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3

If I understand what you have written, you can just drop them. A reading group, hoping to produce a paper in the future, doesn't yet have significant intellectual contributions to that paper to say who should be the authors of what. Once someone has earned authorship of a paper, they can't be "dropped", though some would call that a controversial ...


14

This is a variation on @Buffy's answer. I would ask the collaborator if it would be helpful for you to provide a draft of the missing sections that they could then edit as much as they want. You could also list out the bullet points that you think should be in the missing sections so that they can respond before you write that draft. This is what I almost ...


34

So, just do it. Write the missing parts as best you can. Keep the other as co-author and ask permission to publish. You have an issue that may not be resolvable otherwise. The co-author may not have any options about this. Keep them informed, but push forward. If they come back in, then do what you need to do to merge the work. Preferably ask advice (say, in ...


1

Constructive criticism is the best way to go in these cases, unless you are the primary owner of the paper, it's gonna be hard to bulldoze your opinions. Give comments and suggestions on things that aren't addressed or sections where it isn't clear. For the most part, these papers go through a lot of changes so it's normal to rewrite the whole paper ...


0

I've met two entirely different types of talks at group meetings: Talks where the speaker presents their work: besides providing an overview to everyone what is going on where in the group, here the audience may provide guidance to the speaker, but they usually don't learn that much for themselves. In te context of thesis research (which has an element of ...


0

I once tried to bring such group meetings in an academic group I was affiliated to and unfortunately I failed to. I should mention that at that time I had very little experience in research and in industry. The people attending the group were first or second year PhD students or masters students. Each of the students had their own issues and concerns which ...


1

I applaud you for desiring an increased level of engagement and 'realness' in your meetings. In addition to meeting more frequently, I recommend structuring part of your meetings from a formative feedback perspective in which all participants are provided a natural avenue to voice their struggles/concerns in a way that fosters growth instead of judgement. As ...


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