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As a professor, I could tell you about how I would feel in that situation. On one hand, I would definitely avoid having a low-quality thesis work: if you feel that topic B is not your best, be honest with your supervisor and tell them. They would suggest you how to increase the "A" part of the thesis, or they would suggest you drop the thesis altogether. ...


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I've personally encountered this problem before, albeit in one of projects for my engineering PhD (which I haven't completed so take this with a grain of salt). What worked for me was to actively poke around the current topic and try to find a new direction which has a reasonable connection with the original thesis topic while still being appealing to me. ...


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This is certainly a question you need to explore with your supervisor. What they would accept or recommend is certainly important. What an experienced researcher would do is one of the following, maybe both. First, they would be likely to consult with colleagues (not unlike your supervisor) and explore viable alternatives. But, assuming that they have a ...


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You should choose people that have worked with you, so they can evaluate how you do research. 1 and 2 are clear, as they have worked with you and are well known. It seems that 3 would not know you well, as he has not worked with you. He is also not very famous. If you have worked directly with 4 at the company, then I would choose 4. Otherwise, choose the ...


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It's fine for the professor to use an email address and letterhead from the college where the professor works now.


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I think that is pretty unlikely, as long as the professor is honest in what they say. I'm assuming, of course, that these letters go to various places, not all the same. But, if everyone is applying to the same university and gets the same letter, few will succeed. But that is at least partly because the number of open slots is limited. I think this should ...


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First, make your SoP forward looking, not backward. Only bring up past actions to support the idea that you are an excellent candidate who is well prepared and motivated and has excellent prospects for success. Your CV explains you past. Your SoP is for the future. But I see no need to mention anywhere that you have a gap. Your transcripts and record will ...


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It is unfortunately not at all clear in which country you studied, in which country you apply and what you apply for (academia, industry, in between). You might try if you haven't already to ask again the retired prof if they could do you this small favor or the other two profs. If this fails, I'd say it's the best to ask both the industry guy (who can ...


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General Answer This will in part depend on what type of graduate program you are looking at. If this is for professional school (business, law, medicine, etc.), I would think that a letter of recommendation from non-faculty would be relatively common. Such a letter (such as in the case of an MBA program) could actually be favored over a letter from a pure ...


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Yes, contact the ombudsperson, student office or office of graduate studies about this. If several of you do so then it’ll probably make the department push the Professor to do their job. Professors often see their teaching duties as secondary but this seems particularly egregious. Hope it gets straightened out. I had a professor who failed to submit ...


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Now the university is asking me to pay back the tuition waiver guaranteed by the sham RA position. Don't do that. US universities should not ask students to repay tuition wavers. Maybe if the student committed fraud, but not because of withdrawal. I cannot request a transcript to show to schools I am applying to this year In your application, say "I ...


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If you can't afford it, you can't afford it. Do not lie to another school, just tell them the truth, without the words "sham" and "bait-and-switch" etc. Tell them you attended for one month and withdrew, and can prove that, but there is now a dispute over tuition, which you thought was waived. They want you to pay 20K, which you are contesting, so they ...


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Since nobody mentioned it yet, the situation in the UK is similar to that of the US - a Bachelor's degree is enough to get you into a PhD programme. The "classical" PhD here is a 3 year position, the students enrol into a Masters (by research) programme and turn in a transfer request after a year, entering the PhD programme proper. A newer format comes in ...


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Academic profile seems to have two meanings. An academic profile in the overall field and discipline is the "status" or respectability of the academic in the universe of academics in the area as implied in this other question. However, that definition of academic profile is not relevant in your current application. Your masters application refers to your ...


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Let me clarify that published may be a bit ambiguous. When your thesis is accepted and your degree is awarded, it becomes part of the university’s archives. A few decades ago that meant a dusty copy in the university library. Nowadays it’s a publicly available repository that anyone can access. So in that sense, yes: your thesis was made public and has ...


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To what extent are these 'available online' Master's theses considered to be published? In academia, published typically means included in conference proceedings or a journal by a publisher in some format (typically a printed book) that has an ISBN. A thesis is not published, under that definition. Nonetheless, an unpublished thesis needn't be private, e.g.,...


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Emails with too vague requests are more likely to be ignored. In Germany, admissions to Master programs are usually handled centrally and specific professors do not have influence on your particular application. For doctoral student admissions, it is the opposite: you normally contact the professor directly and they decide whether they want to take you. In ...


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The general answer for all such questions is no, you aren't too old. Even if you were 60. Actually, masters programs are meant for qualified candidates, not for some age group. The fact that most people continue through schooling without breaks explains the age distribution in graduate degrees, not some hidden rules and not market forces. Your ...


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Generally speaking, any material that is not asked for will not be considered in an application for a postgraduate degree. Admissions procedures attempt to create a level playing field for applicants as well as minimise the amount of time it takes to evaluate an application, and extras that aren't asked for are tossed in the bin. Some places may treat that ...


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I think that given these circumstances it would be fine. You are at university A and you want to stay there and a prof from A wants to write you a letter. No problem, except that the professor may need to not otherwise have a say in your application. There might even be established rules about it. The situation might be a bit different if you were moving ...


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Why so much emphasis on "best worldwide"? Any ranking system involves averages over many things and all sorts of contributions. The only important factor in the "quality" of a program is the quality of your program. Namely the strength of your advisor and the conditions that the program provides for you to be a success. Maybe the best professor to guide you ...


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Depending on your program, most if not all recommend applying for external scholarships prior to acceptance into the program (as if you are already going to attend). For the big government scholarships, the application date for study beginning next Fall has already past, but provincial awards (such as OGS in Ontario) are open until early December. Internal ...


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I'm guessing that the intent of this is to determine if you are in the somewhat rare case of not needing funding. If you can say that you will be funded from other sources (scholarships from another country, for example) then funding is one factor the committee need not consider. But if you need funding, then they also need to find ways to provide it if you ...


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I will give a separate answer for textbooks and for scholarly papers. The difference is that textbooks normally come with exercises to help solidify the understanding of the material. For a scholarly work in a technical field, however, a proven method is to read the paper three times, but with a different focus each time. The first reading is something ...


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Related to your first point, but instead of just writing down whatever you read, you could summarize the material and write down the important points. You could also write them in the form of a blog post (not necessarily public), where you explain the key ideas to the reader. Combining multiple sources (point 3) would be even better -- you might end up ...


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You have to discuss this with your supervisor / advisor. Then you can agree the direction.


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While it is impossible to know what is in the minds of an admissions committee, I would think a few W's shouldn't matter much as long as your GRE scores are strong and your letters are positive. However, I would consider briefly addressing those withdrawals in your personal statement in a positive way (ie, you preferred another course vs you hating a course)....


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"Dear Professor, I am sorry to have to inform you that a number of personal problems have disrupted my work programme. I am now fully engaged again on my work [if that is true] and hope to send you [say what it will be] shortly. [ I advise you against giving a specific date: hostage to fortune]. I should be happy to explain in more detail and answer any ...


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I’m not super familiar with the specific field you’re researching, but I would say that there are three general approaches to methodology in the IT space: quantitative/scientific, qualitative, and artefact-oriented. Each of these general approaches, in turn, would have specific methodologies encompassed within them (for instance the Design Science Research ...


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A methodological approach may refer to way in which a researcher intends to carry out his/her research from the specified or known methods in a discipline


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It is unclear whether you are applying for a coursework Masters or a research Masters. If it is a research Masters, applying for a project that straddles across three disciplines seems unlikely (political science/international relations/public policy). Coursework Masters tend to not have a high selection process as coursework Masters tend to be funded by ...


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There is a difference between academic sanction and academic misconduct. Your question seems to confuse the two. Technically, if the question specifically asks for academic sanction, then according to your definition of a sanction as you say, you do fulfil that criteria and should mark it Yes. However, the bar for academic misconduct is far higher and this ...


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I agree with Solar Mike, at this point formality might not be the most important concern here. I just had a big break, and recently returned to work with my supervisors, my first email to my supervisors after months of radio silence was simply "Dear professor *, hope you are well. I have recovered and am ready to resume my research, I'd like to ...


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