New answers tagged

1

I think you are writing a thesis, not a user manual for a program. Focus on the technical advances. That is what your thesis will be judged on. I'd suggest leaving the GUI out of it unless you have designed new, and innovative, human-computer interaction elements. Creating such elements has value, certainly, but it doesn't sound like that is the focus of ...


1

The advice to find a different university is probably the best you will get. The standards of the committee are apparently very high, as one would expect. You could appeal to your advisor or to the committee, but it seems doubtful that any other action would work. Even an appeal to higher authority at the university might result in bad feelings that won't ...


18

Yes, it is completely wrong to use ˚ as a degree sign. The reason is that ˚ is U+02DA: RING ABOVE. It is not at all a degree sign; instead, it is (semantically) the ring above the A in Å. The correct character is °, U+00B0: DEGREE SIGN. This is almost the first time I have seen someone misuse U+02DA: RING ABOVE as the degree sign. However, it is very common ...


1

Since you clarified that the "official topic" is research and career progression, I would just let it come up naturally. After you have clarified your general interest in the topic and in doing a PhD., there is an ideal spot for something like: "But of course, before I can do that, I need to finish my master's here by writing a thesis. I ...


26

As you (presumably) continue down the academic career path, you will be buffeted by all sorts of "helpful suggestions" that span the range from ignorable noise to microbullying by those in positions of authority over you. Editors wanting picky little formatting edits, some good some bad. Reviewers with weird comments. Granting agencies and ...


27

For the International System of Units, the units of measurements are defined by the SI brochure. For the degree, unit of plane angle, and the degree Celsius, unit of Celsius temperature, the SI brochure at p. 133 and at p. 149 uses a circle and not a zero. However, at table 8, the circle is rendered with an "o" (probably they didn't have the circle ...


9

There's a single Unicode character "℃" which could save you having to think about all this.


1

Generally a good proposal will need to have a literature review (perhaps brief) to motivate the research. A bachelors thesis will not need to be as good of a proposal as one for a grant that a professor would write especially since like the other answer said, you already have approval so it seems like a formality. My undergrad thesis I did as best I could ...


2

I have gotten informal (but written) confirmation from a professor that the topic I suggested is ok, they even assigned some additional mentors...the thesis is not formally registered yet (it's mandated by university policy that registration needs to happen quickly/before substantial work) and I'm supposed to write a proposal. Write as little as possible: ...


0

My opinion, and for theses in science or engineering: Avoid multiple epigraphs in your thesis. Use either no epigraphs, or one in the introduction and/or one for the summary/conclusion. Many epigraphs in a thesis always see to me to be a little... overly presumptuous, perhaps a little self-aggrandizing. And sometimes you even come off as being a smart-ass ...


7

Using "we" as you suggest is fine. As to the APA, I say a mathematician needs a guide to psychology writing like a fish needs a bicycle. We with a single author is good enough for Terry Tao 1,2 so you can do it as well. There are many specific style issues in mathematics. There are many guides. Here is one 3. By the way, the best time to discuss ...


14

I wonder whether the committee member is not so much concerned about plagiarism per se as whether you actually understand your advisor's work. An undergraduate thesis is supposed to involve, at least in part, the student gaining a certain level of mastery of prior literature (as well as building on it.) This sort of understanding is usually conveyed in a &...


2

It is possible that the reviewer has a misconception. It is also possible that you do. Rewriting things "in your own words" is not a guard against plagiarism, which isn't about copying "words" but about misattribution of the source of ideas. The proof against plagiarism is to make it clear where the ideas came from by using citation and ...


1

The library at your institution can probably provide you with a thesis or two from your field. You can use those as a source of guidance. Your advisor probably also keeps copies of the theses of former students. Again, those samples can guide you and you know they were acceptable in the past. Some universities and some departments separately have style ...


0

Unless there are specific prescriptions in your place (that you should have been informed of) there are no rules. You can do whatever you think is best for the reader.


2

A glossary is a list of terms in a special subject, field, or area of usage, with accompanying definitions. such a list at the back of a book, explaining or defining difficult or unusual words and expressions used in the text. so the wrong place for extended descriptions of what your functions do. Whether those descriptions belong in the text where the ...


0

You can find both master and phd thesis in Turkey from the following website: https://tez.yok.gov.tr/UlusalTezMerkezi/giris.jsp


1

To follow up on existing answers with personnal experience. In my thesis, I linked all notations to their definition. In their report, one member of the jury says (roughtly translated) : "The existence of links between notations and their definition is particularly useful", and later, "We can also notice the systematic of links not only ...


4

Questions along the lines of "what goes where" in a thesis, especially a master's thesis, have a standard, simple answer: ask your supervisor. This is because there are many, many different conventions for writing master's theses, even within the same discipline, even within the same institution, so all that practically matters is whatever is ...


1

The two parts are the index and the glossary. I think this works best when the two are not separated. We go to an index to find out where in the main document we need to go to learn about a specific term. Hyperlink a term to the index when you want the reader to find a specific concept, principle, or formulation associated with the term by going backwards ...


12

Yes you should. But hide all the links: \usepackage[hidelinks]{hyperref}. You cannot expect the reader to start on the first page and finish at the last, someone interested in a particular topic jumps to a subsection and will be happy to find a linked glossary term. Manually linking the terms at the beginning of each chapter contradicts a main advantage of ...


8

As user2768 said, hyperlinking for all mentions is probably excessive. In particular, in a long discussion of gizmos, the reader won't benefit from having a hyperlink at every occurrence of "gizmo". But it could be useful to have a hyperlink for the first occurrence in each chapter (or even each section if the sections are long). If a general rule ...


5

Several thoughts. Think about who might read your thesis, and why. Put yourself in their frame of mind. Then structure your thesis the way you would like to encounter it. Do tell a story - the one that's right for that reader. Do use section number references rather than just "earlier" or "later". If you can look at other theses in your ...


12

I tend to find forward and backward references that provide more context to be useful, such as: "Section 4.3 presents experiments that show that mint chocolate chip ice cream significantly reduces MS symptoms" and "This chapter presents experiments, as motivated by the discussion in Section 1.2, on the effect of mint chocolate chip ice cream ...


5

You shouldn't: Your thesis will be overfull with hyperlinks.


16

The answer varies: Readers will sometimes expect introduction there-and-then, in others they'll expect a delay, some readers will be divided. Regardless, generally avoid will be discussed later and as was discussed previously, use section references to guide the reader.


1

Speaking for the milieu familiar to me, mathematics in the U.S. (probably some people would label the work I do as "pure", as opposed to "applied", despite its applications... but, nevermind, let's go with the cliched labels... I'm well acquainted with them, as inaccurate and misleading as they may be.) And, having been on grad admissions ...


1

Ian Sudbery's answer is excellent, but here's something more. A general aspect is that students tend to think that things are learnt by being told. This runs counter to most educational research. Discovering things for yourself as required while working with a bigger scope (thesis topic) and applying them in turn with more freedom to make own decisions is ...


1

Since, the literature review part is to give the reader a clear understanding of the field that you're working in. It is however required that within the literature review part, you do provide the pre-requisites of the subject you're targeting (so that you can maintain coherence among the sections). Therefore, that's where the theory part would fit-in I ...


6

I can't answer for pure maths, as that is not my field, so what I say might not apply there I guess, but a PhD is a PhD. The first thing to note is that formal examinations and theses test very different things. The test at the end of a PhD is a thesis, not a formal exam (in the sit down and take a paper sense). Thus, your performance in a thesis is more ...


2

If the thesis is relevant, then yes, you can certainly include it. If the thesis disseminates important and original findings on the topic you are surveying, then you should definitely include it. I once read a peer-reviewed book-chapter by a professor that cited a master's thesis (the thesis was neither by the professor himself nor by a superstar).


3

I get the impression from your post that you are confident in your research skills, perhaps more confident than is likely warranted for a bachelor's student. I think it would help to clarify research for you. First, although I would consider any paper in a good journal to be sufficient work for a undergraduate thesis, most undergraduate theses do not rise to ...


6

Actually, it might be essential to do so. Especially if you draw on or extend their work. You need to cite anything you use, of course. Moreover, a literature review, if it is to be complete may need to draw on things that are "visible" even if not formally published. You may, however, need to make it clear that some such things haven't been peer ...


4

Let me address one point that isn't mentioned in the otherwise complete answer of astronat. You have discovered that it is hard for an undergraduate to make contact with professors at other institutions. This is because they are busy with their own work, including giving proper attention to their own students. Helping you adds to an already full workload, so ...


15

There are many assumptions bundled up in your question which I think need to be addressed. Firstly, a bachelor's thesis and a research paper in physics are very different, in almost every aspect (content, length, aim, purpose, style etc). It is perfectly possible to write a bachelor's thesis on a topic and then rewrite part of it as a paper that you then ...


8

No, your dean does not read every thesis or check every reference. And this is true more broadly: when you go out into the workforce, you will find that no one will check every last detail of the work that you do. Reports, emails, software code, legal briefs, engineering analyses, the work a plumber does on your house, the work your dean does — all of these ...


7

For a period of about 10 years, I gave a popular course on introductory crypto, with the relevant math rolled into it. I did also try to be progressive in what I asked students to do... and one feature, to get "buy-in", was to do semester projects of 10-20 pages (topics of the student's choice, with my approval). The enrollment was typically 130+, ...


6

I feel the motivation towards this question is not right. Especially with the OP quoting: "If I insist this statement is from me and my experience. Nothing you can do to prove that this is a plagiarism." If one wants to construct an undergrad thesis (which from my experience isn't mandatory in any college and only taken up by choice), they should ...


10

Realistically, it's unlikely he reads all 10 theses cover-to-cover. But who knows, perhaps it's an element of the job he really enjoys, and prioritizes it. You should write your thesis as if all parts of it will be read closely. It is impossible for anyone to tell you what sections to focus on for this reader. He could be a big methods guy, or he could ...


6

There is a systematic way to perform a state of the art in any topic of interest usually referred to as SLR's and I'll be specific to the field of Computer Science here. You should consider reading: Kitchenham and Charters Guidelines on how to perform a systematic literature review and follow the same strategy. Another strategy is to use the snowballing ...


3

A very rough criteria is to have a read of the 30/40 most cited papers on the very specific topic. Or find a review paper from the last 3/4 years and read the papers citing it. In absence/difficulties in doing that (access to publications, topic still too broad, etcetc), try to look for video recordings of award prizes at conferences, usually the awarded ...


5

Just be honest: Be clear who contributed what. (And follow institutional guidelines.)


0

The answer to this is going to depend on country and disciplinary norms. But in my field (molecular biology/genomics) and country (UK) this is perfectly fine, normal even, as long as you are clear which data you generated, and which was generated by your collaborator.


3

Sometimes there are good uses for synthetic data in research --- this does not sound like one of them The project you have described in your question does not sound sensible to me. "Synthetic data" (also called "simulated data" in some fields) is useful primarily as a way of illustrating how statistical inference methods and other ...


3

If you are using synthesized data and not disclosing that in the finished work, then you are committing academic misconduct. This is essentially the same as using fabricated data. If you are using synthesized data and disclosing that the data is synthesized, then there is nothing dishonest or unethical about what you are doing. It is not the same as using ...


6

I meet with my supervisor nearly every week This sounds like a good level of engagement. Some people may prefer more frequent contact, some may prefer less (and it may vary by stage of a project), but I'd say "nearly every week" is a pretty solid middle ground. Whenever I ask the supervisor on things I don’t understand they never have an answer ...


6

There is a use-case for synthetic data, but writing a thesis when dataprotection prohibits you from using real is not such a case. An example of a use-case would be when the organization that does have access to the real data can create synthetic data with patterns from the real data, and give you that synthetic data. This could be all the "data" ...


0

This is a late answer and possibly moot now, but I'll guess that whoever wrote that was concerned that your field is engineering but your contributions are more likely to be pedagogy. Perhaps they were looking for some engineering contribution and, not finding it (or finding in insufficient) made the comment. But it seems not to be a blocking comment as you ...


9

Synthetic data and fabricated data are different. If you want to use synthetic data, you need to be transparent about how the data is generated and not tailor the synthetic data to support your hypothesis. Fabrication would be false data that is designed to support your hypothesis. Remember that any statistical analysis will be a reflection of the process ...


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