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Please put your comment: My advisor said he 'doesn't really care, just that it needs to be done' - So I am free to do what I want there in the question. Note: you could not be more wrong about being free. Based on your advisor's answer, this means that however you will do the thesis, your advisor will consider it done only if it respects the only way he ...


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I am going to answer this question from the perspective that you are looking to start a traditional academic career as a physicist, given the background in your answer, and try to give some perspective and practical advice. However, I want to emphasize that what I am not telling you is how to evaluate whether following this path is really the best thing for ...


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Professional physicists who study quantum foundations are a tiny portion of professional physicists. I've met a lot of physicists, and I have yet to meet one who studies foundations, though I have read their papers. I'd suggest that the chances of getting such a job are very low, but might be increased if you would like a job that involves teaching. The ...


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If you are the sole author and you still hold copyright (likely since it isn't published), then you can send it. It is your work and you own all rights. However, whether it is wise to send it or not is another question. I suggest that you talk this over with your advisor so see what the downstream consequences might be, especially if you intent to extend ...


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If the status is 'finished but not published/defended/graded/...' then send it with the notion that is hasn't been published yet but is finished as a whole. If you're still writing the thesis or waiting for feedback of your supervisor, then send it with with a note that mentions this fact and the expected finalization date, and possibly check with your ...


3

Send it along If they asked for it send it along. They aren't publishing it (right). While your thesis will be "published" by the university, what that means is they will make 1 copy and stick it in the basement of the library where no one will read it after you defend.


1

I'd get out of the mindset of describing the attributes that some solution for some problem should have, and identify a problem you might find fun to attempt to solve. Once you have the problem to be solved, you can engineer the solution to meet the requirements. Problems exist everywhere, if you only look for them. Find something that's your "itch&...


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Yes, it is a positive, but it is impossible to say how much since admissions committees have their own standards and are made up of individuals. But, if you do well in the research and are able to get a good letter of recommendation from the PI then it will certainly indicate that you are serious about learning "stuff" and practicing the art. While ...


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I would not try to go for a masters right away. You have two options. The "safe" but time-consuming route, that presumably you don't want to do, is to get another bachelor's degree in CS. I bet you don't need a masters to get a good job, but it will be much easier for you to get into a masters program, and you will do better, if you have the right ...


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There are several most common sources of support that a department can give to their grad students: Fellowships. Block grant money. GSR (graduate student research support). TA-ships. Realistically speaking, the best that a student in your situation can hope for is a TA-ship. While the department is not going promise you a TA-ship now, come Fall, it is ...


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If you apply for a PhD and are offered a full-fee masters, this means the department has already decided it does not want to provide financial support. In the USA, departments that offer STEM PhDs only offer full-fee masters degrees for the purpose of collecting tuition money from people who cannot get in to their PhD programs. Unfortunately, it is very ...


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It's almost certainly not possible. The grad school sent you to the department because funding isn't the grad school's job. They don't really know if the department has funds or not. The department's initial response was negative probably because they don't have funds for you. I can only guess at why they've agreed to take a call anyways, but it's probably ...


3

A frame challenge: Are you sure bypassing the masters is really the right thing to do? Depending on your underlying motivations, there may be more effective ways to achieve them. On the one hand, the main good motivation I’ve heard for going directly to a PhD is to finish it sooner. But instead of skipping the masters, you can also achieve this by ...


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Concerning the question if the Diplom is equivalent to M.Sc.: it mostly is, but in some instances, a Diplom is actually considered inferior to a Masters. Why? Follwing the Bachelor - Master route compared to the diploma means you have actually completed two separate courses of studies and have written two theses. Master graduates are thus considered (...


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My ten cents: In France, if your bachelor was 5 years long (some Latin-American countries have 5 year long bachelors) your advisor can fill a document asking the university to waive the Master on the basis that you already have 5 years of schooling, which can be considered equivalent to the French bach(3+2) system.


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I'm an american who did this as part of a special program at a university following the Bologna accord (which is the standard throughout continental Europe for some time now). On my records with the university they would write I was in the PhD (bridge) program to explain why I was taking 2 years of masters classes.


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If you want to work in industry: A HR person is mostly tasked with sorting out applicants. They assign them to job candidacies and within the candidacies they assign them for follow up or no follow up. The assignment to candidacies is already so streamlined to save the HR person's time that basically the candidate must tell the HR person exactly what job ...


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I'd say, having two masters degrees could definitely help you if you consider the 2nd one as a back-up plan (in terms of research fields/directions) if you cannot find a good PhD position in the field relevant for your 1st (main) one. It should, of course, depend on the availability, so ideally, there should be higher competition in the field of the "...


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You provided a long list of universities and I bothered to check two of them, which took me about 5 minutes each at most. The ETH Zürich, as a Swiss federal institute of technology, is governed by Swiss regulations. Specifically, for the doctorate it's SR 414.133.1, available in German and other languages that you can look up for yourself. In SR 414.133.1, ...


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Pursuing a dual Master degree to distinguish yourself is likely to be detrimental. You are doing good in learning the analytical foundations (i.e. the TUM master) then you want to apply these foundations somewhere (i.e. not the LMU master). Have a look at https://www.s-a.uni-muenchen.de/praktikum/index.html and then propose yourself for an internship at ...


4

This doesn't address the question you ask, but is more long term advice from someone looking back, rather than forward. For a good answer to your actual question, see that of Ethan Bolker here. You may find in coming years that you wish to return to academia and continue doctoral studies. It might be after your children are grown, but it might be sooner. If ...


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Whether you can do this without marring the professional connection with your advisor depends more on who she is than on how you go about telling her (yes, the conversation is necessary). Do thank her for helping you learn all you have. Your commitment to wrapping up your current project is important. If she's the kind of advisor she should be, she will wish ...


4

University of Warsaw has a list of PhD programs for international students, and having a master degree is one of the requirements to apply. This list is not exhaustive though, so if you're interested, please contact the responsible person and ask directly (there is an english webpage).


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In Germany, it might be possible to start a PhD with only a bachelor's degree. Not all universities allow that, though (you will have to check their websites). To get accepted with only a bachelor's degree, you normally have to have very good grades, and it might be that you have to take additional courses. Be aware though, that this is (still) quite ...


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In contrast to Stephen McMahon's answer, which holds absolutely true for the UK, the situation in most of continental Europe is the opposite. On the continent, it would be very unusual to start a PhD directly after one's BSc, hence the suggestion to look for "precedent or a way for the Master's requirement to be bypassed" at your Unis of interest. ...


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At least in the UK, a Master's is not a typical requirement for PhD entry, with the minimum level usually being a good undergraduate degree. E.g. pulling a random CS PhD project from the University of Edinburgh website, it says under candidate profile: A good Bachelors degree (2.1 or above or international equivalent) and/or Masters degree in a relevant ...


0

While this is by no means a complete answer, here is one thing that you have to think about: What happens if you are not able to finish your studies or get a job after your graduation? And how likely is this possibility? Any loan that you take would likely be easily paid back if you get a job in Sweden/western Europe (I think this based on experience from ...


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My field (economics) in the US generally works the way you're describing - you can quit in the middle of your PhD and leave with your masters. At my program, once we completed some number of graduate credits (I think it was around 2.5 years worth) we simply filled out an application on the student management portal for a masters, and they awarded it. It ...


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This varies, but in my experience (US/Canada, biology/math/statistics), entering an "M.S." program assumes that you will want to complete the Master's degree and leave (for industry or a PhD program elsewhere). in an "M.S./Ph.D." program you are initially enrolled for a Master's; if, toward the end of the Master's program, it looks like ...


2

There is no way for us to know which (if any) of the following two things is true: your supervisor stole your ideas, wrote a paper about them with one of their colleagues, and is now feeding it back to you; your supervisor and a colleague of theirs had been submitting a paper of theirs two years ago, it has been going through a tortuous and so far ...


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I have contacted already a third person about this (edit: an ombuds-person, who is also a professor at my faculty) This ombudsperson is probably the person best suited to give advice about whether misconduct occurred and what your options may be. Given that you are already talking to an ombudsperson, I would not want to add my own speculation into the mix. ...


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