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2

Those types of conferences (including students and PhD candidates) are often designed specifically, or at least partially, for young scholars to test their findings on training grounds. This is more than likely that you do not have enough material, or that it's not original, but that's okay--this is a great opportunity for you to talk about your problem/...


7

In my years of giving and listening to talks, I've never heard someone complain about a talk that was too short. If you have ten minutes of material for a twenty minute talk, that's perfectly fine; there will be a few minutes of introduction, then your ten minutes of talk, then a bit of time for questions perhaps, then everyone will have a few extra minutes ...


6

I will try to provide general answer that might help you later too. You have to ask yourself: what is the function of your talk and who is your audience? I have signed up to give a 20 minute talk at an online conference, which has invited final year undergraduates writing a bachelor's thesis, masters students, PhD students and postdocs This suggests to me ...


9

Was it a mistake to sign up for this talk? No, you will be soon in exactly the same situation you describe, but the talk will be in front of the heavy weight of your topic, not BSc, PhDs and the likes. Why do I say so? because a talk will and must be showing a work in progress, at different stages of completion. If the work is done, then you are presenting ...


20

For the past 30+ years, I've been giving talks at conferences, both academic and non-academic. Many, many times by the time I start writing the talk, I start to think "how am I ever going to fill the allotted time". Then, when I have my first draft ready, it's more "OMG, I have 60 slides, and only 20 minutes". 20 minutes is not a lot. If ...


3

Do you have any MSc project work or the like? I pretty much had the same experience and chose to talk about the project I had done before starting the PhD (at that point this could have been a basis for the PhD but ultimately this turned out differently). It wasn't super original and I felt slightly bad about it when preparing, but it turned out to be a good ...


65

Twenty minutes is not long for a talk. Moreover, most students drastically overestimate how much material you can put in a short talk. Giving a short introduction to the field and how it came about will be more than adequate to fill that amount of time, and would be a perfectly reasonable topic for an incoming PhD student with only four months in the ...


3

I agree with @Spark's comment that minor errors are ubiquitous, and (taking the information from your comment that the errors are indeed minor), you could contact the editor and ask if could submit a corrected version immediately. Another thing to keep in mind is that most journals follow a procedure where they will contact you before publication with proofs ...


8

I can tell you with absolute certainty that almost every published paper contains at least one minor mistake. At the very least, I know that every single one of my papers has at least one typo that survived several rounds of reviews and revisions, and I can always find an error or two in every paper that I read carefully. If the error is not a substantial ...


0

For computer science, it is common to mix these two approaches. At some point in your work, you start thinking about nice little "packages" into which you can wrap part of your work and that are independent contributions to the state of the art...the papers. You have an idea what your paper is about, and then you search for a conference that fits ...


0

What field? What's typical in your area? Ask your advisor. When I was a student, in my area, computational fluid dynamics using the finite element method, things tended to go: talk or poster (with no paper/abstract only minisymposium) journal paper or invited paper to conference proceedings unless it had been a while since we'd been to a relevant ...


0

You should not present results that you know are false: It could lead to others wasting lots of time and money trying to replicate or build on your results. This makes it unethical to knowingly present results with errors (without disclosing the errors). You could make a fool of yourself (and your co-workers): there is a good chance that someone will notice,...


1

You certainly shouldn't be removing relevant sources just for the purposes of blinding; you can just use standard techniques for blinding instead. When I write an academic paper I just write it without any blinding and then at the end I make a "blinded copy" where I cover any references to my personal details or my own papers with [BLINDED], and ...


3

Don't lose track of the purpose of an anonymous abstract. It is there to provide double blind reviewing so that reviewers aren't influenced by the reputation of the author. They aren't intended for final publication and an edited version is what will appear if anything does. You could cite your own work as by "this author" listing it as unpublished ...


2

For a thesis it is normal to include a much more complete bibliography that results from a literature search. This seems to be what you are describing. However, for a paper, it is much more normal, and useful, to include only those you need to cite in the work itself; those from which the current work derives. Don't send the reader astray from the advances ...


1

This is something you should discuss with your supervisor. Conventions vary by field and venue, so your supervisor can give you more precise advice than random strangers on the internet.


1

Pace. This applies even with ACCESSIBLE, enjoyable conferences (like chemistry). Go through your book and make a list of the talks and do some selection of them. Not 100%. Something well short of that. You just don't have the capacity to get use out of the stuff anyways. Look at the list and decide which ones are interesting or comprehendable or close ...


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