New answers tagged

0

There is one other thing you can do, after getting agreement from the conference committee. You can put a note in the paper for publication, noting that you have found a serious error and explaining the nature of the error. Don't bother with apologies and such, but just point out where the paper is wrong. This assumes, of course, that you don't have a ...


7

Relax. You're not the first person to make a mistake, and people are not likely to know that you had been celebrating (besides, even if you were ... so what?). The fact that you found the error yourself is furthermore a good sign, since it means you're taking your work seriously and subjecting it to the scrutiny it deserves. Take a look at this. The first ...


2

Major physics conferences do not screen abstracts. Abstracts that are nonsensical are routinely accepted at certain very big conferences. Small conferences may vary. Physics conferences do not permit revision of abstracts.


0

Yes, conferences do reject abstracts for being low-quality, too broad or out of scope. Just as some journals have a low bar, some conferences will not screen stringently; such conferences are best avoided critically evaluated for the networking opportunities that they may provide. Often, conferences that don't screen abstracts are unrewarding in terms of ...


3

Depends on the conference. Small conferences often accept most of things, at least to the poster stage. In some fields, a conference is a place for researchers to meet, so conference papers have little significance. In others, conference papers are almost as important as journal papers and its really hard to get an abstract in. Check ICCV acceptance rates....


17

If your alarm bells are ringing, but the offered position is attractive, then there are ways to check it out without causing problems. Example: The person who's name is on this invite will have contact information outside this particular email. A phone number or email that you don't get from this email, for example, but from their institution or some such. ...


11

Is that normal, or should that ring some bells? It is normal to have received an e-mail inviting me to join the program committee even better that it is for a well-established and renowned conference and that it looks genuine Personally, I would have already accepted the invitation. However, I do not directly know the guy writing to me That's ...


3

Another field-specific answer: Most conferences and journals don't send out invitations by email. Many conferences distribute call-for-papers posters, which get put up on boards you might see at your university/institute, or on people's doors, or even in another conference. A few journals also have CFP posters. A few conferences - more industry-oriented ...


1

In case of doubt, I write a short reply asking if there is a conference website, travel is covered, etc. Usually, I can tell if it is spam or not from the answer. Some companies organizing spam conferences appear on black lists, so you can google for them.


2

For textbooks and self-published material, it is very good practice to follow a convention such as that proposed by Di Carlo, which is widely accepted as the general convention in mathematics. However, it sounds like are talking about a submission to a conference to be collated and published as conference proceedings. This would typically have a review and ...


3

This is likely field specific, but no legitimate conferences/journals reach out to specific faculty members in my field. All of the legitimate conferences/journals put out the call for papers in typical fashion. However, it isn't unusual or the editor of a journal to talk to somebody personally at a conference and ask about the repurposing of a ...


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I am from a mathematical background, so I hope this information is not too field specific but in my experience legit conference invitations travel exclusively through personal connections. So the decision on whether something is legit is very simple: Was is sent to you by someone whose name you recognize as being a researcher in your field? This went so ...


38

The #1 criterion is: they come from someone whose name you recognize as a respected colleague in the field. Or, at least, a conference or a journal that you know already. The #2 criterion is: they look like they are not written automatically. Compare Dear Arthur, I have seen your very interesting article on shiny rocks and I would like to invite you... ...


2

It is unlikely to cause harm for you to send the invitation. It is likely to be ignored.


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As it is an oral presentation go and do your best. This assumes that there is some novelty and your scheduled approach is of interest. You must decorate (verbally) it and gives to the audience the envy to proceed in the same way. You can also represent related previous data and results. I assume that you have a minimum of a solid base, as it seems from ...


4

You don't mention your exact field, but it is very common in the humanities for conferences papers to be, in effect, works (of larger scale) in progress. One of the really nice things about that is that when you present it, you will have a number of people with expertise in your topic listening and often times will provide very constructive comments or ask ...


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