103

I'm not sure how far ethics comes into this, but omitting accents is, effectively, a misspelling of the name. If you need to cite something by Schön, and you instead write "Schon", I'd regard that as analogous to writing "Schöm" or "Schöh": pretty close, but certainly a typo. If I'm reviewing a paper, I will request correction of missing accents as I would ...


101

As somebody with accents in the name who does not put them on scientific papers, I would recommend going with the way they put their names on the papers. Certain people are very particular about having the right accents, but others (including myself) consider them a nuisance and avoid them. The only way to know in the particular case is to check the paper ...


39

You do not need to use reference managers. However, if you use some reference managers like Mendeley then, some of the benefits are obvious: The pdf of your article is linked to the reference itself. You can organize references into logical groups (areas, subjects, disciplines, sub-disciplines) by utilizing folders and tags. You can one-click save articles ...


37

This isn't a matter of ethics: it's a matter of respect. It is disrespectful to spell somebody's name incorrectly. It is doubly disrespectful to knowingly spell somebody's name incorrectly because you're too damned lazy to do it right.


28

If you're using Adobe Acrobat Reader (which I suspect you are), you can press alt + left to jump back to where you were before clicking the link. I find it amazingly useful.


17

All bibliographic software has a learning curve. You have to invest time and energy up front to learn the system and set up your database, and only reap the benefits later in the decreased amortized cost of maintaining correct citations. If somebody doesn't think the tradeoff will be worth it (e.g., thinks they "aren't good with computers" or doesn't ...


17

I fully agree and can give extra input into @BurakUlgut's answer (+1), and @Ponts answer about the names in the paper itself. I want to reinforce the advice that you should use the names as the author's themselves put on the papers. This will prevent confusion in some cases. In the country where I was born my name contains an accent (actually a non-latin1 ...


16

Docear Haven't tried it yet but https://www.docear.org/ seems to stand out as one of the leading open-source alternative to mendeley. Docear is basically a marriage of JabRef and Freeplane. It uses JabRef as a backend for its reference management and Freeplane to organize references, annotations you make in the pdf, and any other information (including ...


15

My main tip would be to use a reference manager that automates the task of formatting references. There are many to choose from. But any good tool should make it fairly trivial to move between author-date format to numbered format. Good tools should also come with a wide range of tools for customising the look and feel of your references. Personally, I use ...


14

I use Zotero which in itself is a system for handling references, it comes as both a plugin to Firefox and as standalone. I use the standalone version to extract reference information from pdf and then export to, in my case, BibTeX .bib format. There are possibilities to export to other formats as well.


14

Several .bib files in the a single folder: You might want to do this if you write about quite disjoint topics, or if you want to keep several sets of inherently different references in separate files (e.g. scientific publications in one file, technical standard documents in another, etc.). Overall, however, I see little reason to choose this approach. One ....


12

I have tried any number of reference management programs (from EndNote to Mendeley and back), and have come to the conclusion that the most important criterion is that the reference manager directly, natively writes in .bib, or some other text-based, open-source format. This has several advantages: no proprietary or otherwise lock-in future-proof fast and ...


11

This doesn't answer your entire question, but may be useful (for example, you might have got the papers from a list of DOIs in the first place). Assuming these are PDFs with CrossRef DOIs, if you can extract the DOI from the PDF, you can get citation directly from CrossRef's API. For the DOI 10.5555/12345678, the query: http://api.crossref.org/works/10....


11

I don't know OP's definition of easy way but it only took me 2 minutes to go to the journal's webpage, click on the archive, go to year 2007, open up some of the issues in volume 317 and finally find page 1500 in issue 5844: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/317/5844 Year, volume and issue (and page numbers) exist to make finding an article easy. I'd ...


10

In the "old days" this was what had to be done manually. I simply printed the reference list (one-sided print) and went through the text and checked the references I passed in the text and checked the corresponding one in the reference list. This would take maybe 20-30 minutes(?). It is clear that this is easier to do on paper than on screen but it is a very ...


10

I can think of at least three real-world advantages we gain by learning how to cite articles manually: It compels us to become familiar with the syntax and form of citations, which makes references to articles easier to read and parse ... something that we all still have to do manually. If you only need to jot down or reference one article you can do so ...


9

From a short comparison of the features listed on the website here is list of Mendeley features that ReadCube doesnt have: In-text citation insertion and formation: Mendeley has Word and other plugins, ReadCube only exports to Endnote and "your favorite citation software" Sharing and collaboration features ReadCube is only a desktop app (no web app), and it ...


9

Probably, the only general rule to follow is that the key should be something that well characterizes the document. Anything more specific will depend a lot on the topics you are writing about, and vary from reference to reference: Is the title very unique, or rather generic? In the former case, a shortened version of the title could be integrated into the ...


9

First of all, let me state this, because this does not seem to be understood by the OP but none of the other answers actually try to clarify this confusion. "Series volume no" is an abbreviation of "series volume number", i.e. the number of the volume in the series. The journal is asking you what the position (number) of your book (the ...


8

Put it in to Google Scholar In general, Google scholar is very good. You can copy a full reference into Google Scholar and it will often return just the article you are looking for. In general, this works well, for example, you can copy and paste the reference from a journal article into the Google Scholar search box and get the article. Presumably, this ...


7

If you're serious about such a project, I think what you need to do is recognize that this task naturally separates into two parts. It will be very easy to find a good, general purpose and freely available program that suits your taste for visualizing/analyzing/discovering networks in general. I think cytoscape is pretty good, although I've only played ...


7

Note that when getting articles via Readcube from the journals that support it, you don't actually get a copy of the article. It seems Readcube is one way big publishers are trying to "contain" their copyrighted articles and prevent readers from having a true copy. This article explains some of that: http://rossmounce.co.uk/2015/03/19/how-to-block-readcube-...


7

We have developed an open source solution, downloadable from GitHub at https://github.com/scientilla/scientilla, that allows users to collaboratively share and refine their scientific bibliographic metadata. The system relies on a "peer-to-peer" and "open-data" approach as well as on a "clone-and-refine" algorithm. It can import ...


7

Here is one nearly automatic way to do it using Zotero (https://www.zotero.org/): 1) import the PDFs in Zotero. One way is to select multiple PDFs and drag them into a collection (in the LHS pane) of Zotero. 2) Select the PDF items (CTRL click in Windows for multiple selections), right click and select "Retrieve metadata from PDF". Note that this step ...


7

I have worked in similar cross-platform teams. Mine in the past was more Latex on Linux with bibtex versus Microsoft Word on Windows with Zotero. In that case, we were working on multiple papers together, so our policy was that everyone went along with the tool that the first author preferred, so we all got a lot of cross-platform experience. That worked for ...


6

JabRef is a reference manager using the BibTeX format. It uses the concept of groups, i.e. papers can be put into groups, and it allows to create a hierarchical group structure. Since one paper can be put into any number of groups, it is essentially hierarchical tagging. With JabRef, one can even configure for individual groups whether a group will ...


6

I've personally used this feature, and I really like it - though honestly, part of the value I get from Mendeley is that I stop worrying about my files and folders and just use the software itself most of the time. As I have it sync them up I'm not even really concerned with where it stores them any more. My recommendation is just to copy-paste your ...


6

Zotero is a free (and open source!) alternative: https://www.zotero.org/ There is a plenty of other tools (just google 'citation managers'), but I believe that Zotero's open source nature renders it preferable to all alternatives - including Mendeley, which belongs to the large commercial publisher Elsevier.


5

So I'm a ReadCube user who was a Mendeley user - ReadCube does have a citation tool for Word and their apps make articles interactive - things like references, authors, figures are clickable - which is pretty neat. Their recommendations are pretty good too if you have enough in your library - otherwise the results can be pretty generic. I guess that makes ...


5

Sadly, not yet... Many publishers view their bibliographic metadata as commercial property and hold-on to it fairly tightly. Mendeley will release little bits of the article data they have accumulated from all their users, but they will not let anyone download all of it - it's valuable property that they want to keep 'in-house'. There are a few truly ...


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