154

My educated guess is that the reviewer is a native speaker of German and mistranslated some terms into English: The German word Übung translates both to practice and to exercise. In German universities, höhere Mathematik (literally: higher mathematics) was used as a label for mathematics courses for students of other scientific fields or engineering. At ...


126

Could I get some suggestion on how do I manage in such time? Is it normal for a early-age academia? No, this is common for academics of any age. Anonymous evaluations are notoriously a valve for students to express their dissatisfaction without having to be reflective, fair, or even truthful about it. If you ask for anonymous feedback, you will need to be ...


116

I think that your plan is based on number of possibly wrong premises. And even if they were mostly right, I doubt such a plan could have any reasonable success. Let's see my reasons. I just had a lecture from someone who has been a senior scientist (and has completed a PhD, post-doc) at a hospital for already 15 years.So I'm assuming this person is ...


82

What should I do? Honestly? I suggest that you sympathize courteously, but do nothing else: She's a grown woman and an experienced academic, she doesn't need you to handle frustrations from student feedback. You (likely) no longer work at the same university as her. You're not a close personal friend of hers. You don't have a good idea of what actually ...


80

I would not intervene unless I felt the student was at risk of harming themselves or others. As you say, college is about more than grades, learning how to handle failure is part of life. Moreover it’s not unlikely that their performance on the final was the icing on the cake: they had a bad day/week and were upset about all of it plus the final. Unless ...


67

I have a different view on such feedback and here is how I deal with it. First of all, the anonymous comments are a great feedback and they are generally true. Second, students, especially younger ones, are pretty bad at wording their thoughts on paper. They tend to exaggerate, be offensive or aggressive, focus on seemingly irrelevant things, draw wrong ...


62

I would suggest approaching your colleague in a humble and inquisitive way (especially since you're a junior member of the team). If you start the conversation with "your conclusions are wrong and here's why" you're going to set a combative tone for the rest of the meeting. There may be reasons that they interpreted the data the way they did that you're not ...


60

Some comments about the situation first (even though you have not explicitly asked about this): Let me rephrase what you wrote slightly: if the teacher gives the students all relevant infos beforehand they see no need to come to the lecture anymore; the only way to get students to come to the lecture is by explicitly holding back information, and then the ...


58

I would ask for a meeting, but not for the reason you suggest. You may be misinterpreting messages. I'd ask him if he was pleased or not with your work and what you can do to improve it in his opinion. If it seems like a good idea when you are having such a conversation mention that you think he is displeased and don't understand why. Don't overthink that ...


54

You said, this sudden unfair comparison has gone on my nerve It sounds like this negative feedback has provoked some strong emotion in you, and understandably so. But asking for an explanation is not likely to be helpful at this point. This isn't a constructive comment that can potentially lead you to improve your teaching - it's just an insult. ...


53

In the examples you gave, one stood out as maybe actually useful; I hope to use it as an example for my suggested approach: You do not teach what is in the book. Plus, you ask very difficult questions in the test. What do you want to prove? This isn't the most well-constructed feedback, and certainly isn't polite, but I think there is a useful criticism ...


53

This might be productive in a direct conversation, if you are able to establish rapport, and if you can steer the conversation in a productive direction. You could start by asking her to clarify some key point you were interested in. Stop her as soon as there's something you don't understand, and if necessary ask her to spell the word you don't understand. ...


53

The real answer is that they don't. I'm sorry, but I can't slice it any other way. You would need all the planets to align in order to receive an answer after such an email. You are asking someone who doesn't know you and who is probably very busy (like all academics) to provide you a big favor for nothing in return. Because let's be honest, giving feedback ...


49

Essentially, you have three challenges that work against you receiving an answer to this mail: You need to avoid your mail to appear like academic spam. Your email draft is rather good in that sense because it is short, nicely written, and free of the usual keywords that trigger people's mental spam filter ("submit your article", "endorse this and that", ...


47

Don't send the email. Based on my experience, I predict that the anonymous email you are proposing to send almost certainly won't tell the speaker any information she does not already know, only something that she is either in denial about or that she is (for whatever mysterious reasons of human psychology) helpless or unwilling to do anything about. On the ...


46

I feel there are two different layers to that - whether, and to what extent, teaching evaluations are actually anonymous, and if they aren't, whether it's still "safe" to give a bad one. Are evaluations anonymous? On a superficial level, all universities that I have taught at had entirely anonymous evaluations. At no point in the process was I ever told ...


44

The difference between descriptive writing and critical writing is much like the difference between a newspaper report and an opinion column. Descriptive writing is the act of reporting on what's in the literature: Smith found that when X occurred Y and Z also happened. Critical writing analyzes what has been done, and takes note of trends, as well as ...


40

General feedback rules apply. Here are some of them: There is no need to criticize any person. Stick to facts. Describe things, especially describe what you think about things, e.g. don't write "the assertion is not justified by the data" but "I can't see how this is explained by the data" (and probably give an example of some claim which you find equally "...


40

Yes, you should raise this with the department, either with the Undergraduate Director or the Chair. The problem is not Prof. Johnson's unfamiliarity with the LMS--as a new faculty member, that is understandable. But you should restate what you said here about not teaching the assigned material. You mention online quizzes that were given to him. Are they ...


40

This doesn't answer your question, but I think your real problem isn't your writing, but the way how you and your advisor communicate. What I suggest is that you have a sit-down with your advisor and raise the issue with them. Tell them what you told us - that their barrage of negative feedback is hampering your motivation and productivity, and that you ...


36

It may well be that the student was upset due to frustration with their own performance and had nothing to do with you or with being cut off. Their actions may not reflect unprofessional behavior as much as just immaturity. Frustration often boils over into anger and the anger is often misplaced. You may have experienced this yourself, actually. I don't ...


35

He was a one year contract with the university, and was hired a mere two weeks prior to the semester beginning. This situation suggests that the university was unable to hire anyone better prepared to teach. They probably know that already. I doubt speaking to the department chair will make a difference.


34

Here is one strategy: Specify the level of changes the student needs to make before they can come back again. Request that the student shows you what changes have been made by comparing the old and new versions of the assignment. If student has failed to reach the level suggested or fails to show you the differences, simply tell them to go away until ...


33

They laughed at your "please don't kill me" because that's something you would say as a joke/icebreaker. It would be more impolite not to laugh... To me it sounds like you are struggling with English and Western culture. This seems to be a misunderstanding, you just gave an anxious retelling of a conversation that would happen among a group enjoying each ...


31

Seems to me that there's a missing word, and the correct comment might be something more like: The considered problem in this manuscript is a practice in high school mathematics and can not be a paper for publication in high-level journals. In other words, your manuscript is too simple to be published in an academic journal.


30

Basically, I agree that what xLeitix said is the gist of if: as long as you are respectful, you should be fine. To elaborate a little, my only experience with giving feedback back to the professor is a bit specific: a fairly young professor, that just got the course for the first time and was trying to improve it. Like in your case, he also said that he ...


29

While there are some good answers here, I will just add a few thoughts from my own experiences. I also have plenty of students who try for minimal work just to get a pass. I used to explain to them what their grade would be and why but in the end, all they heard was what their grade would be. If it was pass they stopped listening. Of course, this is quite ...


27

There is no straightforward answer to this, since it varies enormously by institution. Anonymous feedback can still be unmasked As others have said already, an ostensibly anonymous survey may not end up being so anonymous in practice; it is pretty easy to guess someone's identity, especially if the class is small or if you have interacted with the lecturer ...


26

It would be nice if statistics was always about the truth, and there was a right answer or method to every question. That simply isn't the case though, and many elements have room for debate. I'm an economist, and I've seen this first-hand in three different areas. First, I did some interdisciplinary empirical research where I worked with a sociologist ...


25

Set the Stage At the start of each relationship, let each student know that you value feedback, that you are adaptable/flexible in your approach to supervision, and that you will be asking for their feedback both during and at the end of the end of the supervision period. Reinforce the Message and Values During the supervision period, look for ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible