The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.

New answers tagged

2

The email is most likely not dead, you simply don't have access anymore. Ask your former employer to help you change the mail (by forwarding you the confirmation mail, for example).


1

Is it reasonable to ask candidates to create a profile on Google Scholar? Absolutely not. Google is an atrocious entity involved in mass commercial and governmental surveillance, political censorship etc. You really must not require people to use Google's services, legitimizing these practices. Now, to be practical - I'm not saying that you should demand ...


2

Yes, it is completely within reason to ask candidates to have a profile somewhere. What it's not appropriate is to demand they use Google specifically. Besides Scholar there are other alternatives like Scopus, ORCID (mentioned in other answers) or even creating profiles in sites like scholarly, researchgate, or academia.edu. You should leave it to them to ...


4

My question is would it be a reasonable requirement to force the candidates to create a Google Scholar account You should recommend that candidates provide a Google Scholar Profile (not account). In practice, hiring committees are going to go look for a profile. You might as well let candidates know that is going to happen. You cannot force job ...


6

Assuming your university has a subscription, Scopus is pretty good at giving you relatively comprehensive and up to date author publication and citation profiles. It's generally good at dealing with name conflicts. A few scenarios where it might fail: Academics who have changed names (e.g., by marriage). Academics with particularly common names who have ...


12

It is common, and reasonable, for employers to require job candidates and employees coming up for review to provide the employer with any information it needs to evaluate the candidates/employees. So certainly you can ask them to prepare readable, well-formatted publication lists, citation information, and anything else that lets you evaluate their impact ...


44

Have you considered ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor IDentifier)? I have the same concerns about intellectual property protection issues around Google unfortunately. GoogleScholar is also quite discipline specific (as others have said here) and is banned in some countries (China, etc). So to endorse a product that exposes a scholar to legal ...


59

As much as I like Google Scholar, requiring candidates to create a Google Scholar profile specifically seems inappropriate. You are effectively saying you won't hire people that don't use Google. What you could do is make it an optional part of the application or you could ask candidates to submit something more vague like a "citation report" and suggest ...


16

I do not think it is reasonable to ask candidates to create a profile on any third-party platform. Particularly on a google service, taking in account that some proportion of web users have concerns about this company (as well as other large corporate data processing companies), and do not want to get on their radar if possible. Typically, it is sufficient ...


2

To some extent this depends on the field and where in the process you are (although I have to find it funny that 30 applications is considered severe; in math there are positions which get literally 300 or 400 applications). Here are some relevant considerations: Are you in a field which usually uses Google Scholar? Math for example doesn't almost at all(...


1

Google Scholar might not give you this option but your problem might be solved by Microsoft Academic. In Microsoft Academic, there is a tab that shows the references in a very simple manner.


1

You can use the source: operator. For example, search by source:NIPS to restrict to documents published by sources containing "NIPS" in their name.


0

Not through Google Scholar. Instead, see repositories of open data, including Google Dataset Search, Open Science Framework, and others specific to your discipline.


1

John Ioannidis from Stanford has analysed citations pattern. In this 2016 paper he looks at citation patterns in multi-authorship. He commented on the impact of alphabetic authoring in the various disciplines as well. In a recent August study in PLoS Biology, John further explores self-citations as well. In this paper he examines "extreme self-citations ...


Top 50 recent answers are included