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3

I sometimes help edit high-school mathematics textbooks, which have most of the requirements you mention (not citation management) and are published by an academic press that also does university textbooks, so I expect the process will be similar enough. This kind of publishing is a group project. Authors generally aren't responsible for their own layout, ...


1

You had all kind of reasons to use LaTeX in other answers. The extra few you may want to consider: PROS: repeatability: you can compile a LaTeX document several times and when you change a list you will not suddenly have all your headers change font (yes, I had that) stability: the more text you type in LaTeX, the longer the compilation becomes - but you ...


16

A few years ago I was the lead editor for a business engineering textbook. Right at the beginning of the project we had to clarify the question of which software to use. In this field, LaTeX is largely unknown because everyone uses Word. But since it was already clear that the book would have well over 1000 pages and Word has problems with such large ...


8

Over the past few decades, I’ve written hundreds of technical documents containing diagrams, tables, and mathematics, including a 400 page book about computer geometry. Prior to starting the book, I used MS Word for everything. For the book, I switched back and forth between Word and LaTeX 3 or 4 times, and eventually settled on LaTeX. I still use MS Word or ...


32

I've written several books, maybe a bit "advanced", in mathematics, and I've used plain TeX in all (due to getting committed to plain, as opposed to La-, TeX, to be able to manage small formatting details that my publisher 25 years ago could not cope with...) But, yes, some dialect of TeX. For diagrams, I've used xypic, which is by now old-...


5

If you're working with a publisher, ask them. Chances are they accept virtually all major software. TeX is the obvious one for scientific text, but Word is also fine if you know how to use it. If you're self-publishing then it really doesn't matter, whatever works for you is fine. Could have diagrams, images, tables, graphs at quarter or half or complete ...


44

What publishers and authors choose or prefer for document processing really depends on the discipline. Your profile says you are interested in "Electronics and Communication Engineering". For that kind of technical writing I suspect LaTeX is the system of choice, both for you and for your publisher. It's easy to prepare large documents with several ...


10

Publishers of books are normally pretty flexible about what they accept from authors. They don't want to put up barriers. It needs to be something that works for the author and that the production staff can work with. For textbooks there is usually a "copy editor" involved as well as a production staff. The publisher seldom (in my experience with ...


1

Technically it would be "possible". It just depends on the systems. If the free tool has stored or published the content anywhere where it can be seen by other systems, then it's going to be a possibility. As has been said, the terms and conditions of any tools should be checked prior to using them to identify if the content is going to be used in ...


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