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Should I report two minor mistakes found in an academic paper to the journal editor or authors of the paper?

Should I report two minor mistakes found in an academic paper to the journal editor or authors of the paper? The politeness requires that the authors are contacted in any case. Whether the editor ...
Roger V.'s user avatar
  • 1,278
1 vote

Coauthors rewrote and published "abandoned" project without my knowledge

You should have been acknowledged. it happens that you may think what you contributed was crucial, but the authors think differently. In this case it can be a problem, or an opportunity. Reaching out ...
Markus Petz's user avatar
10 votes

How can I work with a senior researcher who is less knowledgeable than myself?

You should have a conversation with this senior researcher about what you each hope to gain from these meetings. I cannot say for certain but it is definitely possible that you currently have very ...
Steven Gubkin's user avatar
10 votes

How can I work with a senior researcher who is less knowledgeable than myself?

Well, one thing you should learn is to explain and to write things in such a way that understanding them (versus inventing/discovering them) would be possible 2 or 3 levels below yours (ideally any ...
fedja's user avatar
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48 votes
Accepted

How can I work with a senior researcher who is less knowledgeable than myself?

"whereas the senior researcher in question, for whatever reason, relies solely on our meetings to learn about the background research" Being a young researcher you are likely much sharper in ...
R1NaNo's user avatar
  • 6,312
7 votes

How can I work with a senior researcher who is less knowledgeable than myself?

Usually, a collaboration arises when both (or several) collaborators have something nontrivial to contribute to a project. It appears that you are asking about a situation when this is not the case. ...
Moishe Kohan's user avatar
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2 votes

Coauthors rewrote and published "abandoned" project without my knowledge

It's hard to account for academic norms. Your expectations don't seem to have been met, they're not unreasonable, but there is more grey in the scenario than is perhaps obvious. Some in this thread ...
DAM's user avatar
  • 31
-1 votes

Coauthors rewrote and published "abandoned" project without my knowledge

Ideas are cheap, seeing them through is what counts. Lesson to learn? Next time you initiate/agree to a preliminary collaboration that you think has value, then see it through to a conclusion or let ...
R1NaNo's user avatar
  • 6,312
6 votes

Coauthors rewrote and published "abandoned" project without my knowledge

Whether you should have been invited to be a co-author, acknowledged, or whether they were perfectly in the right to move on to do a related but independent follow-up project on their own really ...
xLeitix's user avatar
  • 135k
-4 votes

Coauthors rewrote and published "abandoned" project without my knowledge

It, unfortunately, happens all the time. Definitely reach out and defend your work as best you can by sticking up for yourself. But if it doesn't mean a publication later on, then just see it as a ...
hack 91372's user avatar
2 votes

Censorship by Collaboration?

Short answer: Write your own article representing your own ideas, trying to abstract away what you feel was contributed only by your former co-authors, and acknowledge what is left of their ...
J..y B..y's user avatar
  • 2,314
5 votes

Censorship by Collaboration?

For various reasons, sometimes some co-authors want to remove their names from a publication. Ideally, their intellectual contributions should also be removed (especially if they "want to stop ...
David White's user avatar
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