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1

As Buffy said, the first step toward "getting a theory accepted" is publishing it in a peer-reviewed journal. Few people will read your self-published book*. Submitting a paper to a peer-reviewed journal will at least get it read by a few people in the process of considering it for publication. Then, if the paper is publised, many more will see ...


5

There is no formal process. But before much of anything can happen, a new theory needs to be widely seen and evaluated. A period of independent verification of its predictions needs to happen. This was the case even for Einstein. But self publishing a book is not a great way to disseminate your ideas as it will probably be seen by very few people unless you ...


0

This might have to do with their lab policy or partners. I am a computer scientist working on problems with a medical focus, none of my clinical partners are okay with releasing code. This is a real problem with medical communities, they even asked me to wipe my computer when my contract was up so that I wouldn't have a copy of my own code. Of course like ...


1

Definitely not necessary and also impractical. Conferences have different chairs and different sessions. Each is controlled by a different person. There are multiple layers to it. In general, reviewers are spread all across the world. And same reviewers do their job across multiple years.


6

No, the reviewers could easily be from other countries and may, or even may not, be attending the conference.


1

Clearly. The main purpose of a bibliography entry is to properly identify the work, with enough information that (at least in principle) your readers can find the work and read it for themselves. If the github.io repository doesn't suggest a citation format, make up something reasonable that serves that purpose. The precise formatting doesn't matter (or if ...


4

Mention it under "conference presentations". A printed title and abstract are not enough to convey a paper publication in a CV.


0

If your paper is already into Google Scholar, it id easy, anyway, eventually, it will (if not yet). You can cite like the following example: Robertson, Eric, et al. "Manipulation Data Collection and Annotation Tool for Media Forensics." Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition Workshops. 2019. Additionally, ...


0

That's very risky. Even if a student graduates and is not caught for plagiarising, he may still have issues after graduation. It may lead to a degree to be revoked. There are a lot of professional plagiarism detection tools (like Turnitin, Unicheck, Scholar Plagiarism), that can easily detect any type of cheating.


5

Note: This answer was merged from a duplicate question. The previously-referenced post on detecting predatory journals is helpful, but incomplete. The duplicate question asked about conferences which were overt about accepted papers being able to be published in conference proceedings with an ISBN. While I cannot speak for all fields, I can say that in ...


4

All four I know of have cost zero. However, they have piggybacked off university licenses that the host institution already purchased for teaching classes and some small amount of university IT support, and various organizers may also have chipped in small amounts of personal funds for small items.


0

Someone has to say it: simply withdraw the poster presentation. Of course, no one wants to do this. But there is nothing wrong with simply yielding to reality: things just did not work out as expected. Then, next time you submit an abstract, bear this one in mind! Best of success with future submissions!


0

From my point of view - you already submitted an abstract so let it be (if your results still agree with the content). On your poster collect all the information that you have in the way that you can explain the idea and steps that were done. Leave the space to describe an outlook with everything what wasn't done yet and what you want to achieve. Conferences ...


0

You may not have a complete set of results, but presumably you have a clearly defined research question and method. You may have already encountered and learned things along the way. Perhaps you have preliminary results. It could be an option to present these and look for feedback on your research question and approach and perhaps even get valuable input to ...


4

I suppose that standards differ, but in my experience (CS) posters don't need to be all that refined. Unless your standards are different, I suspect that you could put enough together to inform people about your project, its current state, and its direction, if not the conclusions that aren't yet ready. Many posters are "work in progress", rather ...


3

I work at Crossref (there are other DOI agencies too) and it looks like the proceedings used to be published by MIT Press and registered with Crossref as book chapters - see search results. But there isn't anything with us since 2007 so not sure whether the conference moved to a new publisher that isn't a Crossref member or something like that? I searched ...


4

Maybe if the aim was to be completely pure, then this would be considered a conflict of interest. However, it's unlikely that your advisor would have any role in the reviewing of papers, though I suppose it is theoretically possible he could put unfair pressure on the program committee. In fact, it is quite common for conferences to allow authors to submit ...


1

The outcome: Some members kindly gave me good comments in reply to my question. Actually, I used some of them in preparing my email to the conference committee. Here, I'll mention what the process was and what happened for those who find themselves in a similar situation: I have contacted the conference with the reasons I had in support of my paper, and ...


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