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72

I would go with: P.W.D. Charles, Project Title, (2013), GitHub repository, https://github.com/charlespwd/project-title Or a bit different, depending on your citation style. Just is is crucial to include: author, title (if style includes it), year and link. Of course if you do have a publication related to this piece of code (even if only by fact it is ...


33

For cases like this, unless you want to give a historical reference, there's usually no need to cite the primary source, you can just cite your favourite circuit theory book. Anyway, if you really wish, you can certainly cite the original paper too, which can be found, e.g., here. For what concerns the added question on where to draw the line, you can have ...


22

I am writing an article for an audience that mostly consists of computer scientists. A specific part of the subject is motivated by Kirchhoff's laws. I intend to mention this fact and reference the rules. But that is easier said then done. Apparently, Kirchhoff predates referencing. Your statements make no sense. It's like saying that you want to use ...


19

An erratum would usually only include the part to be corrected from the original publication. Hence it would be insufficient to cite just the erratum and not the original article. Examples of such errata are shown in the US NLM site. Thus you must cite both original article as well as the errtum. But there is a method to cite errata. You should cite the ...


17

Now they become somehow citable by providing DOI references. That was on their 14th of May news: https://github.com/blog/1840-improving-github-for-science


14

I use Zotero which in itself is a system for handling references, it comes as both a plugin to Firefox and as standalone. I use the standalone version to extract reference information from pdf and then export to, in my case, BibTeX .bib format. There are possibilities to export to other formats as well.


14

Several .bib files in the a single folder: You might want to do this if you write about quite disjoint topics, or if you want to keep several sets of inherently different references in separate files (e.g. scientific publications in one file, technical standard documents in another, etc.). Overall, however, I see little reason to choose this approach. One ....


14

The citation key in bibtex can be anything you want. What you call JagadeeshChandraBose2010, I can call 1234567 or abcdefg, as long as I call it the same thing in the tex file as in the bib file. Since that key can be any string you want, there is obviously no way to map between that arbitrary string and the article. Now, if the string follows a particular ...


12

The underlying question seems to be how to get citable software. There is a traditional method for doing this. You write a methodology paper describing the software, how it was built, what it does. You can provide the source code as supplementary information. And then you cite that paper, in future papers where you apply the software.


11

This doesn't answer your entire question, but may be useful (for example, you might have got the papers from a list of DOIs in the first place). Assuming these are PDFs with CrossRef DOIs, if you can extract the DOI from the PDF, you can get citation directly from CrossRef's API. For the DOI 10.5555/12345678, the query: http://api.crossref.org/works/10....


11

As of August 31, 2016, this functionality has been added! See this blog post: https://googlescholar.blogspot.com/2016/08/organizing-your-scholar-library.html


11

Firstly, BibTeX is more or less a data structure. You can populate its fields however you want, as long as it captures the essential information. Now, there is an @patent{...} type which, while not standard, is supported by many styles. Check the documentation for the citation style you are using for details. As you would be using either the @misc or @...


10

I'd send the .tex and .bib file, which seems by far the most logical thing to do, to both you and me at least. On explicit request I'll grudgingly provide the .bbl file. This should make things easier for them, as you correctly suggest. It is easy and fast to convert a .bib to a .bbl, but the other way round is impossible. If the journal has a workflow ...


9

In contrast to the freemium/proprietary tool suggested in the answer by andreas, I propose a FOSS solution that works reliably for this specific task. Assuming you are connected to a network that provides permissions to legally download the required content, the cross-platform reference manager,JabRef has integrated fetchers to download full-texts for the ...


9

Probably, the only general rule to follow is that the key should be something that well characterizes the document. Anything more specific will depend a lot on the topics you are writing about, and vary from reference to reference: Is the title very unique, or rather generic? In the former case, a shortened version of the title could be integrated into the ...


9

For mathematical articles I'm not aware of any citation database of (nearly) as good quality as MatSciNet --- your university is probably also paying a significant subscription fee for it. As Paul Garrett already mentioned, you can probably access it from home via your university's library. There is actually an even simpler method (at least with a laptop): ...


9

Bibtex citation keys are in no-way unique, nor do they have to be meaningful. The sole purpose of the key is to use it as a reference link when citing the work. In latex you would do something like \cite{foobar} where foobar is a perfectly valid key. To add to the confusion, there is no unique convention on naming bibtex entries, and whether there should be ...


8

GitHub now offers citation as a service, at least with Zenodo. This guide instructs how to connect your accounts and get a DOI with your work: https://guides.github.com/activities/citable-code/


8

I can only add that you can download citations one by one: in Settings > Bibliography Manager, check Show link to import citation into BibTex. With that, you can probably write a script (maybe using Scholar.py) that downloads all your citations. An example URL is: http://scholar.google.com/scholar.bib?scila=u_35RYKgDlwC&output=citation&hl=en&...


8

@Ébe's advice is probably best for the [1] [2] scientific style of references. In many humanities disciplines using footnotes, however, it's simplest and most common to append the errata information to the end of the publication unless you want to discuss the errata individually. So something like: Michael Cuthbert, "Common tones in simple time," Journal ...


7

Here is one nearly automatic way to do it using Zotero (https://www.zotero.org/): 1) import the PDFs in Zotero. One way is to select multiple PDFs and drag them into a collection (in the LHS pane) of Zotero. 2) Select the PDF items (CTRL click in Windows for multiple selections), right click and select "Retrieve metadata from PDF". Note that this step ...


7

The "academically correct" solution is usually to format that bibliographical item as any other item, with the name which appears on the paper (this is also remarked in the answers to the linked question). Then, you can add a bibliographical note saying that the name is a pseudonym: in bibtex you can do this by means of the field note. However, about this, ...


7

Looks right to me. That's how they ask to be cited, and it seems reasonable. Indeed, this discussion also agrees that citing the user manual is the right choice.


6

You are not providing page numbers with citations for their own sake, but to help readers to locate the cited passage, e.g., if they want to verify it or see it in context. (Therefore page numbers are already diminished in their usefulness for regular books as soon as there are two editions with significantly different paging.) The arguably easiest way to ...


6

Strangely enough, this question was asked on SO a while back with no real good answers. There was a link to this question, which links to PaperScope, which looks promising, although there hasn't been activity on the project since April 2013. I've never used it that tool. Microsoft's Visual Explorerisn't exactly what you're looking for, but it's related. ...


5

As far as I know Google does not offer a user interface to do that. Actually they still do not offer an API to interact with your results. However, if you can handle code a little or you know someone who does, I found this. As they say, you: Can extract publication title, main online URL, number of citations, number of online versions, link to Google ...


5

BibTeX is usually a very heterogeneous source of bibliographic references. URLs can be stored in several fields like 'url', 'howpublished', or 'citeulike-linkout-0', 'citeulike-linkout-1'... 'citeulike-linkout-n'. Moreover, some entries have a DOI, arXiv ID, PubMed ID or PMC ID and some don't. As a developer of Paperpile I had the pleasure to dig into this ...


5

cb2Bib is a tool to extract bibtex entries from PDF files. The following will command extract bibtex entries from PDF file using cb2Bib command line c2bconsole --doc2bib paper2.pdf references.bib --sloppy


5

NB: My answer does not differentiate between open and closed sourced projects and I have not used any of the seemingly big list of solutions. This SO answer suggests that the 2010 London Dev8D meeting, whatever that is, ran a contest for meta data extraction and resulted in pdfssa4met. I cannot find any documentation on the meeting and anything else that ...


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