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2

To answer your questions in order, and based purely on my own experiences (in pure math in the UK). Some reasons for choosing a particular person as corresponding author might be: they are more experienced in dealing with journals they are less experienced and so need the experience they happen to be less busy at the time of submission they are more junior ...


3

As Ben Linowitz points out, the situation can be very different in other countries. In many places in Asia, for example, the significance of a publication on one's CV goes like this:      publication as first author ≥ publication as corresponding author > publication as any other author. The assumption here is that the first author ...


3

The only "benefit" that I can think of of being the corresponding author - if you can call it a benefit - is that it prevents underhanded actions by coauthors. Sometimes, people from different groups and motivations, who are possibly at odds with each other, end up co-authoring. Or - an estranged pair of advisor-advisee. Some of the authors might suspect the ...


26

My experience as a pure mathematician in the US is that there are essentially no benefits to being the corresponding author. When I was a postdoc and in grad school I was often the corresponding author, but I get the feeling it was mostly because I was often the most junior of the authors and the others didn't want to waste time navigating editorial websites,...


0

My view is that more important than co-authorship is an adequate recognition of your contributions. From what you have written, an honest statement about your contributions may show that it was actually your work which was more important than that of the other authors. (I am not able to address the issue of the coauthorship itself as such -- as important/...


36

Yes, it is definitely unprofessional and unethical to include someone as an author when they do not agree to be one. If you have contacted the corresponding author and asked to have your name removed, and they refuse or ignore the request, all you have left to do is contact the editor. Simply say that you have come to understand that your name was included ...


0

You have numerous replies. I will simply say "no, by my and what I believe are reasonable standards, you are not qualified to be a co-author" and "no you would be very unwise to involve the department head/chairperson." If one of my Ph.D. students felt the way you do, I would counsel them appropriately. If they subsequently went to the Head/Chairperson, I ...


4

I think what I did was wrong because my stipend came from one of her grants. There is no connection between funding and authorship. Providing funding is never sufficient to make someone an author. So you have not done anything wrong for this reason. What is going to be the aftermath of this? I cannot predict what your advisor will do. I can say what ...


2

There are some formal rules around academic ethics in relation to authorship. Vancouver Protocol states that authorship credit should be based only on substantial contributions to: conception and design, the acquisition of the data, and/* or analysis and interpretation of data AND drafting the article or revising it critically for important intellectual ...


7

There are plenty of answers already, so there will naturally be some overlap between mine and what's already said, but I hope to be able to give some food for thought anyways. First of all, judging by the way you express yourself, both on the OP and the comments, you seem to be quite agitated by the situation. Before you do anything, you need to find a way ...


32

You look like you are an expert on a field that your supervisor isn't, and that expertise is necessary for a collaborator to make progress on his thesis. Therefore, I would expect that your supervisor would motivate both of you to work together, so that the other PhD student can benefit from your expertise, and you could benefit from working on a related ...


-3

I have a bi-weekly meeting with my MSc and Ph.D. students that some time is 6 hours long. We discuss ideas and brainstorming solutions; they work on different subjects. When I was doing my Ph.D, I designed an algorithm from A-Z gave it to an MSc student to implement, he published a paper I did not co-author it and did not ask to be a co-author. Why that? ...


3

The other answers cover most of the points but I’d just like to add that submission doesn’t necessarily equate with acceptance. They may have rushed this paper slightly to meet a conference deadline and neglected you in the rush to submit. They may be planning a journal submission after the conference and would like to collaborate with you on this. The ...


16

In the future I’d suggest being clearer about whether a project is joint work earlier in the process. It doesn’t sound to me from your description that you deserve coauthorship, but I do see why you feel shortchanged. The earlier on that you have this conversation the less chance there is for miscommunication and hurt feelings.


75

I am planing in taking it to the head of department. Let me assure you that this is a bad idea. 99 times out of 100 the department head will not intervene in these matters. Moreover even if they do (again, super unlikely), and you get things your way with this paper, I assure you that this will forever mar your relationship with your advisor. I would be ...


23

When the PhD student started to write a paper about it, I asked him to be on the paper, since I felt I contributed directly to his research. But he said I just gave him suggestions and he could add me in the acknowledgments, not as co-author. And he said I should ask my supervisor if I deserve to be on the paper. As a general rule, contributing ideas, ...


84

Actually, I think you should relax and take your advisor's advice. Collaboration is a good thing, and it is a two-way street. You give a bit and you get a bit. I assume you got an acknowledgement in the paper for your help. I don't think it would be appropriate if you weren't. But authorship is a different thing. You contributed ideas. Research seminars ...


0

Ceteris paribus, a paper in which you are the sole author is preferable to one in which you are merely a co-author. However, you should bear in mind that your supervisor might be able to improve your paper, and so you will need to decide whether you want this assistance. If you are able to publish a scholarly paper without your supervisor's input, and if ...


1

If you only have papers with your PhD supervisor as a co-author, a selection commision may wonder about your academic independence; whether the underlying ideas are all yours or all have been fed to you by your advisor. Having a paper without you PhD supervisor (or other senior scientists) as co-authors, helps to alleviate these worries. That this is viewed ...


4

The comments here seem to cover the ground pretty well. Having publications of any sort is a plus. Having lots of collaborations is a big plus and well serve you well in your future work, not just in applications. But in some fields it is more or less necessary to have your advisor, and maybe others, on publications that arise from your dissertation work. ...


-1

There are a few separate issues: A plagiarism issue (professor cannot claim ownership of someone else's work). Thus, professor must include all coauthors. Copyright issue: Professor cannot distribute the work without permission from all copyright holders. Reputational Issue: Student does not want their name associated with bad work. Assuming the ...


2

Unfortunately, your institution is the most likely avenue for recourse in these situations. I believe most journals leave it up the authors to sort this out and direct you to your university or institution for adjudication, despite spelling out the various and detailed criteria for authorship. Even if the editor agrees with you, any authorship changes after ...


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