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1

There is a power dynamic in the application process that any applicant needs to be conscious of. There are only a small number of positions for a large number of applicants, which grows to be a very large number at elite institutions. In other words, there is a significant power imbalance to the detriment of the applicant. The consequence of this is that ...


0

Adding to the 'where are you' question - in many universities in Australia what you would do is apply for entry to a lesser postgraduate degree (eg Graduate Diploma) and, if you got sufficiently high marks, you could switch to the masters program after a year. Are you wanting to do a research masters or a coursework masters? Since it's network engineering, I ...


2

Within the UK all degrees will have entry requirements for a course, and I expect this is the same throughout Europe although I suggest you check for yourself. As I dont know the exact situation for the entry, ie university or country, I will answer in general terms. Typical entry requrements are based on a progressive points system, where your previous ...


0

Normally, you should prefer academics, but you want the people who can most honestly attest to your accomplishments and the likelihood of your future success. However, if the MS is focused on things outside the normal academic tracks, on, say, industrial practice, then a letter from a practitioner who also has the ability to fairly evaluate you would be ...


2

It seems as if you have done all you could. If they won't accept supplementary material, then they won't. I'm not sure about the comment on not reading letters, though. It seems like it would be a flaw in the system as long as the letters are in (readable) English. If you get past initial screening you can raise such thing in interviews or in future ...


1

A PhD is just vocational training for researchers, so if a company is not looking for a researcher then the PhD should be a disadvantage; you are not going to hire a carpenter if you want a plumber. In practice, it is a bit more complicated because the PhD has the undeserved stigma as "highest" level of education. So a PhD could still get an advantage even ...


0

There are currently several questions, I will try to answer: Do you think it's possible for me to be accepted into a master's degree program in psychology? Yes. Very likely, if you look at different universities, you can find a master's degree program in psychology that accepts all applicants who have bachelor's degrees.


2

Extended periods on your CV are fine as long as you can explain why they are there. From my understanding, you took as long as you did because you did a full-time undergraduate degree in Mathematics followed by your Masters degree, while still doing TA duties on the side, and then also attempted to do the Psychology degree at the same time. This is a huge ...


0

It's very hard to say from the information you have given. All you have told us is: You took four times as long as usual to finish a bachelors degree. You are 37. You lack focus. You are currently confused. You managed to get a fairly good mark in one class. Working as a TA in other areas isn't a good reason to stop an undergrad degree. I am ...


0

I agree with MPIchael but want to present it from a somewhat different angle. You're feeling embarrassed that you don't know how to do something, that your supervisor previously taught you. This isn't needed. Science isn't easy. If it was, anyone could do it and we wouldn't need to go to university to learn. Consider it a matter of professionalism. ...


0

Your supervisor is there to guide and mentor you during this process. As long as you have done your due diligence and can show the avenues you have tried and why those avenues didn't work, your supervisor will most likely be perfectly happy to help you with what your next step might be to solve the problem. I work in a research environment, have supervised ...


3

I have been working for 3 days...but I am not even close Research takes time, three days isn't very long. (Albeit, I'm unfamiliar with the specifics.) I am trying to use the same code as we did in class, but my model is quite a bit different than the class examples so I can't figure it out. Ask your peers, a teaching assistant, whoever taught the class,...


6

The way to frame your question can have a huge impact. If you did your due diligence and researched some material on this (books, lectures, papers, StackExchange!), and are still stuck, then there is a chance that your questions are more than valid. If you start your email or personal question by: "I have tried three ways to do this.." and then show/tell ...


3

I did this myself, but I've seen lots of people failing. There are a lot of hints and compromises you should think about: What helped me: I've earned many credits from "isolated classes", which I took before actually enrolling. Time is critical when your are not exclusively dedicated to an academic program. So work a lot before the clock starts ticking (i....


2

This is definitely doable, and I know because both me and my wife have done it (simultaneously in fact). And we had kids while we did it. And she was pregnant with and gave birth to another child during the final semester of both of our programs...I would not recommend aligning having a child with this (we didn't mean to, but life happens). Look into ...


6

Yes. It is definitely possible to do Masters or PhD degree while working. I did that comfortably. I wish you success in your pursuit of learning. I achieved M.S. degree in Software from a great university while doing a demanding job in a New York based company. These 3 factors have helped me achieve the degree without hassle: The Manager was convinced ...


4

As other answers have mentioned, it is not just possible to complete a master’s while working full time, but there’s a whole assortment of great master’s programs designed specifically to accommodate career professional students. In the industries I’ve worked in, primarily aerospace engineering and defense, it’s a prevalent part of the culture that early ...


1

I did this with a thesis-based MSc in Software Engineering. It was a terrible idea. I worked full time (>40 hours/week) at a software engineering job. Since it was my first job, I also wanted to be good at it, so I put in more than 8 hours a day. I would then come home, eat, and either work more remotely for my employer or work on my MSc. Weekends were ...


1

Depending where you are and who you work for, maybe your employer would be willing to let you do some of your course on their time? If it's relevant. They might even contribute to the costs. This is not uncommon here (Germany), especially for PhDs, but then it has to be relevant and useful to your employer. In fact, our firm will offer to support you with ...


9

I have completed 2 Master's degrees online with a full time job and 3 children. It is very possible. I did spend several hours a night on homework. I did that several times a week. I did have time to spend with my family as well. It does require a lot of time. Ask yourself this: In 2 years, where are you going to be? It will be 2022. Regardless if you ...


1

At least with regards to the UK - it's highly dependant on the institution and the demands of their program. I had a guy on my CS masters course who worked full time and due to the self-learning-centric course design, he managed to get away with making a deal with his employer in regards to flexitime and compulsory program obligations. He also practically ...


2

Yes, it is possible to do a masters while working full time. The trade-off is that it takes a much longer time to get a degree in many cases. I know that at least one university in the UK offers such courses, as my father was the Distance Learning Coordinator for the Civil Engineering department. There is a short article about what Civil Engineering ...


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At least in the US, there are often masters programs designed specifically for people with full time jobs. Often people attend these programs with support and even funding from their employer. Classes are mostly at night. Your work schedule may permit you to take normally scheduled classes, however. Unlike a PhD program, you also often have the option to ...


9

It's doable (I know someone who did it) but expect it to be hard. You can compare it with your current job - a full-time Masters student might work 40 hours a week. If you do it part-time, you might have to work 20 hours a week. Added to your day job, that's 60 hours a week. Can you cope with that? Some people undoubtedly can but for others it'll be very ...


33

A lot of people in the US do this, actually. Some places have enough evening classes at the MS/MA level that it may not disrupt normal work hours. But it takes a lot out of the rest of your life, of course. It is easier in a field in which you can complete the degree without research, say by coursework and/or creative writing. But if you can afford to ...


0

I'm applying for master programs and the 16 selections are range from dream to match to safe, with about five in each category. Please for simplicities' sake, choose your top one out of each category, and save yourself so much time and stress. That would be 3 recommendation letters. If you must, add 1 or 2 backups and have a max of 5 needed letters. If ...


1

I plan to apply approximately 16 schools and wondering whether they're too many for my recommendation letter providers...It's happened before that a professor of my friend regretted to provide all letters for him because they're too many. You needn't necessarily require a letter to support each application (unless that's strictly required). You may be able ...


-1

Consider how long it will take for your professor to write one great recommendation letter for you. Next, consider how much time it might take your professor to produce 16 fantastic recommendation letters for you. Most people will do a fairly awful job if they feel they are being undervalued or asked to serve unreasonable requests. That you are asking the ...


6

Unlike the other answers, I do not think the professor's time spent customizing is an issue. Customizing a letter does not take that long. Professors have lots of practice. Submitting it can take longer due to low quality submission systems. But writing the first letter is most of the work. The issue is that only one of these letters is worth submitting:...


50

As other people have mentioned, the problem with 16 schools is that a professor cannot, either truthfully or operationally provide customized letters to 16 different schools. By "customization" I mean more than changing the name of the school and program. Good letters of rec use professor's familiarity with their field to speak to applicants' specific ...


33

Tell your professor of your plan to apply to 16 schools, and let them decide if it’s too much. They are capable of making their own decisions without you doing that on their behalf. It’s nice of you to worry about the professor’s well-being, but unnecessary, and counterproductive if it ends up undermining your own success. And as for the professor ...


3

You can ask him, of course. But the problem with asking for too many is that you will get a general letter sent to all, rather than a letter tailored to each given position. I realize this is hard if all schools have similar deadlines, but if possible you should spread it out over time, with your professor's OK. You can also have a different professor ...


1

There is no need to repeat the degree. Just as non-English-speaking students can do graduate studies in the US after passing the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), other countries also have language proficiency exams. For example, Germany has the "Test Deutsch als Fremdsprache" (TDAF). When you apply for your master's degree, they may require ...


0

Unless you are specifically studying something really English related, such as English Literature, there is no reason that language matters at all. Math is the same in Britain as it is in Spain. It isn't an issue. But even if you were studying, for example, the foundations underlying the English language, there is no reason you couldn't do something ...


0

you will find some research centers or universities which are more closed-mind than companies, and vice-versa. It depends very much on the environment, but you have more chances to find an open-mind and freedom in academia. However, as others already pointed out, acedemia is ALL about peer-review and you will find people that will complain even about words, ...


0

You can simply write that you want to pursue your career in research. PhD are made mainly for research. Keep in mind that in Europe it is not possible at all to be enrolled in PhD if you didn't finish your master's degree before (3years bachelor + 2years master + 3/4years PhD in Europe).


1

For any application, for school or a job, the key thing is to make sure that everything in your application indicates a successful future. In Germany, where a masters is mostly "expected" it might be hard to convince an advisor that you are ready unless you have done some exceptional things otherwise. Having the master's gives the PI a better chance to ...


4

There are of course many facets to both your question and any answer anyone could come up with. But yes, in general it is true that academia is not product-driven but curiosity-driven, and so you have more leeway in the directions you choose. It is also true that academia is a place where by and large hard work and creativity is rewarded. I do think it's ...


3

I assume that you have a Master's degree but not a Master's Thesis. The answer to your question depends on the location. In the UK and the US, a Master's degree is not a requirement to start PhD studies, and therefore a Master's Thesis is also not a requirement. The admissions committee will compare your achievements with those of other students who only ...


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