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Personally, I would advise against submitting these two papers simultaneously, precisely because you still seem to be (relatively) inexperienced in terms of getting papers published. You could quickly get into a number of tricky situations, for example: (1) You submit both papers at the same time for different journals, but then you receive from both ...


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Legal aspects depend on jurisdiction, but in general the following are points to have in mind: in most countries, computer programs are literary works that are protected by copyright. In that respect, it does not matter whether your code has any scientific contribution, the moment you create it you have author's rights. there's no such thing as "owning ...


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I'll leave aside the legal side of this, other than to say that I agree with other that the likely legal status is that the university owns the code that is not in the public domain. Moving to the moral side of things. It is correct that if you developed a code base that is useful academically, you should be credited for this. But from your description in ...


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The answer is "it depends," but I'll throw out some US-oriented answers that apply to me as I know it at UT Austin under US NSF funding now. The usual thing to have done would to have published the original code along with the paper and/or your Master's thesis (depending on how long ago that was) under an NSF-approved open source license, assuming ...


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The fact that you created the repository is visible under your account's activity, so anyone following your account can see it in their feed. This can also be seen later by viewing your activity by subscribing to your RSS Feed. However, generally this should be a concern for anonymizing for peer review, since the requirements are usually much lower — authors ...


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