New answers tagged

0

An option is to use grammar checking tools. Most LaTeX editors do not include this, but you could, for example, copy & paste a paragraph into a word processor and see what synonyms it suggests. I also have good experience with Grammarly, but it isn't cheap and may not be worth it. But it both tries to tell you when your text is repetitive, and you can ...


3

This is an answer that could be applied to almost any question about writing style, and may get dinged for that, but I'm going to add it anyway: Look for examples to follow. When you read papers, take note of ones that are a pleasure to read, and then read them again to see how they do it. People have given some good answers with examples, and I think they ...


4

Very often, you use a "however" because you're describing some developing process of thought. Thoughts change or turn to something else, and this reflects on earlier assertions. But a written document is not a speech - your text does not have to be chronological relative to your thought processes (certainly not relative to your original thought ...


9

Consider the argument structure in the paper. I find that I have the however/therefore problem when I'm writing in flow-of-consciousness narrative voice, rather than making an effort to structure my arguments. So I write something like: Premise P1 Therefore, Conclusion C1 However, Counterargument to C1 Premise P2 Therefore, Conclusion C2a Therefore, ...


2

In other answers, people have suggested using synonyms, rephrasing, or omitting the conjunctions. I would like to add some extra insight on this. I believe that “however” and “therefore” should be treated differently. “However” serves the important purpose of preparing the reader for a contradiction or a problem that will arise following the conjunction. ...


15

Aggressive Pruning I agree with other answers that your repetition of however and therefore might not be a problem in this context. However, I would like to point out another option. These words are usually included as signposts for the reader, but do not change the meaning of the text. Therefore, I suggest omitting them. For example, I agree with other ...


17

I must actively avoid using the words "however", "therefore", etc... every few sentences Says who? There is nothing wrong in repeating the same linking word every few sentences, in my view. Don't let the language majors guilt-trip you into thinking otherwise. That rule is way overrated. If you are writing about matrices, you wouldn't ...


27

It sounds to me like you're actually doing everything that you need to do already. In fact, when you are initially writing a paper, I would suggest that you not worry about it at all. Write things as they come out most quickly and naturally, focusing only on conveying the substance of your argumentation. Only at the very end, when you are polishing before ...


5

EDIT: My answer here does not directly address your problem, but I see it is useful to look for synonyms sometimes, at least we avoid to use same words repeatedly. I would suggest to consider this website to find synonyms (www.thesaurus.com). For example, I have looked for synonyms of "therefore". As you can see in the results, there are a number ...


71

Let me suggest an alternate view. This is in regard to writing proofs and other very technical things. You want, above all, for your intent to be clear. It may be that "however" and "therefore" are the best available words and that they clearly express the flow of the argument. After all, if you were writing the proof purely symbolically ...


9

Both are perfectly normal in academic writing. You can mix things up by using: However nevertheless nonetheless X notwithstanding This is not always/seldom/never the case for... ..., yet, ... Therefore Thus Ergo Hence Accordingly For this/that reason


0

Yes, the are such organisations and rules. In fact, there are various standards for formatting documents, including sectioning. See e.g. the APA 6th or 7th edition, or the Chicago Manual of Style; these are widely used. If you want to publish in a formal outlet, most likely you'll have to apply whichever standard the outlet requires, which could be a custom ...


0

Certainly there are no laws on such things. In general the layout depends on the material and the audience. But it looks like you are writing something as part of a proposal, maybe for a research grant. In that case, the recipient might have requirements for what to include in the application. You need to cover all of those things, of course. And it is often ...


4

The quick answer is yes. Pertinent literature is meant to support your position and build your story. The amount of literature cited usually reflects how deeply and how comprehensively a topic was examined. However, I should say that the literature cited must be highly relevant to be considered as a valid one. It will not be a good practice to pad the cited ...


1

Unfortunately, there is a lot of variety in how much effort different conferences invest into making the information on best papers visible and long-term available. If you're lucky, the website of the conference lists previous best paper winners on their website. Sometimes this only applies to individual editions (years) of the conference. In a majority of ...


0

Identify the top conferences in your field and look to their websites to see whether best paper awards are present and, if so, which papers received such awards.


Top 50 recent answers are included