108 votes
Accepted

How did researchers find articles before the Internet and the computer era?

We depended on libraries and librarians. Grad students would spend hours in, say, the math section of a good academic library, going from book to book and taking copious notes (on paper, of course). ...
Buffy's user avatar
  • 358k
85 votes

Where can I find a paper that has been cited multiple times but only ever appears as a citation?

Ask your librarian. They are really (really) good at finding these articles. That said, the article you're looking for isn't actually an article. This link indicates it's actually a poster at the ...
Allure's user avatar
  • 125k
58 votes
Accepted

Can I ask a publisher for a paper that I need for reviewing

Yes, you can. Chances are they'll be willing to give it to you. See also: Can a referee request a paper referenced in the reviewed paper?, except your situation is simpler because the desk editor of ...
Allure's user avatar
  • 125k
56 votes

How can I find an old, obscure, or otherwise inaccessible paper when the usual methods fail?

Your university librarians are MADE for this! Don't feel ashamed to ask -- there are librarians more into archiving and cataloging, and some more into education and service. Give as much information ...
April  Salutes Monica C.'s user avatar
50 votes

How did researchers find articles before the Internet and the computer era?

One point that the other answers have passed over is that there were various services the libraries subscribed to which surveyed the literature and provided abstracts and cross indexing of the primary ...
Charles E. Grant's user avatar
46 votes
Accepted

Where can I find a paper that has been cited multiple times but only ever appears as a citation?

You won't be able to find the full text of this particular article because it doesn't exist! The work was actually a poster presentation at the Intensive Care Society's Spring 1997 meeting. The ...
Matt's user avatar
  • 5,171
43 votes

I "lost" a paper: what can I do?

Ask the librarian at your institution. They are absolute wizards at finding information, and are also usually very happy to help.
Christian's user avatar
  • 531
37 votes

How can I find an old, obscure, or otherwise inaccessible paper when the usual methods fail?

Why donʼt you contact the library of the institution who published the paper for advice? Iʼm sure that the library has a copy of it, and they might have translations as well.
onpre's user avatar
  • 505
35 votes

How can I find an old, obscure, or otherwise inaccessible paper when the usual methods fail?

When doing internet searches, consider using all variants of the author's name. In [one specific case someone asked about], I was able to find the paper by excluding the author's given name; this ...
BrtH's user avatar
  • 322
34 votes
Accepted

How likely is it that an PhD examiner will find something I've missed? And if they do, how much of a problem is it?

Here are some observations I've gathered from reading your question (with the disclaimer that I don't know you and am taking your description at face value). You have done a PhD in a topic and know ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 8,270
31 votes

How did researchers find articles before the Internet and the computer era?

(Comment extended to post:) My impression is that part of the answer is "they didn't", or more precisely "they were only as good at it as their own knowledge and that of their communities". In ...
darij grinberg's user avatar
30 votes

Locating a specific German Ph.D. Dissertation from 1959

In general, I'd always expect the university library where the dissertation was done to have at least one exemplar in their archives. The national library is also supposed to have at least one ...
cbeleites unhappy with SX's user avatar
28 votes

How to admit that the cited source is lost?

The answer is still "ask your librarian". You say your librarian is famously incompetent, but that shouldn't be disqualifying - you can still ask a different librarian. If your library only ...
Allure's user avatar
  • 125k
26 votes
Accepted

Locating a specific German Ph.D. Dissertation from 1959

Any online resources may be unlikely for a dissertation that old, but there are some possibilities. Try these. The Classics department at Göttingen. The university library at Göttingen. Proquest, ...
Buffy's user avatar
  • 358k
22 votes

Conducting a literature review, what period should the papers be taken from?

The year that a paper was published is entirely irrelevant to the question of if it is worthy of inclusion. I’ve read good review papers citing work that is almost three thousand years old and I’ve ...
Stella Biderman's user avatar
20 votes
Accepted

How to search for one phrase in the title and a different phrase in the body of the paper in a single Google Scholar search?

You can use intitle: to search for phrases in the title (no space after the colon) and similarly you can use intext: to search in the body. intitle:"meta analysis" intext:Alexandria
Austin Henley's user avatar
20 votes

How did researchers find articles before the Internet and the computer era?

Although I haven't really known this time myself, I think it's important to mention the much more crucial role that conferences and journals used to play in the dissemination of specialized knowledge. ...
Erwan's user avatar
  • 13.6k
19 votes

How likely is it that an PhD examiner will find something I've missed? And if they do, how much of a problem is it?

Even experienced researchers can wrongly believe to have discovered something new when a similar observation had been reported before. The consecrated phrase to tone down a priority claim is "to ...
Joce's user avatar
  • 480
17 votes

How to choose a good research problem?

This is a really important question, and it's one that isn't asked enough. From reading your question, though, it sounds like you are rushing a bit. Renowned physicist and biologist Uri Alon (34k+ ...
Ulf Aslak's user avatar
  • 377
17 votes

How to search in Google Scholar within a particular conference?

To search within a particular conference, open the navigation menu on the Google Scholar start page, using the hamburger button (☰) on the top left, and click on "Advanced search". This will ...
lighthouse keeper's user avatar
16 votes

How can I find an old, obscure, or otherwise inaccessible paper when the usual methods fail?

This is a use-case for Sci-Hub, an open collection of papers from various journals. Note that using Sci-Hub to access copyrighted materials which they do not have permission to give you is illegal in ...
forest's user avatar
  • 263
16 votes
Accepted

How to conduct an effective literature survey in mathematics?

Simple answer: There are actually two good and well-known (at least, I had thought so) bibliographic databases for mathematical literature: MathSciNet zbMATH The latter is freely available online ...
Jochen Glueck's user avatar
15 votes
Accepted

How does one ensure their knowledge of a field is complete when doing a literature review

This seems like an impossible task. You're right, it is impossible. One can really never hope to gain a "complete" knowledge of a field, or even a subfield. You just have to do the best you can, in ...
Nate Eldredge's user avatar
15 votes

How to search in Google Scholar within a particular conference?

You can use the source: operator. For example, search by source:NIPS to restrict to documents published by sources containing "NIPS" in their name.
FWDekker's user avatar
  • 251
15 votes

Why isn't literature search a waste of time if centralized documentation is a better alternative?

These central repositories exists - they are called a (digital) library. What we typically mean with "doing literature review" is going into one or more digital libraries and retrieving all ...
xLeitix's user avatar
  • 135k
14 votes

Find article link by bibtex citation key

The citation key in bibtex can be anything you want. What you call JagadeeshChandraBose2010, I can call 1234567 or abcdefg, as long as I call it the same thing in the tex file as in the bib file. ...
ff524's user avatar
  • 109k
14 votes
Accepted

Why is my published article seemingly not indexed by Google or Google Scholar?

Although you asked a generic question, the answer is very particular to your own particular article. Most likely, @HoboSci, got the correct answer: you published in a journal of questionable ethical ...
Tripartio's user avatar
  • 9,302
14 votes

How did researchers find articles before the Internet and the computer era?

It was a LOT harder before the internet. Time spent traveling to and from the information source is eliminated by instant transmission of data. If people were lucky enough to be able to spend long ...
user110183's user avatar
13 votes

How to identify the publications that cite two specific papers?

My procedure was simple but worked for me. It is similar but different to that suggested by tripartio. Look up article A in Google Scholar. Click the link for articles that cite that article A. Check ...
Tim Williams's user avatar

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