39

Yes, promotion and hiring committees look at Google Scholar, especially in fields like computer science where Google's citation data is more comprehensive than other sources like Scopus, which misses many citations of and by conference papers. In this respect, Google Scholar hasn't really changed the way people are evaluated, though; we've just replaced one ...


36

As someone who is currently on a search committee for two tenure track positions in mathematics, I can tell you that "hiding" your profile certainly won't help. In the job search process, potential employers are going to want to know about your research and its impact. It's common to check on Google Scholar, Math Reviews, Web of Science, and similar ...


33

The paper appears black because Google Scholar has not found the full-text of the paper during its crawls. Rather it has extracted the document as a citation from other documents it has seen. Hence Google Scholar knows that the document exists (it has been cited) but does not know where to find it.


27

To answer the (original version of the) question in the title: Are scientific articles of public domain? the answer is absolutely not, unless the relevant copyright holders declared it so or that its copyright has expired. Note that public domain is emphatically different from open access. To answer the question in the body: Is it legal for the ...


26

This may not be the answer you're looking for, but one solution would be to update the arXiv paper so that its title agrees with the published paper. (You can change an arXiv paper's title by submitting a revision.) Maybe you prefer the title from the arXiv, but using different titles causes enough hassle and confusion that I can't really believe it's ...


24

Google Scholar, as you said, does not provide API, nor a complete documentation. In the comment Davidmh cites this question, and I think that settles everything: Google Scholar robot.txt disallows bots Google service Terms of Service says Don’t misuse our Services. For example, don’t interfere with our Services or try to access them using a method other ...


23

You can't. Google Scholar, like everything Google, does not curate the data. It only indexes them and makes them easy to search through. If the citing document is online it'll be counted as a citation. Google Scholar citations count, h-index and i-10 index are not accurate if you have quality criteria for what constitute a citation (an most reasonable ...


21

Math already has an excellent tool, MathSciNet. And, more importantly, MathSciNet is much more accurate than Google Scholar. If you are a mathematician, look up yourself in both places and compare!


19

Google Scholar profiles are not transferable. But you can delete the Google Scholar profile from your own account. Then create a new profile while signed in to your advisor's account. To delete the Scholar profile from your own account, go to Google Scholar and click on "Settings": then click on "Account": then click on "Delete or recover your Scholar ...


19

Check out Publish or Perish. You can run keyword queries on Google Scholar from there, and export the results to .csv, which you can later open from Excel


18

By now there is an option when editing the merged GoogleScholar article's version as shown in the example below. The option is called "Unmerge this article and add it to my profile as a separate entry."


18

Verified email just mean that the user has done the confirmation in his/her inbox. It means in that case that the person that created this profile has an email with the domain "@melipona.org". Usually, people will do this verification with their institutional email, adding credence that this is the right person, but technically, anyone within an institution ...


18

(Edit: I am no longer at Google Scholar, so I cannot fix issues for anyone anymore.) I am an engineer on the Google Scholar team. Errors in citation data provided by Google Scholar can occur either because of an error at the source or a case that is not handled correctly by our algorithms. We have automated monitoring systems in place to detect errors that ...


17

You can use intitle: to search for phrases in the title (no space after the colon) and similarly you can use intext: to search in the body. intitle:"meta analysis" intext:Alexandria


15

"My citations", then tick the square boxes next to the papers you want to merge, then click on the "merge" button that just appeared.


14

The obvious place to report it would be the Google Scholar "contact us" form. I suspect there is little chance of the problems being fixed (since scholar has been around for over a decade, and I'm sure others must have reported these problems over the years) but you have little to lose by trying.


13

You can report the error at the following link: https://support.google.com/scholar/contact/general


13

Yes, it will. See for example: Or:


13

Although you asked a generic question, the answer is very particular to your own particular article. Most likely, @HoboSci, got the correct answer: you published in a journal of questionable ethical editorial policy that Google Scholar refuses to index. That is, "Journal of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Research" is probably such a journal (see https://...


12

Even in case you generally accept numerical measures such as citation counts or the h-index as a measure of quality, Google Scholar seems to be rather unreliable in them. In the case of evaluating individual authors, let me cite the Wikipedia article on Google Scholar: Vulnerability to spam — Google Scholar is vulnerable to spam.[26] Researchers from the ...


11

Not too sure if you are looking for this. See One policy, one Google experience released by Google On March 1, 2012, we changed our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service. We got rid of over 60 different privacy policies across Google and replaced them with one that’s a lot shorter and easier to read. The new policy and terms cover multiple products ...


11

As of August 31, 2016, this functionality has been added! See this blog post: https://googlescholar.blogspot.com/2016/08/organizing-your-scholar-library.html


11

Yes, it is. English is a lingua franca, but that doesn't mean that all scholarly literature must be in English. Make sure your paper is in a institutional or disciplinary repository, if you like the idea of your paper to be open access. Translate it, as Davidmh suggests, to make it even more available. Regarding indexing in Google Scholar, that depends by ...


11

The recipe is this: Sign In to Google Scholar. Click on My Citations. Type your co-author name in the search box provided (top right). You will get a list of authors that match the search. Click on the "Add co-author" button on the right of the correct person. If your author is not found, you will get a failed search. If you click on the wrong person, you ...


11

ArXiv papers take a few days to get indexed by Google scholar. It should show up eventually. The procedure to add it your profile is no different than with any other paper from any other database.


11

In general, I find the Google Scholar profile pages to be elegant and useful. Some people choose not to add co-authors to their profile pages. You might not see any benefit. You might not want to play favourites (i.e., who is enough of a co-author to be listed; what if I forget to add someone, would they be mildly offended). In general, random people will ...


11

The pages for Feynman, Einstein, and others (probably including Freud) were set up manually by the team behind Google Scholar back before the service launched in 2011, as evidenced by this blog post. Without their access, I believe you need to provide an (possibly fake) email address, as done for Theodore Dru Alison Cockerell, see this question. I would, ...


10

To answer the question in the title: free access to an article depends largely on the version. It's almost always fine to post versions on your institutional page. Some journals do have embargo periods, during which you must refrain from doing so. Depending on the field and journal, authors may post one of the following on their institutional website: ...


10

Remember that the way the arxiv works, the default paper identifier goes to the most recent version that's been uploaded. So even if Google Scholar caches an older version, it's using the same URL. Now if you make changes like changing the title and/or material parts of the abstract, then it might take a while for the new title to percolate through the ...


10

I suspect that Google Scholar is getting the page title from the metadata of the arXiv page, which has the following title metadata (look at the HTML page source in your browser to see it): [1509.00976] In-Band $\alpha$-Duplex Scheme for Cellular Networks: A Stochastic Geometry Approach The good news is, you can edit how your own papers appear in Google ...


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