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6

No. I have no idea what is going on. The Chinese government blocks Google but does not forbid its citizens from using Google abroad, for example. There is no law forbidding the use of Google or Overleaf, and the government could not care less. I'm not sure what they are up to or if there is a misunderstanding.


2

I guess it depends on whether the person knows about how you (and others) feel about their behavior or not. Case A) You are not sure. When it can't harm you in the future I don't see a reason why you should not provide feedback. As you said in one of your comments yourself: it could help others who have to work with this person. Case B) The person is ...


7

From your description ("final deadline") it sounds as though there is no way to fix the situation with the paper. Moreover, you say have decided not to work with this person again (which seems reasonable). So there is most likely no benefit to be had from expressing your disappointment directly. Frustrating as it may be, cutting your losses and moving on ...


4

Buffy's answer already makes a key point: discuss the potentially thorny issues at the start, not at the end when you feel the sting. I'd like to add to that: put some work into getting to know this person. Rather than agree to a collaboration right away, gather some information first; Look up this person's previous publications. What's the quality like? ...


6

It is good to be wary if you don't have much experience with the person and their basic ethical patterns. On the other hand, collaboration is a good thing generally if people contribute on an equitable (not necessarily equal) basis. It depends on how much risk you are willing to take here and how important this particular project is to you. Once you agree, ...


1

I think "being on the ground" makes it really easy to find the right collaborator! Find whoever runs a seminar series in the appropriate department (i.e. you're in math, look for an appropriate math seminar) that you'll want to visit and would be interested in giving a seminar talk. Most people will enjoy the ease in planning something that plans itself. ...


3

It sounds quite strange to sign collaboration agreements without any feeling of what is going on on the other site. Get the text of the agreements. Presumably some discussions on potential collaboration areas were part of the negotiations, contacting the people signing the agreement (and/or the people involved in negotiations) would be the first step. First ...


5

There are likely not all that many departments at the other university where possible collaborators could be located. Assuming they are in a part of the world where departments and people have websites, go to the website of the possible departments, and then the websites of faculty in that department. This way, you are not limited by the vagaries of having ...


6

Web of Science can do this to some extent. Go to Web of Science and search the keyword in "topic". After getting results, refine by funding agencies and look for the institution you want. I'm not sure how comprehensive this is, though.


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