), unless explicitly forbidden by a particular venue.


4

If the lemmas and theorems are unrelated (unlikely) then a list might be fine. But if the purpose of the paper is to prove the main theorem(s) then giving that purpose and naming just those in the introduction is probably more standard and easier for a reader to get a sense of purpose. So, my guess is that your second suggestion works better. If there is one ...


0

The page you linked implies heavily that conference organisers think the template is set properly. They also provide a sample. Compile the sample, and if it gives better results than the template, use the sample as your template. In any case, don't add additional settings to the template without a consultation with the organisers. It is a lot of work to ...


3

As long as your paper more or less follows the guidelines, you should be fine. They most likely won't reject a paper because the distance between some columns is 10% larger or smaller than instructed. Word counts should be followed strictly though. If something isn't specified, just make sure it's readable and consistent. Regarding naming authors: You should ...


3

The double blind refereeing instructions mean that the text of the paper should have nothing in the LaTeX \author{} macro. All the authors should be listed only on the web form you fill out when you submit the paper. For help setting the proper margins and other formatting constants, ask at tex.stackexchange.com. Although you have never "met" ...


0

Yes, some academics do not realise that students need to move on very soon and the student's future depends on the supervisor's pulling their finger out. It is all too common. In extremis you can submit these papers anyway. Now your supervisor may be funny about you including their name on the author list, and / or they may be funny about you leaving their ...


Top 50 recent answers are included