168

Is it an option to ask M Smith if she would be ok if the first citation were to read as the following? Smith, M. (published G.) 2014, recent advances in foo, international journal of foo sciences 12:56, 427-865 This would eliminate the only reason I can think of for misgendering the person, namely that readers might be unsure whether they are looking up ...


158

One of the primary goals of citing literature is to help others find that literature. Citing a paper differently than it exists in a journal is antithetical to this goal. Unless Smith changes George to Mary on the article you are citing, you should cite it as it exists.


95

This would be an excellent time to use the Latin sic: ("thus"; in full: sic erat scriptum, "thus was it written") inserted after a quoted word or passage, indicates that the quoted matter has been transcribed exactly as found in the source text, complete with any erroneous or archaic spelling, surprising assertion, faulty reasoning, or other matter that ...


93

This is really making a mountain out of a mole hill. Do the thing that will make the author happy. Even hyper famous papers have all sorts of oddities and mistakes in them; it is likely that nobody is even going to notice this. On the subject of citations:


56

Do you have any advice on how to handle this situation? Name them exactly as in the publication, using the old name for publications before the name change and the new one for publications after the name change. Your scientific handbook requires that, the conference organizers or journal publishers (or the citations style1 they mandate) will probably ...


46

Some citation styles allow you to use a long dash in place of an author name if the work you're citing has the same author as the preceding one. It's stylistic choice.


44

I advise you strongly to use their new name and gender. Especially in the period right after the change, she's very sensitive about this. It's very upsetting when people remind you of your previous gender and cite you with your previous name. After thirty years, it doesn't matter that much. Today, I wouldn't care any more. I ask of you to not consult the ...


42

Conceivably the reviewer objected to the non-mention of peoples' names, thinking that should write "guided by J. Doe [12]" or "guided by [Doe12]" or "... by [Doe2011]"... Something in that direction would be my preference, also, since numbers in a bibliography are completely artifactual, not really adding any information. Names are far more informative. But,...


39

While mathematics is not my area of specialization, I think that in your question you are making a general and IMHO wrong assumption about the importance of the name, appearing in the "et al." construction. Essentially, this construction is used only for the purposes of convenience (brevity for readability) and not for implying the amount or importance of ...


38

Do not correct it. The purpose of references is to help readers locate your sources as easily as possible. Correcting titles might give the impression that you are referring to another work.


37

Very similar things have happened previously. The following really happened, but the name has been changed. A Russian whose papers had been translated under the name Chaikovskii suddenly started publishing papers in English under the name Tchaikovsky. So his papers in old translated Russian journals all have the name Chaikovskii, and his papers after he ...


34

Can cited works hold grammatical positions in sentences? I recall a couple of discussions on this also here on Academia.SE (at least in comments). For many people, the answer to this question is a sound no. However, if you read a number of articles across different fields, you will find that for many other people the answer is, actually, yes. Unfortunately, ...


34

You should indicate what the typo was and that you corrected it. This will prevent your readers getting confused if/when they look up the reference, and related annoyances (e.g., the referee accusing you of making an error, your professor giving you a bad grade, or people generally just thinking you are sloppy). Noting the correction will also create a ...


32

First of all, almost nobody formats their references by hand. Typesetting systems such as Latex have a tool for auto-generating references, for instance from a bibtex file (which is essentially a local database of papers that the researcher often cites). Entries into this file are also not really manual in most cases, as bibtex entries for papers can usually ...


30

It isn't exactly hard to do references by hand, in any word processing system, just boring and a bit fiddly at times. However, given the number of questions here on references it isn't like the citation managers aren't fiddly as well. Having in the deep dark past written citation handling/numbering preprocessers/code for nroff, spinoff, and straight TeX (...


28

Since one does not even cite other academics as "Dr." and "Prof.", I rationally tend to think one would not cite "Sister", "Mullah", "Guru" or whatever religious role may have a specific person. However, different bibliographic standards may have different suggestions and I am not aware of the details. EDIT: ...


27

I would always prefer the original title of the paper (only ignoring all-caps or similar), even if it contains spelling mistakes, as this is the most likely search term, somebody is going to use (and not all search tools do autocorrections). This in particular applies to titles in spelling conventions that readers might not be familiar with. A German paper ...


27

In the example given, you are citing the specification, not the device. The same is true of the Ferrari. You are going to say something(s) about it, such as horsepower or wheelbase. So, find and cite the specification(s) needed. Edit: For the TrueRNG, you cite the web page, if that's the best information available, using whatever your discipline's ...


27

Quod vide, q.v. in short. I agree with the other commenters though, its pretty obscure in English writing.


26

It's a good idea to take a step back here, and think about what the purpose of the bibliography is. Ultimately, it is supposed to allow a reader to unambiguously determine what publication is being cited, and further to help them get a copy of the publication. In order to achieve this goal, I'd argue that specifying the location of a publisher is in most ...


24

Disagreeing with the other answers here, I advocate that you argue with the publishers and ask them to revert the citation style to what you originally wrote. I have personally succeeded in doing so in exactly the situation you describe. Of course you should be polite, and only "argue" if the publishers refuse to accommodate an initial non-argumentative ...


24

Every citation style has some threshold at which it is OK to change a long list into an "et al." citation ("et al." is an abbreviation of the Latin "et alia" meaning "and others"). The particular threshold depends on the citation style, but if you've got half a page of authors it's certainly over any reasonable threshold. You then simply convert your ...


23

Regarding your specific question, the answer is leave it be and don't argue. Most journals follow some house style guide that has been set in stone for who knows how long. This is not a useful fight to have since you will invariably lose. Many style guides offer something similar to what the APA guide says, which is that for papers of N or fewer authors (...


23

This answer refers exclusively to "atomic" citation references based on numbers or abbreviations, such as [42], [ABC+95], or (M09). My opinion described here does not expand to citation reference styles that do not require a fixed form, but instead integrate naturally into a sentence, such as "Picard and Galen had discovered in 2336 ...", thereby indicating ...


23

When working with non-LaTeX users, I've seen people use many different workflows for citation management. The answer mainly depends upon what workflow and software people use. Here's some things I saw: EndNote. The EndNote web version had some nice features for sharing libraries across users. I used this in Grad School to collaboratively do a review of the ...


22

You should not add an initial that was not present in the original publication or expand initials into full names if the author used initials. One reason is the one Peter Jansson gives, namely that the bibliography should reflect what was actually published. However, there's another reason I find even more compelling: respect for the author's choice of ...


22

Do not correct it, if its only in the reference list then that's completely fine. If you actually refer to the name of the paper in yours, you may add "(Sic)" afterwards. (See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sic )


22

You did reference it, it is in the document, so of course it goes into the bibliography. Imagine the other way round: Someone reads the text, finds it interesting, sees that there is more to be found about this topic in a source and then can't find said source...


20

My personal solution to this is using square brackets, as often used for editorial adjustments. (In the sense of Brown: "This is a great idea." → Brown claims that "[t]his is a great idea.") Similarly, you can cite White, J. "A solution to the thee-body problem" as White, J. "A solution to the th[r]ee-body problem" I think it's obvious enough that ...


20

Inline citations should match what appears in bibliographies, and bibliographies should match what appears in the publication record. You can augment what’s listed—for instance, you could provide the original Cyrillic rendering in the bibliography to indicate the authors are in fact the same person—but I would leave the citation uncorrected.


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