If you need help with online teaching or other challenges in academia arising from the COVID-19 crisis, we have prepared this FAQ to get you started.
100

I'm not sure how far ethics comes into this, but omitting accents is, effectively, a misspelling of the name. If you need to cite something by Schön, and you instead write "Schon", I'd regard that as analogous to writing "Schöm" or "Schöh": pretty close, but certainly a typo. If I'm reviewing a paper, I will request correction of missing accents as I would ...


99

As somebody with accents in the name who does not put them on scientific papers, I would recommend going with the way they put their names on the papers. Certain people are very particular about having the right accents, but others (including myself) consider them a nuisance and avoid them. The only way to know in the particular case is to check the paper ...


42

The only alternative that comes to my mind is Zotero: It is open-source, it comes as a standalone application or as a web-based version with Firefox, Chrome and Safari connectors, it integrates with Word or OpenOffice, it syncs with the Zotero server, it has BibTeX export, and more. The Zotero standalone client is cross-platform and open-source (AGPL ...


37

You do not need to use reference managers. However, if you use some reference managers like Mendeley then, some of the benefits are obvious: The pdf of your article is linked to the reference itself. You can organize references into logical groups (areas, subjects, disciplines, sub-disciplines) by utilizing folders and tags. You can one-click save articles ...


34

This isn't a matter of ethics: it's a matter of respect. It is disrespectful to spell somebody's name incorrectly. It is doubly disrespectful to knowingly spell somebody's name incorrectly because you're too damned lazy to do it right.


28

If you're using Adobe Acrobat Reader (which I suspect you are), you can press alt + left to jump back to where you were before clicking the link. I find it amazingly useful.


17

I accomplish this using the groups feature of Mendeley. It works on all three major OS's, allows you to share bibliographies easily with both your group and external collaborators. It also allows something that I think is very important -- lots of bibliographies on particular topics within the realm of what my group does. See, for example http://www....


17

All bibliographic software has a learning curve. You have to invest time and energy up front to learn the system and set up your database, and only reap the benefits later in the decreased amortized cost of maintaining correct citations. If somebody doesn't think the tradeoff will be worth it (e.g., thinks they "aren't good with computers" or doesn't ...


16

You could consider hosting it via one of the reference / citation managers, such as CiteULike or Mendeley, which can take imports of Bibtex files. Your own university may (should!) have such a web-front plus publication database available, for you to embed into your university home page. Wordpress If your webpage is hosted directly on wordpress.com, then ...


15

Docear Haven't tried it yet but https://www.docear.org/ seems to stand out as one of the leading open-source alternative to mendeley. Docear is basically a marriage of JabRef and Freeplane. It uses JabRef as a backend for its reference management and Freeplane to organize references, annotations you make in the pdf, and any other information (including ...


15

I fully agree and can give extra input into @BurakUlgut's answer (+1), and @Ponts answer about the names in the paper itself. I want to reinforce the advice that you should use the names as the author's themselves put on the papers. This will prevent confusion in some cases. In the country where I was born my name contains an accent (actually a non-latin1 ...


14

You can also try out Google Scholar Citations, which is a new service for showing the citation count for all your papers. As an example, here's my small list.


14

I use Zotero which in itself is a system for handling references, it comes as both a plugin to Firefox and as standalone. I use the standalone version to extract reference information from pdf and then export to, in my case, BibTeX .bib format. There are possibilities to export to other formats as well.


14

Several .bib files in the a single folder: You might want to do this if you write about quite disjoint topics, or if you want to keep several sets of inherently different references in separate files (e.g. scientific publications in one file, technical standard documents in another, etc.). Overall, however, I see little reason to choose this approach. One ....


12

I really liked Mendeley's potential but got frustrated with both their pricing model (maybe I just never learned how to use the software correctly) and it consistently butchering imported BibTeX entries. I've been a pretty happy BibDesk user for a long time, it is true open source software, but unfortunately it has not been ported outside of the OS X ...


12

I have tried any number of reference management programs (from EndNote to Mendeley and back), and have come to the conclusion that the most important criterion is that the reference manager directly, natively writes in .bib, or some other text-based, open-source format. This has several advantages: no proprietary or otherwise lock-in future-proof fast and ...


11

This doesn't answer your entire question, but may be useful (for example, you might have got the papers from a list of DOIs in the first place). Assuming these are PDFs with CrossRef DOIs, if you can extract the DOI from the PDF, you can get citation directly from CrossRef's API. For the DOI 10.5555/12345678, the query: http://api.crossref.org/works/10....


11

I don't know OP's definition of easy way but it only took me 2 minutes to go to the journal's webpage, click on the archive, go to year 2007, open up some of the issues in volume 317 and finally find page 1500 in issue 5844: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/317/5844 Year, volume and issue (and page numbers) exist to make finding an article easy. I'd ...


10

Bibbase I think that BibBase would be a perfect solution if you can at least run CGI scripts; instructions can be found on this page (if you can run PHP then it's even simpler). You need to feed it a Bibtex file, but if you use Mendeley then it can automatically grab it from there. Update: Bibbase now allows you to use just javascript. (h/t ChristianF) ...


10

Yes, Mendeley does offer export - BibTex, RIS, and EndNote XML. The search is pretty decent, though I often find I use Acrobat search instead - its word-stemming seems better. Batch replacement is very weak - the only way to do it is to go into the database yourself and tweak it. Very unsatisfactory. There is some batch update, in that you can select ...


9

It depends what you mean by using bibliography software. I think of bibliography software as doing three things: They help you organize, search, and find your references. While Pubmed and Google Scholar are quite efficient at finding references for my field, I often prefer to search my own library of papers I am familiar with when looking for a reference. I ...


9

From a short comparison of the features listed on the website here is list of Mendeley features that ReadCube doesnt have: In-text citation insertion and formation: Mendeley has Word and other plugins, ReadCube only exports to Endnote and "your favorite citation software" Sharing and collaboration features ReadCube is only a desktop app (no web app), and it ...


9

In the "old days" this was what had to be done manually. I simply printed the reference list (one-sided print) and went through the text and checked the references I passed in the text and checked the corresponding one in the reference list. This would take maybe 20-30 minutes(?). It is clear that this is easier to do on paper than on screen but it is a very ...


9

I can think of at least three real-world advantages we gain by learning how to cite articles manually: It compels us to become familiar with the syntax and form of citations, which makes references to articles easier to read and parse ... something that we all still have to do manually. If you only need to jot down or reference one article you can do so ...


9

Probably, the only general rule to follow is that the key should be something that well characterizes the document. Anything more specific will depend a lot on the topics you are writing about, and vary from reference to reference: Is the title very unique, or rather generic? In the former case, a shortened version of the title could be integrated into the ...


8

An even easier solution that doesn't require anything except the ability to upload a BibTeX file is Exhibit. It takes your bibtex, does some javascripting on it, and renders the result. It seems CSS-stylable, and even allows for faceted search.


8

One option would be to create a tags P1, P2, P3, P4 ... and assign "rating" to articles how much priority they have. Tags could be updated as priority changes. (similar system could be used with Delicious.com tags to websites) Tags are more flexible then folders. Mainly - Multiple membership in more than one tags


8

Mendeley does it actually. I did not try properly before. Then I had a problem with getting the authors correct. What you need to do is put them as follows Last Name, First Names Last Name, First Names and so on. After Edit-1:Another useful thing in Mendeley is that, you just have to select the authors from the pdf and Mendeley will give suggestions on ...


8

Put it in to Google Scholar In general, Google scholar is very good. You can copy a full reference into Google Scholar and it will often return just the article you are looking for. In general, this works well, for example, you can copy and paste the reference from a journal article into the Google Scholar search box and get the article. Presumably, this ...


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