150

As noted in the comments, actions committed long ago as a child are (and should be) entirely irrelevant to graduate admissions. It is well understood that children do not have same ability as adults to comprehend the consequences on their actions. As a result, many legal systems wipe a child's record clean of most or all juvenile offenses upon reaching ...


122

No. How will you know exactly what's "just enough to pass the first selection round"? You won't. You can't. Don't "surprise" by withholding helpful information. I believe most people find it annoying and inconsiderate when someone deliberately withholds information that they need in order to do their job (which is what you are proposing to do to the ...


113

First of all, you should cool down before you take any action. Clearly, the interview was an emotionally intense event for you, so don't do anything in the spur of the moment (and "a few days later" may still qualify as "in the spur of the moment" in this context). Let a few more days pass, and see how you feel later. Second, seek the guidance of a trusted ...


104

The solution here is honesty and candor. You should explain that you would like to visit the campus, but that your financial situation doesn't allow it at the moment. Any reasonable person would either drop the suggestion of a campus visit, or find some money to pay for your travel expenses. Any other reaction would be a red flag.


96

I would find this odd and unprofessional. I recommend against this. Also, I want to be able to talk freely and openly with you in an interview, and have you respond in kind, and I would be worried about how having your girlfriend on the line will affect this dynamic. (For example: I might worry that you would be distracted by thinking about how she is ...


94

Be happy for the opportunity to meet with the PI who's invited you for an interview, and go to the interview with an open mind and attitude. Answer questions you receive honestly and without artifice. Show rather than tell your enthusiasm for what's going on. What's important is what you can do in the lab, and how you go about doing it. You might have a ...


84

There are a few possibilities. It may be that an interview is required by the policy of the institution. It is also likely that they want to get an idea of how you would fit in personally. If they are happy with your application materials and have no reason to doubt your honesty in that, they just might want to know if your personality seems compatible. ...


83

If you make it completely clear at the time of asking that you would cover all additional expenses, then staying for a day or two extra would be regarded as perfectly normal and reasonable. (Academics travelling to conferences and workshops do this sort of thing all the time.) Indeed, it may even be regarded as a positive sign: if you do join their PhD ...


73

They seem to have all the facts already. Just tell them that you had already made travel arrangements to visit A and B on the dates that C wanted you to come out, and that you have to regretfully decline to come to C. They're not going to be mad at you.


73

There are two things worth keeping in mind. First, while it might be the case that the committee is "forced" to interview a female candidate, it might not. You have no actual evidence in either case, and though it's tempting to assume the worst, there's no reason to, and there's absolutely nothing to gain by thinking the search committee doesn't want you ...


70

Assuming they liked your presentation, and consider putting you on the shortlist, but are not sure at which position compared to some other candidate; now, reflect, which impression this makes. You made a nontrivial mistake which is also quite costly. You ask them to cover that mistake of yours. Even if they would be willing to do so (and assume it would ...


68

Don't go -- it's a waste of everyone's time if you go to an interview without any intention of taking the job. People get (rightfully) more upset about you wasting their time than you not wanting a job because you've already found one elsewhere. Besides, if you will be required to collaborate with the person with whom you were to have your second interview, ...


63

Not at all. You should go to the interview, see the competing offer, if you get it, and then decide. Note that you will likely not have time to have either school make a counter offer. Therefore, I would recommend that at the interview you let the school know you have an existing offer and deadline and that they will have to move quickly and at least match ...


63

When someone asks in an interview, no-matter what the topic, which cutting edge approaches interest you, they are subtly asking three entirely different questions (in order of severity): Are you even exposed to any of them (which shows an interest in your subject in general) If yes, do you have an opinion on any of them (which shows leadership, independent ...


62

It's not a bad sign at all. If they have more interviews arranged, they wouldn't be doing their job if they didn't interview them. They don't just hire the first person suitable for the job. They hire the best person for the job! This may still be you - or it may be the next person to be interviewed. Be patient, and they should let you know one way or the ...


61

Just to put what's already in the comments into an answer: Yes, you should convey the information you've told us to the hiring faculty. If you've gotten a campus interview for a faculty position, they are already extremely interested and satisfied with your on-paper qualifications. Final decisions are often strongly motivated by who they think will take ...


58

Once you've accepted a job offer, you are supposed to inform other places that you've applied that you would like to withdraw from consideration. If they still want to invite you over to give a talk knowing that you can not be considered for the position, go ahead. But, you must tell them. To do otherwise would be a serious breach of ethics. You do not ...


58

I have seen Math.SE and MathOverflow activities mentioned by both grad students and faculty in connection with various applications and promotion-related materials. I don't see this as anything to scoff at; personally I find it intriguing and consider looking up someone's SE profile(s) a great way to get some insight into their mathematical personality (note ...


56

A political or ideological answer, albeit honest, is usually a missed opportunity to make a point about the move being a good academic fit. Your goal as the candidate in this kind of exchange is not just to answer the questions accurately; it's to answer the questions accurately while also trying to convince the committee that you are the right person for ...


55

Time is one of the most valuable resources for professors – I know no one who just offers interviews for fun.


52

While its not mandatory to wear a suit for a faculty interview, it doesn't hurt, and may actually be expected in certain disciplines. Best to ask around beforehand. I've never heard of a dress code for student visit, but something semi-formal doesn't hurt. As a general principle, it doesn't hurt to be more dressed up than necessary. The reverse can often ...


51

There isn’t anything to interpret. The only conclusion you can draw is that there was another candidate whom the professor thought would be a better fit for the position, for an unspecified reason. Our minds have a psychological tendency to want to fill in a lack of information with speculation and beliefs. The added information you have in this case is ...


44

I think this is highly field dependent, but in general overdressed is better than underdressed. In fields close to mine (math, computer science) things are quite relaxed, so no one would expect a (skirt) suit (although this would be ok) and nice trousers (usually including jeans) and shirt are most probably ok. Ragged jeans and t-shirt may not always work, ...


41

No, you shouldn't. Not yet, anyway         In general, I think it's perfectly fine to list that information on a CV for an academic position. Depending on the profile of the position itself, I would feature it more or less prominently. Say, if you apply for a scientific programming position (or a position with heavy coding), you could list it under a “...


41

The accepted answer is absolutely correct, but I'd like to make a point that I don't see anywhere else. Do you personally think that the incident in question has any bearing on your current academic fitness? I'm going to venture a guess that your answer is a solid "No". Looking at it another way, were the situation reversed, would you care if an applicant ...


41

I can't comment on how common this is outside of biomedical sciences (my field), but it's becoming quite common in this field. In terms of what it is, the "Chalk Talk" is a chance for you to talk about your research (past, current, and future directions) without hiding behind Powerpoint slides. You'll typically be given up to an hour to do this, in front ...


40

I have seen them in all in faculty job talks in our department for the last few years. I have seen messenger bags, backpacks and briefcases; some of them have been made of expensive leather and looked really classy/professional and I have even seen them made of cheap, fraying materials. Either way, it does not matter - except maybe in incredibly ...


40

Would the potentially high cost of flying me to an interview lead to some institutions passing me over? I believe many universities, especially smaller universities, will balk at flying overseas candidates in for interviews. Often they will move down their short lists and only if they are unable to find a suitable candidate that is higher than you on the ...


39

In general, don't attribute inaction to malice or fraud when it almost certainly is just due to laziness, disorganization, or incompetence. University bureaucracies, especially in some countries, can be unbelievably slow. Sadly, three weeks is often not a particularly long period to go unreimbursed. Be patient and persistent and this will almost certainly ...


39

As a committee member/voting faculty member (at R1 place) on relevant things, etc., I'd say that mention of "high reputation" would seem childish, but as "outreach", activity on such sites is a plus. It is "outreach", which is good, if not super-glam. In the future, it may be more than "outreach" (which is not exactly the right descriptor, anyway), but for ...


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