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3

TL;DR: Having a clear differentiation between first and second author helped us a lot After authoring a paper with a research from a pretty different field I became friends with the first author (I was a co-author). What we actually did was to write two papers: One for the other one's field (biology) and one for my field (statistics). Then both got a first-...


7

"Does author order matter" is one of those questions best answered "sometimes". There is variation between fields, and sometimes subfields. Since you're asking about a PRL, I will assume you're asking about conventions in physics. There e.g. high-energy theory tends to use alphabetical order, whereas e.g. condensed matter and AMO do not. ...


11

There are many conventions and they are mostly field dependent. I'll try to list a few of them, along with a bit of the possible reasoning. I'll also give some personal preferences about such questions, but they are, perhaps, influenced by my own education and career. In pure math and theoretical computer science, authors are generally listed alphabetically. ...


34

Working with friends can be a lot of fun. It can also be an unpleasant experience, and everything in between. Your experience will depend on your personality, your friend's personality, and luck. You may feel more relaxed about sharing ideas because you are talking to a friend. Alternatively, you might find you feel more self-conscious, because it's not ...


54

By all means, go for it. As always when co-authoring: agree on the order the names on the paper beforehand and explicitly. This prevents conflicts.


7

All papers that you have authored or co-authored can be indexed in orcid.


2

This is likely too late for the OP, but in communicating to the university that an alphabetical order of authors is the norm in mathematics, it may help to refer to a statement by the AMS to that effect.


3

The general procedure is to look at a recent book or survey article that mentions this and see what is cited. If not the original author, then perhaps an earlier article. Then look in there, see what is cited, etc. The hard part is knowing when to stop. If I cannot find the original author after a few hours of searching I would stop unless I am finding ...


5

I would start by talking with the librarian research specialists at your institution's academic library. They may have a discipline specialist in your field, or they may have a history of science specialist. They are very adept at using the research databases, almost for sure they can get you on tracks you would otherwise not take.


1

These all seem fairly usual, except perhaps the mandate for coauthorship (more below), and in fact, it's excellent that your consortium has set up guidelines for data-sharing because it can get messy when done casually. You seem to have the perspective that data collection is trivial -- and compared to many other forms of data collection, surveys are -- and ...


17

Since this is your first review, you probably ought to keep the following in mind: It is not the job of the referee to fix the paper, it is the job of the referee to provide grounds for the editor to decide whether to accept or reject it. Presumably you have research of your own, and while it is no doubt very kind of you to offer very detailed instructions ...


6

Of course this is inappropriate. It may also be happening without the knowledge or consent of the sponsoring agency, i.e. it may just be your advisor's perception that they would be pleased if they were to see a familiar name on the paper. However, I don't recommend you cause a ruckus over this. It's not a big deal, it happens a lot of places, and nobody is ...


13

No, it isn't appropriate and is a form of academic misconduct. Those listed as authors need to have made some significant contribution to the ideas in a paper. But this stuff happens. Too frequently. Your advisor's motives don't matter. It is misconduct. However, your relationship to your advisor does matter and if opposing this will poison the relationship ...


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